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This cocktail tastes like a rich and creamy chocolate milkshake. Chocolate liqueur is shaken with ice, creme de cacao, vodka and single cream, then served in a chocolate syrup rimmed glass.

16 people made this

IngredientsServes: 1

  • 3 tablespoons chocolate liqueur
  • 3 tablespoons creme de cacao
  • 1 tablespoon vodka
  • 75ml single cream
  • 2 teaspoons chocolate syrup

MethodPrep:5min ›Ready in:5min

  1. Pour the chocolate liqueur, creme de cacao, vodka and cream into a cocktail shaker over ice. Cover and shake until the outside of the shaker has frosted. Dip the rim of a chilled martini glass in chocolate syrup. Strain the cocktail into the glass to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(19)

Reviews in English (14)

by nikki p17

This isn't exactly how I wrote the recipe, but I guess the powers that be have the right to change it. I used CHOCOLATE-FLAVORED vodka, vanilla-CARAMEL non-dairy creamer and COATED the inside of the maritini glass with chocolate syrup, not just the rim. These small changed may make the difference in whether you like it or not.-20 Feb 2008

by GaterChick

Thanks Nikki!! I've been looking for a recipe like this...I tried it and it turned out great! I also made sure I included the left-out instructions...you're right though it did make the difference. All I did to it was add some mint chocolate shavings to the top and voila! Perrrrfect! Thanks again Nikki!!-14 Jun 2008

by Angela Miller

Glad I read the reviews first. Not sure why the site would change the recipe. I put a shot of vodka, a shot of creme de cacoa, and a shot of Bailey's Irish Cream (did not have creamer). It turned out pretty good.-19 Dec 2010


A Chocolate Milk Stout Recipe for Those Cold Winter Days

I’m not the conventional beer drinker. Some like to think winter time is for darker beers, but I still enjoy lighter fruit beers when the temperatures drop.

However, not everyone is weird like me, so here is a chocolate filled stout you can really sink your teeth into. Whether it be after shoveling some snow or a day at the rink, this beer is better than any hot winter beverage.

This beer is full of chocolate flavor. This can be accomplished using specific specialty grains, however, I like to give the beer a little more punch by aging it on cocoa nibs after primary fermentation. The key to soaking cocoa nibs is to extract their flavor. Some people like to bake them first, but I found that a good soak in vodka does the trick. Also, the lactose gives a good sweetness to it.


Recipe Summary

  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup confectioners' sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup marshmallow creme

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease a cookie sheet.

To Make Cookie Crusts: In a large mixing bowl, cream together 1/2 cup butter or margarine and white sugar. Add egg, evaporated milk, and vanilla. Mix well. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, salt, cocoa powder, baking soda, and baking powder. Add flour mixture slowly to sugar mixture while stirring. Mix just until all ingredients are combined.

Drop the dough onto greased cookie sheet by rounded tablespoonfuls. Leave at least 3 inches in between each one dough will spread as it bakes.

Bake in preheated oven for 6 to 8 minutes, until firm when pressed with finger. Allow to cool at least one hour before filling.

To Make Marshmallow Filling: In a medium mixing bowl, blend together 1/2 cup butter or margarine, confectioners' sugar, flavored extract, and marshmallow creme. Mix until smooth. Assemble pies by spreading 1 to 2 tablespoonfuls of filling on flat side of a cookie crust, then covering filling with flat side of another cookie crust.


Chocolate Oatmeal Stout

Cook Time: 3 Hours

Total Time: 4 Weeks

Ingredients:

Malt:
6 lb Pale 2 row
.5 lb Chocolate Malt
.25 lb Roasted Barley
5 oz Crystal 80L
.5 lb Flaked Oats

.5 lb lactose sugar @ 10 min
2 oz cocoa powder @ 15 min
2 oz cocoa nibs
2.5 oz bourbon

Hops:
.25 oz Nugget @ 60 min
.5 oz Willamette @ 30 min

Yeast:
Safale US-05, 1 packet, no starter or re-hydration.

Directions:

Please note, this is a simplified explanation of the brewing process. I highly recommend reading through the BIAB forum for more thorough instructions regarding this method.

Bring 4 gallons of water plus 2 cups to 152 degrees F in a large pot. Turn off heat. Secure grain bag around edge of pot and slowly pour in milled grain and stir. Hold water temperature at 152 degrees F for 75 minutes, checking temperature with thermometer and turning heat back on in short intervals to maintain temperature if necessary.

