Other

Quick-Pickled Mangos with Tender Greens


Quick-Pickled Mangos with Tender Greens

A quick pickle gives the mangos in this salad an addictive and pleasant bite. Try this tonight.

Ingredients

For the pickled mangos

  • 2 large ripe mangos, peeled, pitted and chopped into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 sprigs tarragon
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 1/2 Teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 Cups rice vinegar
  • 1/3 Cup water
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt

For the salad

  • 1/4 Cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 8 Cups salad greens, such as arugula, tatsoi, or a mesclun mix
  • 1 small fennel bulb, cored and sliced thinly lengthwise
  • 4 ounces chèvre, crumbled

Servings4

Calories Per Serving348

Folate equivalent (total)118µg30%

Riboflavin (B2)0.3mg15.6%


Each kitchen is run by its own chef, who holds your food to a higher standard. We explore local markets and experiment with ingredients to create distinctive plates you’ll love.

DAILY CREATIONS TO CRAVE

Every chef makes a special daily dish for their location only. These Chef's Specials are guided by seasonal flavors, grown by local farmers and inspired by personal tastes.

FOOD TRANSFORMS LIVES

We believe that food is an agent for change. From innovative urban agriculture partnerships to a unique culinary internship program that supports foster youth—we bring it all to the table.


Salmon with Chenin Blanc

Raised in New York by an American Jewish father and a Peruvian mother, chef Mina Newman grew up on the foods of Peru. "I think the most we got of our Jewish heritage was having bagels and lox on Sunday," she quips. Her mother cooked staples like arroz con pollo, ceviche and papa a la huancaína, potatoes topped with spiced cream sauce.

But she often incorporated Japanese elements too. "We always had soy sauce at home we always had ginger," Newman recalls. Her mother would stir Peruvian seaweed into water to create a sort of dashi, the Japanese broth base, adding it to her ceviche for depth.

Only later did Newman learn there was a name for this pidgin cuisine: Nikkei. A Japanese diaspora to Peru that began in 1899 led to Japanese immigrants preparing Peruvian foods using their native techniques. "Their cuisines have a lot of similarities," Newman notes. "High fish, high rice, a lot of starch." Ceviche as we know it is the most visible emblem of Nikkei influence: Generations of Peruvians marinated raw fish overnight until Japanese transplants taught them to treat it more delicately, tossing it with citrus just before serving.

Newman takes exception whenever the cuisine is labeled "fusion," evoking the faddish Asian-with-a-twist dining of the aughts. Instead, she compares it to the New York bagel, believed to have resulted from 19th-century Polish émigrés making an old-country staple using the traditional method—boiling—but in New York's mineral-rich, gluten-strengthening water. "Now we consider that just a native New Yorker food," she says.

Sen Sakana, a winner of Wine Spectator's Best of Award of Excellence, became New York's first Nikkei restaurant when it opened in 2017. Newman acknowledges that earlier places had included certain Nikkei elements for instance, Nobu's thin slices of raw fish with rocoto chile, onions and yuzu, a variation of its signature "new-style sashimi," was tiradito by another name. But Sen Sakana was the first in the city to wave the flag. Today, it offers reimagined Nikkei dishes like the salmon shown here, served with asparagus, mango miso puree and lightly pickled mangoes.

Wine director Zachary Gross opts for a dry Chenin Blanc from the Loire Valley to stand up to the fatty, sweet fish, minerally miso and luscious mango. With "tons of minerality, peach, green apple, crushed stone and herbs," the Château Yvonne Saumur White 2015 makes a fine balance with the rich, tropical dish.

Chef’s Notes

Just when you thought salmon had gotten boring, this head-turning recipe came along to brighten up your week. Read on for Newman’s tips on how to bring this lively number into tune with your particular preferences.

Ask your fishmonger about salmon belly. Though this recipe works beautifully with the ubiquitous salmon fillet, Newman says you can elevate your game by instead buying salmon belly, which is richer and more tender than fillet. If your fishmonger sells the belly, go for it. If not, Newman suggests asking for fillets cut from as close to the belly as possible. “That’s really delicious, really fatty you almost can’t overcook it, so it’s perfect for the home cook,” she says.

Make this today, but bookmark the page for stone fruit season too. Newman loves the versatility of the marinade, which can support plenty of other fruits besides mango. “You need something creamy and dense-textured,” she advises. Apples and pear will be too grainy, but as the weather continues to warm, peaches and nectarines will both make for good substitutes. The tropical fruit cherimoya, often sold in the United States as custard apple, is also great if you can find it, with a smooth texture and a unique flavor profile that calls to mind pineapple, mango and strawberry. Newman does warn that the puree of sweeter fruits, like peaches, will change the flavor balance of the marinade, so if you’re using one of those, start off with less than the stated 2/3 cup and then add more to taste. Speaking of which …

Taste as you go. The marinade should taste strong but good this recipe is a solid guide, but exact proportions are really up to you. “Don’t get so hung up on measuring everything so perfectly,” Newman counsels. “You can eyeball it.” If it’s too sweet or too sour, adjust accordingly. She suggests going ahead and combining the full 1/2 cup each of miso paste and mirin and the 2 tablespoons soy sauce, plus the 2/3 cup mango puree (or a bit less if it’s a sweeter fruit), then adding the sake in smaller increments in order to control the degree of strength. After that point, you can add more of anything to taste.

The marinade does much of the work for you. Once the marinade is tasting good and you have introduced it to the fish, it will infuse the salmon flesh with flavor and moisture, guarding against overcooking. “On the outside, [the fish] actually develops a little bit of a skin” when you pull it from the marinade, Newman explains, helping to keep the interior tender.

Go easy when cooking the salmon fillets. Salmon is one of those proteins that can feel all too easy to over- or undercook. “Visually, you never want to see the albumen from the salmon, the white stuff,” which tells you the fish has gone too far, she says. “Texturally, it should still feel soft and spongy if you want it to be medium-rare.” To accomplish this, she suggests cooking it on medium heat, which will make for a relatively slow process that’s less likely to get away from you.

Or, try this one weird trick. If you like your fish at medium or medium-well doneness, Newman has a tip: Once it’s at that spongy medium-rare stage, cover the pan and turn off the heat, then leave it on the burner for about 7 minutes. This should take the fish to a firmer state of doneness without overdoing it. “You’re containing the residual heat that’s inside, and then just leave it there until you’re ready to serve,” she says. “And it’s good too: You also want it to rest. Similar to meat, you don’t want to cut right into it.” If you’re happy with the doneness you achieve by following the recipe without employing the covering-the-pan move, she suggests letting the fish rest off the heat for 5 minutes—just long enough to take off your apron, pour some wine and call everyone to the table.

Pairing Tip: Why Chenin Blanc Works with This Dish

To pair with this brightly flavored springtime salmon, look for a medium- to full-bodied white that has good acidity and combines fruitiness and minerality with touches of herb, such as a Chenin Blanc from the Loire Valley or South Africa’s Stellenbosch region.

Mango Miso Salmon with Asparagus and Quick-Pickled Mango

Recipe courtesy of chef Mina Newman and tested by Wine Spectator’s Julie Harans.

Ingredients

  • 3 mangoes, peeled and pitted (divided use)
  • 1/2 cup white miso paste
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons mirin (divided use)
  • 3/4 cup cooking sake (divided use)
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • Four 6- to 7-ounce salmon fillets (or pieces of salmon belly), skin on
  • 2 tablespoons unseasoned rice wine vinegar
  • 2 bunches asparagus, about 60 stalks total, tough ends trimmed
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Preparation

1. Roughly dice 2 mangoes and add them to the bowl of a food processor or blender. Puree until smooth you should have nearly 1 cup of puree. In a medium bowl, combine miso paste, 1/2 cup mirin, 2/3 cup mango puree, 1/2 cup sake and soy sauce. Whisk until thoroughly combined and smooth. Transfer half the marinade to a separate bowl and add 2 tablespoons mirin and remaining mango puree (you should have about 1/4 cup), stirring until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator. Place the salmon in a medium-size glass dish and cover with the remaining marinade. Cover with plastic wrap, transfer to the refrigerator and let chill for 24 hours, turning once.

2. Transfer the reserved marinade to a medium saucepot and heat over medium, uncovered. Cook until reduced enough to coat the back of a spoon, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cover pan and set aside.