Remove the grain bag, give it a squeeze, and let as much liquid drain back into the pot as possible. Bring the liquid (wort) to a rolling boil uncovered, and add the .25 oz of Nugget hops. Set a timer for 60 minutes. When there is 30 minutes left in the boil, add the .5 oz of Willamette hops. At 15 minutes to go, add the cocoa powder, and then the lactose sugar when there is 10 minutes left in the boil. Total boil time is 60 minutes.

At the end of the boil, remove pot from heat, place sanitized lid over the pot, and cool to 65 degrees F. You can place the pot in a bath of cool water, or use special equipment made for cooling wort. When the wort has cooled, transfer to a sanitized carboy or fermentation bucket. Aerate the wort by vigorously shaking the carboy for five minutes, pitch yeast, and seal with an airlock.

As the beer begins to ferment, place the cocoa nibs in the bourbon and allow to soak for 4 days. Once primary fermentation is complete (3-5 days), add the nibs and bourbon to carboy and allow fermentation to reach final gravity.

When the fermentation is complete, you have the option of either kegging the beer, or allowing the beer to condition in bottles.

All images and text © Lindsay Landis / Love & Olive Oil

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I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

For 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

Menu Description: "Our appetizing cheese dip with seasoned beef. Served with warm tostada chips."

Take your chips for a dip in this top-secret Chili's skillet queso copycat recipe that comes to your table in a small cast iron skillet along with a big bowl of tortilla chips. A popular recipe that's been circulating calls for combining Velveeta with Hormel no-bean chili. Sure, it's a good start, but there's more to Chili's spicy cheese dip than that. Toss a few other ingredients into the saucepan and after about 20 minutes you'll have a great dip for picnic, party, or game time.

Now, what's for dinner? Check out my other Chili's copycat recipes here.

The first Auntie Anne's pretzel store opened in 1988 in the heart of pretzel country—a Pennsylvanian Amish farmers' market. Over 500 stores later, Auntie Anne's is one of the most requested secret clone recipes around, especially on the internet. Many of the copycat Auntie Anne's soft pretzel recipes passed around the Web require bread flour, and some use honey as a sweetener. But by studying the Auntie Anne's home pretzel-making kit in the secret underground laboratory, I've discovered a better solution for re-creating the delicious mall treats than any clone recipe out there. For the best quality dough, you just need all-purpose flour. And powdered sugar works great to perfectly sweeten the dough. Now you just have to decide if you want to make the more traditional salted pretzels, or the sweet cinnamon sugar-coated kind. Decisions, decisions.

If you like soup that's packed with veggies, that's low in fat, and has some Southwestern punch to it, this is the soup for you. Just toss all the ingredients in a pot and simmer. Garnish with some shredded cheese and crumbled tortillas, and warm up your insides.

When you sit down for Italian-style grub at one of the more than 168 nationwide Carrabba's restaurants, you're first served a small plate with a little pile of herbs and spices in the middle to which the waiter adds olive oil. Now you're set up to dip your sliced bread in the freshly flavored oil. To craft a version of this Carrabba's olive oil bread dip recipe, you'll need a coffee bean grinder or a small food processor to finely chop the ingredients.

Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

Menu Description: "Lean shaved Philly steak folded into a grilled tortilla roll with Monterey Jack and Cheddar, sauteed mushrooms, onions, tomatoes, bacon and jalapenos."

With the acquisition of 13 Rio Bravo cantinas in 1994, Applebee's made its move into the competitive "Mexican casual dining sector." Perhaps it's the company's interest in Mexican food that inspired this Philadelphia-Tijuana hybrid sandwich. The steak, cheese, mushrooms, and onions give the sandwich a Philly taste, while the tomatoes, bacon, jalapenos, and the tortilla take you across the border.

I really like this newer addition to the menu, probably because I'm a big cheesesteak fan who also loves Mexican food. As you can see from this dish, Applebee's has a knack for breathing new life into old sandwich concepts. I hope you'll find this one worth a try.

If you want to make a "lite" version, refer to the Tidbits at the bottom of the recipe.

In 1995 pediatric nurse Lindsay Frucci discovered a way to make chewy, fudgy brownies without any of fat. Today you can find her brownie mix boxes in thousands of grocery stores and specialty markets throughout the country. All you have to do is add some nonfat vanilla yogurt to the dry mix and bake. The brownies that emerge from your oven are good, but the mix can be pricey. One box of No Pudge! Fat Free Fudge Brownie Mix will set you back around four bucks, which seems like a lot when you consider that boxes of regular brownie mix from larger brands such as Pillsbury or Duncan Hines contain similar ingredients but sell for roughly half that. So I spent a week burning through gobs of cocoa, sugar, and flour in hopes of discovering an easy way to re-create that tasty mix at a fraction of the cost of even the cheapest brownie mix on the market. After much trial and error I finally nailed it.

I tried many batches with Hershey's and Nestle's cocoa, but eventually decided the best widely available unsweetened cocoa powder for the task is the stuff made by Ghirardelli. Before you assemble this clone recipe, you'll also want to track down baker's sugar, which is a superfine sugar, and some powdered egg whites (health foods stores or cake decorating suppliers carry this). Combine all the dry ingredients in a bowl, and when you're ready to make the brownies, simply mix in 2/3 cup of nonfat vanilla yogurt, just like with the real thing. In 34 baking minutes (same as regular minutes, but they seem much longer) you'll have one plate of amazing fat-free chocolate brownies ready to eat.

Click here for more famous cookie and brownie copycat recipes.

Since the candy maker’s first milk chocolate bar debuted in 1900, just three other candy bars have carried the Hershey’s name. Hershey’s Special Dark came out in 1939 and Hershey’s Cookies and Crème was introduced in 1995. The third one—and the first to be made without any chocolate in it—is the new Hershey’s Gold Peanuts & Pretzels, which hit the shelves in late 2017.

The base of the bar is “caramelized crème” that Hershey’s claims is made by browning the sugar in white crème. I recalled a recipe for caramelizing white chocolate by slowly cooking it in the oven, stirring often, until it becomes golden brown. By mixing in a little creamy peanut butter and salt with the white chocolate before it goes in the oven, I created a perfect golden base to which crushed peanuts and pretzels could be added.

I poured the golden crème into candy bar molds and let them set in the fridge for 30 minutes. When I removed the candy from the molds it looked like it was made in a real candy bar factory, and it tasted like it too. I wrapped each in gold foil and felt like Willy Wonka.

If you don’t have candy bar molds for your candy bars, you can make the candy in a more old-fashioned, homemade style by pouring the cooked candy onto parchment paper or wax paper on a baking sheet and allowing it to cool. When it’s firm, break up the candy and store it in a covered container or a resealable bag.

Find more cool candy copycat recipes here.

Menu Description: "Two cheeses, bacon, tomatoes, onion, jalapenos grilled between tortillas with guacamole, sour cream and salsa."

When Bill and T.J. Palmer opened their first restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1980, they realized their dream of building a full-service, reasonably-priced restaurant in a neighborhood setting. They called their first place T.J. Applebee's Edibles and Elixirs, and soon began franchising the concept. In 1988 some franchisees bought the rights to the name and changed it to Applebee's Neighborhood Grill and Bar. By that time, there were over 650 outlets, making Applebee's one of the fastest-growing restaurant chains in the world.

According to waiters at the restaurant, the easy-to-make and slightly spicy quesadillas are one of the most popular appetizers on the Applebee's menu. The recipe calls for 10-inch or "burrito-size" flour tortillas, which can be found in most supermarkets, but any size can be used in a pinch. Look for the jalapeno "nacho slices" in the ethnic or Mexican food section of the supermarket. You'll find these in jars or cans.

Find more of your favorite Applebee's copycat recipes here.

Menu Description: "Slices of turkey breast with bacon, tomato, lettuce, mayonnaise, stacked on toasted bread. Served with coleslaw."

When Bob Wian invented the first Big Boy double-decker hamburger in 1937, his restaurant business went through the roof. Soon a slew of imitators hit the market with their own giant-sized burgers: Bun Boy, Brawney Boy, Super Boy, Yumi Boy, Country Boy, Husky Boy, Hi-Boy, Beefy Boy, Lucky Boy, and many other "Boys" across the burger-crazed country.

By 1985 the Big Boy statues had become a common sight in front of hundreds of Bob's restaurants around the country. This was also the year the Marriott Corporation, which had purchased Bob's from retiring Bob Wian in 1967, created a national ballot to decide whether the Big Boy character would stay or go. Thousands of voters elected to keep the tubby little tike, but his days were numbered. In 1992, Marriott chose to sell all of the Bob's Big Boys to an investment group. Those mostly West Coast Big Boys were later converted to Coco's or Carrows restaurants, and there the Big Boy went bye-bye. The Elias Brothers, a Michigan-area franchiser for many years, purchased the Big Boy name from Marriott in 1987, and today is the sole Big Boy franchiser worldwide.