3. Dice remaining mango. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup sake, rice wine vinegar and 1/2 cup mirin, stirring to combine. Stir in the diced mango. Let sit for 15 minutes, then drain, discarding liquid.

4. Remove salmon from refrigerator and blot excess marinade. Place fish in a clean dish until ready to cook.

5. Preheat the oven to 375° F. Toss the asparagus with olive oil, salt and pepper to lightly coat the stalks and place on a foil-lined sheet pan large enough to fit them all in a single layer. Transfer to the oven and roast for 10 to 15 minutes or until slightly crispy. Remove and cover with aluminum foil to keep warm.

6. Place a cold nonstick pan on medium heat, then immediately add the canola oil and butter. As soon as the butter has melted, add the fish. Cook, skin-side down, until skin is lightly browned and easily releases from the pan, about 5 minutes. Carefully flip fillets and cook on flesh side, 3 minutes more, until lightly browned and cooked through. If all four fillets do not fit comfortably in the pan, cook two at a time, then transfer to a plate and cover with aluminum foil to keep warm while you cook the other two.

7. While the salmon is cooking, reheat the saucepot of reserved sauce over low.

8. Evenly distribute the asparagus among four dinner plates. Place a salmon fillet on each plate, top with 2 to 3 tablespoons of the sauce and garnish with the diced, quick-pickled mango. Serves 4.


Quick Pickled Green Strawberries

Play around with the flavorings as you wish. Lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves? Star anise and fresh ginger root? Just make sure to let the brine cool before you add it to the berries, as you want them to stay firm rather than mushy.

    Ingredients
  • 1 pint green strawberries, hulled and halved or quartered
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar, champagne vinegar, or unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 3 TB granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 fresh tarragon sprig, 1 leafy fennel frond, or 1 fresh bay leaf
  • 1/4 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 long spiral of fresh lime, lemon, or orange peel
    Preparation
  1. Combine water, vinegar, sugar, salt, tarragon, spices, and rind in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve salt and sugar. Remove from heat and let cool to lukewarm.
  2. Pour brine over strawberries. Cover and refrigerate overnight before serving. Will keep, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

Cress, Asparagus and Mango Salad with Chia

It’s almost, almost asparagus season in Minnesota, so I just had to jump when this gorgeous purple asparagus appeared at the Coop. It was teasing me with a preview of the spears certain to arrive in the coming weeks, freshly cut, from our local farms.

I figured I should put up a recipe for the big day when our own super-fresh asparagus bursts out of the ground. The cress and mangoes were also looking good, and I was craving a really sweet and tangy salad, with fruit.

So my stroll through the produce section sparked a composition in food, and I had little say in the matter. This salad just had to happen.

I’m deliberately using the word Cress here, since I used a plant called Upland Cress and not true watercress. Upland Cress is a similar tasting leafy green that is much easier to grow and harvest then traditional watercress. The name is a giveaway, as watercress grows in ponds and streams, and is often wild-crafted. Upland Cress is easy to grow in a garden or pot, given enough moisture. The lovely long stems make for a pretty salad, and make picking the leaves much easier than plucking all the leaves from regular watercress.

The distinctive flavor of watercress is peppery and strong, and Upland Cress is definitely milder. It still delivers some punch, making it a great foil for the assertively tangy mango dressing and purple asparagus in this dish.

The nutrition is similar, both plants are superfoods, delivering vitamins A C E, Folic Acid and Calcium and Iron. If cress seems too punchy for your palate, you can always mix it with some butter lettuce or spinach, for a toned down experience.

It’s still deliciously in-your-face, and I love that about it.

The Ataulfo Mangoes have been booming lately, too, they are the yellow variety that you sometimes see labeled as Champagne Mangoes. They are about 3/4 size of the standard Haden mango, and have a more creamy texture, depending on when you cut into them. They seem to arrive a little riper and less rock hard than the big kind, and always deliver tons of flavor. Of course, the sensuous mango is a super food, too.

Don’t let anyone tell you salads are boring. This baby is full of excitement.

Cress, Asparagus and Mango Salad with Chia

This makes extra dressing, which is good, since you will want to use it for salads for the rest of the week. You could certainly make more of a meal of it by adding some nuts, crumbled tofu, or cheese.