The Club Sandwich is one of Big Boy's signature sandwiches, and remains one of the most popular items on the menu since it was introduced in the mid-70s.

Menu Description: "Here they are in all their lip-smacking, award-winning glory: Buffalo, New York-style chicken wings spun in your favorite signature sauce."

Since Buffalo, New York was too far away, Jim Disbrow and Scott Lowery satisfied their overwhelming craving in 1981 by opening a spicy chicken wing restaurant close to home in Kent, Ohio. With signature sauces and a festive atmosphere, the chain has now evolved from a college campus sports bar with wings to a family restaurant with over 300 units. While frying chicken wings is no real secret—simply drop them in hot shortening for about 10 minutes—the delicious spicy sauces make the wings special. There are 12 varieties of sauce available to coat your crispy chicken parts at the chain, and I'm presenting clones for the more traditional flavors. These sauces are very thick, almost like dressing or dip, so we'll use an emulsifying technique that will ensure a creamy final product where the oil won't separate from the other ingredients. Here is the chicken wing cooking and coating technique, followed by clones for the most popular sauces: Spicy Garlic, Medium and Hot. The sauce recipes might look the same at first, but each has slight variations make your sauce hotter or milder by adjusting the level of cayenne pepper. You can find Frank's pepper sauce by the other hot sauces in your market. If you can't find that brand, you can also use Crystal Louisiana hot sauce.

Menu Description: "1/4 pound of 100% pure beef in two patties with American cheese, crisp lettuce and our special sauce on a sesame seed bun."

Bob Wian's little ten-stool diner, Bob's Pantry, was in business only a short time in Glendale, California, before establishing a following of regular customers—among them the band members from Chuck Fosters Orchestra. One February night in 1937, the band came by after a gig as they often did to order a round of burgers. In a playful mood, bass player Stewie Strange sat down on a stool and uttered, "How about something different for a change, Bob?" Bob thought it might be funny to play along and serve up Stewie a burger he could barely get his mouth around. So Bob cut a bun into three slices, rather than the usual two, and stacked on two hamburger patties along with lettuce, cheese, and his special sauce. When Stewie tasted the huge sandwich and loved it, every band member wanted his own!

Just a few days later, a plump little six-year old named Richard Woodruff came into the diner and charmed Bob into letting him do odd jobs in exchange for a burger or two. He often wore baggie overalls and had an appetite that forced the affectionate nickname "Fat Boy". Bob thought it was the perfect name for his new burger, except the name was already being used as a trademark for another product. So the name of the new burger, along with Bob's booming chain of restaurants, was changed to "Big Boy." The company's tradename Big Boy character is from a cartoonists napkin sketch of "fat boy," little Richard Woodruff.

The Big Boy hamburger was the first of the double-decker hamburgers. McDonald's Big Mac, the world's best-known burger that came more than 30 years later, was inspired by Bob Wian's original creation. See if you can get your mouth around it.

Check out my other Big Boy copycat recipes here.

Here's a great one for the holidays, or anytime you want, really. It's a mint chocolate brownie with peppermint buttercream frosting on top and creamy chocolate frosting on top of that. And to simplify the cloning process, we start with a common fudge brownie mix. By changing the required ingredients listed on the brownie mix box and modifying some steps, we can improve on the finished product. Rather than oil, use a stick of melted butter in your brownies for a richer, better flavor. And cook the brownies at a slightly lower temperature so that they come out moist and chewy. Since this recipe is for peppermint brownies, add just a bit of peppermint extract to the batter. The peppermint brownies from Starbucks have red and white frosting drizzled lightly across the top. To duplicate this easily you can buy premade red and white colored frostings that come in little cans with tips included.

Check out my other Starbucks copycat recipes here.

Menu Description: "Broiled and served with sweet ginger soy, baby corn and spinach."

Grab a couple half-pound sea bass fillets (not too thick), whip up a simple marinade and you're on your way to cloning one of the most beloved dishes at America's fastest growing Chinese bistro chain. The marinade is made with only six ingredients so you'll have that done in no time. If you can't find oolong tea, you can use green tea. Loose tea is best, but if you can only find bags, that's okay. One teabag contains 1 teaspoon of tea, so you'll just need half of a teabag for this recipe (in fact, the recipe still works even without the tea). You will need to plan ahead for this P.F. Chang's oolong marinated sea bass recipe, however, since the fish must marinate for 5 to 7 hours. Once the fish is marinated, fire up the oven to bake it, then finish it off under the broiler. Saute some spinach, garlic, and tiny corn for an optional bed that makes the dish indistinguishable from the real thing.

You'll find a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes over here.

Menu Description: "Spicy, shredded beef, braised with our own chipotle adobo, cumin, cloves, garlic and oregano."

The original Mexican dish barbacoa was traditionally prepared by cooking almost any kind of meat goat, fish, chicken, or cow cheek meat, to name just a few, in a pit covered with leaves over low heat for many hours, until tender. When the dish made its way into the United States via Texas the word transformed into "barbecue" and the preparation changed to incorporate above-ground techniques such as smoking and grilling. The good news is that we can recreate the beef barbacoa that Chipotle has made popular on its ginormous burritos without digging any holes in our backyard or tracking down a local source for fresh cow faces. After braising about 30 pounds of chuck roasts, I finally discovered the perfect clone with a taste-alike adobo sauce that fills your roast with flavor as it slowly cooks to a fork-tender delicacy on your stovetop over 5 to 6 hours. Part of the secret for great adobo sauce is toasting whole cumin seeds and cloves and then grinding them in a coffee grinder (measure the spices after grinding them). Since the braising process takes so long, start early in the day and get ready for a big dinner, because I've also included clones here for Chipotle's pico de gallo, pinto beans, and delicious cilantro-lime rice to make your burritos complete. You can add your choice of cheese, plus guacamole and sour cream for a super-deluxe clone version.

Menu Description: "Breaded boneless chicken breast is delicately spiced and covered in a spicy-sweet orange glaze. Served in a big bowl over almond rice pilaf and a flavorful mixture of mushrooms, broccoli, red pepper, sugar snap peas, and shredded carrots. Topped with toasted almonds and crispy noodles."

In a dish like this, it's important to get the sauce tasting just right or the whole hack will be off. Simmering a secret blend of orange juice, brown sugar, marmalade, and few other ingredients will give you a sauce that's sweet, tangy, spicy and really, really freakin' good. Rather than going to the trouble of breading and frying the chicken from scratch, I've cut time off your prep by including frozen breaded chicken fingers that you simply bake in the oven when you're ready to assemble the dish. I used Claim Jumper brand chicken tenderloins for this recipe since one 20-ounce box was perfect for the two servings this recipe yields. However, these are mongo-huge restaurant-size portions, so you'll be able to divide this recipe up into four more modest servings if you like.

Make more of your favorite dishes from Applebee's.

A good chicken pot pie has perfectly flakey crust and the right ratio of light and dark meat chicken and vegetables swimming in a deliciously creamy white sauce. KFC serves up a pie that totally fits the bill, and now I'm going to show you how to make the same thing at home from scratch. You'll want to start this recipe a couple hours before you plan to bake the pies, since the dough for the crust should chill awhile and the chicken needs to soak in the brine. When it comes time for baking, use small pie tins, ramekins, or Pyrex baking dishes (custard dishes) that hold 1 1/2 cups. The recipe will then yield exactly 4 pot pies. If your baking dishes are smaller, there should still be enough dough here to make crust for up to 6 pot pies. And don't forget to brush egg whites over the top of the pies before you pop them into the oven to get the same shiny crust as the original.


Chocolate eclairs

Start by making the custard filling. Heat the milk until almost boiling in a saucepan. Meanwhile, mix together the sugar, egg yolks and vanilla in a bowl, then stir in the flours, a couple of tsp at a time, to a smooth paste.

Gradually whisk in the hot milk, pour everything back into the saucepan and cook over a high heat, stirring constantly, for about 5 mins until thick – it will go alarmingly lumpy but don’t worry, just keep stirring it vigorously with a wooden spoon until smooth

Lay a sheet of cling film directly on the custard surface, then cool and chill until you’re ready to fill the buns.

To make the choux buns, heat the oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Sift the flour with the sugar and a pinch of salt into a small bowl. Put the milk and butter into a medium saucepan with 125ml water and gently heat so the butter melts but the liquid doesn’t bubble.

Once the butter has completely melted, increase the heat until the liquid comes to a fast rolling boil. Immediately turn off the heat, tip in the sifted flour and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon until you a have a smooth dough that comes away from the sides of the pan. Spread over a large dinner plate to cool to hand temperature.

Allow to cool for a few minutes, then gradually add the eggs, mixing well between each addition until the mixture reluctantly drops off the spoon. Don’t add all the egg unless you need to.

Cut two large sheets of baking parchment. On each one draw two sets of ‘track’ lines with a 10cm gap – these will be your guidelines so your eclairs will all be roughly the same size. Use the paper to line two large baking sheets – penside down.

Spoon your choux mixture into a piping bag with a 1cm star or round wide nozzle, or into a disposable piping bag with a similar-size hole snipped off for piping. Pipe two rows of well-spaced, squashed ‘S’ shapes on each sheet between the guidelines. Bake, one tray at a time, on a high-ish shelf for 25 mins, reducing temperature to 200C/180C fan/gas 6 as soon as they go in the oven.

After 25 mins, poke a hole in the end of each bun, or using a small serrated knife, split down the middle and return to the oven, upside-down, to dry out for 5 mins until crisp and golden. Set aside to cool.

While the buns are cooling, finish your filling. Whisk the cream until thick, then use your electric whisk to beat the cooled, set custard until just smooth again. Fold in the cream. Spoon your filling into a piping bag – use a small nozzle if you’re filling the buns through the holes you've pierced, or a large nozzle if you’ve split the buns in half. Carefully pipe the custard into each cooled bun – they should feel heavy once full.

To make the icing, melt 100g plain chocolate and 25g butter together in a heatproof bowl over a pan of barely simmering water. Once melted, remove from the heat and stir in 75ml double cream and 1 tbsp sifted icing sugar. Once cooled a little, spread over the tops of the buns and leave to cool.


Reviews

Wanted to echo other folks who have said the dessert may be too sweet for some. A couple suggestions to cut the sweetness and let the chocolate shine. 1) Use only bittersweet dark chocolate, not semisweet. Despite its name, bittersweet chocolate is still 10% to 50% sugar content depending on the brand. 2) Use graham crackers or digestives for the crust in lieu of Oreos. 3) If you're trying to cut down on the dairy, replace the heavy whipping cream with a 50/50 mix of silken tofu and unsweetened soy milk. It's not exactly vegan because of the butter in the crust, but it will make the pie a little denser in mouth-feel. I'm personally a fan of a thicker mousse. Hope this helps!

As noted above, no need to use the food processor. Just chop the chocolate and use a whisk, when you pour in the hot cream. Worked great! So easy! Looks terrific and tastes amazing!

I think this one is a 3.5 although Epicurious does not allow for that rating. It's a lovely recipe - everyone in my family raved about it. It's easy enough to prepare and looks and tastes decadent. One issue that kept me from giving a full four forks was I found the dessert a tad too sweet, which took away from the chocolate flavor. I scraped off the cream in half the oreos here but the crust was still too sugary for me. Some other reviewers have been saying that as well. Next time I will go with Nabisco chocolate wafers for the crust or increase the number of oreos and scrape them all. I also felt I could have used half bittersweet and half semi sweet chocolate in the mousse, or maybe reduced the amount of sugar in the whipped cream. I'll try those adjustments next time. I also found that the mousse was quite thick which made it hard to pour. I had trouble getting the top even. Is that because I overworked the mousse? Any tips would be appreciated.

Best ever! Easy and delicious - the ONLY negative I have is that it is must be assembled several hours before serving. Also, lately I have been adding a dollop of Nutella - just to mix things up - but the original still hold a special place in my heart!

This is an impressive chocolate dessert. I don’t like super sweet desserts, so prefer chocolate wafers rather than filled oreos. I agree with another reviewer about using half semisweet and half bittersweet chocolate (block or bar chocolate rather than chips). I always throw in some espresso powder to help bring out the wonderfulness of the chocolate, maybe one T. in this recipe. I like to make a seedless raspberry sauce over the pie before adding some whipped cream, or put a “puddle” of it under each slice, along with a few fresh berries. In my opinion, this is more elegant made in a springform pan than in a pie plate. Thanks for a lovely recipe!

Made as written - it was rich but delicious!

Thanks James Cratin for a recipe that is still as easy, delicious, and crowd pleasing today (2018) as it was in 1992. I disagreed with two instructions, however: using room temperature butter in place of melted butter in the cookie crust (I used “Brussels” cookies by Pepperidge Farms), and using the food processor to melt and stir the chocolate. My issue with the latter step is the difficulty in getting all the melted chocolate off the sharp blade of the processor. Using my copper bowl, I poured the very hot cream over the chocolate and used a whisk to smooth it out. Easy peasy with no torn up spatula. I used 6 ounces of semisweet and 6 ounces of bittersweet chocolate. Also, I added instant espresso to the hot cream. In place of rosettes, I bathed the top of the pie with a thin layer of whipped cream and scattered shaved chocolate all over. I took this dessert to a small dinner party last night and everyone raved about it. The hostess—a fine baker and chocolate lover—asked for the recipe.

Great chocolate mousse recipe. I used Thin Mint Girl Scout cookies for the crust! So good!

I made this recipe for Valentine's Day for my chocolate-loving husband, and he really loved it! I used the thin Oreos, probably about 25. I liked using them because they don't have a lot of that super-sweet filling. They worked very well and the crust held together nicely after baking and assembling the whole dish. The filling is a great combination of light chocolate cream, like a silk. I served slices with raspberries for a freshness and another texture. Thanks for the recipe.

I made this tonight and my husband loved it! I made a couple of changes - I added cherry pie filling as a base layer, and I used a standard pie crust. I did have one issue with the method - for me running my food processor with the chocolate was a fail - my blade kept climbing up and then off the pin. So I'll be putting the chocolate and such into the pan with the hot cream and using a whisk. Or if I'm feeling lazy maybe my stand mixer. But definitely not a food processor.

OMG - made this for a huge bash and people DEVOURED it. Nothing left. Used Oreo THIN cookies as they are more or less pure chocolate. YUM! YUM! YUM!

Super simple. I created the crust with Double Stuff original OREOS and Double Stuff MINT Oreos, along w less than a pinch of salt as I use unsalted butter. This brings it all together and cuts the sweetness. I think may even mix some crunched up OREOS in the mousse next time. ( #OREOLOVER ) I would post the GREAT photo we took of this pie but alas Epi does not have this option. But trust us this thing is amazing with its balance of chocolate crunch, creamy chocolate mousse filling topped off with some lightly sweetened whipped cream and done. Make sure you have planned for a full house or you will finish the whole thing during your Netflix weekend binge safe inside the air conditioning.

Fantastic and easy. We don't like our desserts very sweet, so I used bittersweet chocolate (60%), less whipped cream in the filling, and less sugar in the whipped cream (reduced by about one-third). Topped with whipped cream rosettes and fresh raspberries. Perfect.

This is a great recipe, I have been making this for years. First when my son turned five, he has requested it for every birthday since, he turns 12 this week. The mousse it delicious and you can add or subtract the sugar to your preference, we like the oreo crust too.

The mousse in this chocolate mousse pie is absolutely fabulous. But I plead with you-do NOT use the oreo crust. Now don't get me wrong--I like oreos as much as the next person--but it is absolutely wrong for this dessert. Anything you put in an oreo crust will end up tasting like oreos. You may as well fill the oreo crust with straight whipped cream and it will taste the same as this chocolate mousse pie in an oreo crust. My suggestion: either just fill dessert glasses with the mousse and serve or use a regular pastry crust. This simple yet delicious mousse begs you to not ruin it by an overpowering oreo crust.

This is an easy, simple yet fabulous dessert. Made this for a Christmas dinner party and it was a big hit. Loved the texture, not a true mousse but delicious just the same!

I have been making this since it was first published in Bon Appetit in 1992. It has become a family favorite. I use the Nabisco chocolate wafer cookies as the crust, there are never any leftovers!

Folks, don't even bother making the crust. I have been making this mousse for years to rave reviews. It is so simple - don't beat the cream too stiff, fold in chocolate and top with raspberries. serve with whipped cream.

This recipe was decadent and delicious. It's also an easy recipe for those of us who have to eat gluten free and are tired of repeated gluten free baking debacles. I used Glutinos instead of Oreos and followed the rest of the recipe as written. Easy as (mousse) pie!

There are not enough superlatives to describe how delicious this pie is. If you like chocolate mousse, you will love this pie, especially the Oreo crust. This is a family favorite and a go to recipe if we want to impress guests. I¿d recommend adding a dollop of crème fresh to each slice.

So good and so easy-always a huge hit!!

A follow-up to my review of several years ago! My extended family demands I make this for major holidays 3x/year. Here's what I do, because I'm all about shortcuts. 1) Purchase 2 ready-made Oreo pie crusts instead of making them myself. The mousse easily whips up enough to fill both of them. 2) Use good-quality semi-sweet chips (1 bag) 3) Heat the first cup of cream in the microwave to boiling in a glass measuring cup (dirties fewer dishes) From start to finish (I've timed it!) this takes about 20 minutes (plus setting time) and is always a HUGE hit, whether with my family or if I make it for friends or other get-togethers. Love it!

This was so easy to make, easier than I expected! I made it for the people I work with and they raved about it. I gave them all the recipe. I then made it two days later for my relatives, who also raved over it. This will be my signature dish to bring over to someones house for dessert! I wasn't so good at decorating with the rosettes of cream on the top, so I just made my own design, and then shaved a chocolate bar. Wow. the look AND the taste!

This pie is crazy good and incredibly easy to make. Used chocolate teddy grahams to make the crust and made the whole thing the day before and added whip cream before serving. Fantastic!

I have been making this pie for years. My family demands it for any occasion! It is so easy and delicious. I use a 10oz bag of Ghiardelli dark chocolate chips and 1/2 a bag of semi-sweet chips for an extra rich and chocolatey pie. Yummy!


How To Make Chocolate Mousse

Chocolate mousse has very few ingredients so it’s important to use the best quality chocolate — its flavor will shine through. I like semi-sweet chocolate but if you prefer your mousse with a darker chocolate flavor, use bittersweet. Remember, the higher the cacao percentage, the less sweet the chocolate.

To begin, place the butter in a medium microwave-safe bowl. Break the chocolate into small pieces directly into the bowl (no need to chop it first and dirty a cutting board). Microwave it in 20-second intervals, stirring between each bout of heat, until the chocolate is about 75% melted. Stir, allowing the residual heat in the bowl to melt the chocolate completely. This prevents the chocolate from scorching.

(Alternatively, place the chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl and place over a saucepan containing about 1 inch of barely simmering water. Stir with a wooden spoon until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth.)

Let the mixture cool for a few minutes, then whisk in the egg yolks one at a time, mixing until smooth after each addition.

In another medium bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and beat until soft peaks form (the peaks should be just starting to hold, and will melt back into themselves after a second).

Gradually beat in 1/4 cup of the sugar and continue beating until stiff peaks form (the peaks will stand straight up when the beaters are lifted from the mixture).

Using a large rubber spatula, fold the egg white mixture into the chocolate mixture.

Mix only until uniform, then set aside.

In another bowl, beat the heavy cream until it begins to thicken up. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar and the vanilla.

Continue beating until the cream holds medium peaks.

Add the whipped cream into the chocolate mixture.

Gently fold the cream into the chocolate mixture, making sure not to mix any more than necessary.

Divide the mousse between 6 individual glasses, cover, and chill until set, at least 2 hours.

Up to a few hours before serving, whip the cream until it begins to thicken. Add the sugar and whip to medium peaks. Dollop the whipped cream over the mousse and top with chocolate shavings.


I'd love to try Goldman's recipe again

After my first attempt at Goldman's recipe, I learned that I needed to cook the filling a little more and let it chill longer. But the pie's flavor was so good that I'm willing to try this recipe again.

Plus this pie really is a showstopper with all of the decorations on top.

That being said, in a pinch, I'd happily whip up Lagasse's chocolate filling and put it in a store-bought chocolate crumb crust for a decadent dessert with less effort.


Moo-less chocolate mousse

(or pudding, if you prefer)

grain-free • gluten-free • dairy-free • sugar-free* • nut-free • nightshade-free • 21DSD

PREP TIME: 10 minutes
COOKING TIME: n/a
YIELD: 2 servings
NUTRITION INFO: Click here.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 2 ripe bananas (use green-tipped/under ripe if on the 21DSD)
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cacao powder
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • pinch of cinnamon – optional
  • pinch of sea salt – optional
  • 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup (*do notuse this if on the 21DSD)
  • 1 tablespoon cacao nibs or grated 100% dark chocolate, for garnish

Preparation:

  • Scoop out the flesh of the avocados into a food processor and add all of the other ingredients except your garnish. Process until well blended and creamy/smooth. You may whisk the ingredients together vigorously as well, if necessary or you don't have a food processor.
  • Serve in individual dishes or bowls. Garnish with with cacao nibs or grated 100% dark chocolate (pictured), toasted hazelnuts, or coconut.

Try this out and let me know what your favorite way to make it is!

Yes, you can enjoy this recipe while on the 21-Day Sugar Detox.

For more The 21-Day Sugar Detox friendly recipes, check out The Food Lovers Kitchen, Chowstalker, and The Foodee.

Note: I earn a small commission if you use the links in this post to purchase the products mentioned. I only recommend products I would use myself or that I recommend for clients in my practice or at workshops. Your purchase helps support my work in bringing you real information about nutrition and health.