2 medium Ataulfo (Champagne) Mangos

2 tablespoons sliced fresh ginger

1-2 tablespoons lemon juice

3 tablespoons honey or agave

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 bunch Upland cress, washed and dried

2 tablespoons minced red onions

First, steam the asparagus just a couple of minutes, just to soften slightly. Rinse with cold water and chill.

In the blender, combine half of a mango, the ginger, lemon, honey or agave, olive oil, and salt. Puree.

On each plate, spread cress leaves. Frame the salad with asparagus spears, and arrange the remaining mango over the cress. Sprinkle with red onion, drizzle with dressing, and sprinkle with chia seeds.


Servings Serves 4 to 6 (makes 9 cups)

Amount Per Serving Calories 127 Calories from Fat 65 % Daily Value * Total Fat 9.2g 15 % Saturated Fat 1.1g 6 % Cholesterol 0.0mg 0 % Sodium 180mg 8 % Total Carbohydrate 11g 4 % Dietary Fiber 5.7g 23 % Protein 3.7g 8 %

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


Recipe: Harissa Falafel Wrap With Quick-Pickled Cabbage

If you’re looking for fresh lunchtime inspiration for spring, this recipe from The Vegetarian Kitchen is full of flavour and nourishing ingredients. You can also save time and make these falafels in bulk, so your lunches are prepared for a few days.

“This is a wrap even non-vegans can enjoy without feeling as though anything is missing – the falafels are packed full of flavour, and the pickled cabbage perfectly complements them. I never used to be a fan of pickles, and I still run a mile from a gherkin, so if you are like me, please give this pickle a chance the cabbage is crunchy and zingy and nothing like the floppy grey-green things you find on a burger.”

SERVES 4
4 soft tortilla wraps
2 baby gem lettuces, washed and chopped
1 avocado, halved, stoned, peeled and sliced

FOR THE QUICK-PICKLED CABBAGE
125ml apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp caster sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp yellow mustard seeds
1⁄2 tsp black peppercorns
1 shallot, thinly sliced
200g red cabbage, thickly sliced

FOR THE FALAFELS
50G quinoa (dry weight)
240g tinned chickpeas, drained
1 tbsp harissa paste
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1⁄2 tsp ground coriander
1⁄2 tsp ground cumin
11⁄2 tbsp plain flour plus extra for coating
1⁄2 tsp baking powder
1 small onion, roughly chopped
a handful of flat-leaf parsley, stems removed
a handful of coriander, stems removed
5 tsp vegetable oil for frying
salt and pepper to season

FOR THE TAHINI DRESSING
2 tbsp tahini
2 tsp lemon juice
1⁄2 tsp white wine vinegar

SERVES 4
4 soft tortilla wraps
2 baby gem lettuces, washed and chopped
1 avocado, halved, stoned, peeled and sliced

FOR THE QUICK-PICKLED CABBAGE
125ml apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp caster sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp yellow mustard seeds
1⁄2 tsp black peppercorns
1 shallot, thinly sliced
200g red cabbage, thickly sliced

FOR THE FALAFELS
50G quinoa (dry weight)
240g tinned chickpeas, drained
1 tbsp harissa paste
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1⁄2 tsp ground coriander
1⁄2 tsp ground cumin
11⁄2 tbsp plain flour plus extra for coating
1⁄2 tsp baking powder
1 small onion, roughly chopped
a handful of flat-leaf parsley, stems removed
a handful of coriander, stems removed
5 tsp vegetable oil for frying
salt and pepper to season

FOR THE TAHINI DRESSING
2 tbsp tahini
2 tsp lemon juice
1⁄2 tsp white wine vinegar

METHOD

1. To make the pickling liquor for the cabbage, combine the apple cider vinegar, sugar, salt, mustard seeds and peppercorns in a small saucepan with 125ml water and bring to the boil. Remove from the heat as soon as it boils. Put the shallot and cabbage into a clean, heatproof jar, then pour the hot pickling liquor over it and press the cabbage down to ensure it’s all submerged. Leave it to cool, then seal with a lid and refrigerate it for at least a few hours, ideally overnight.

2. To make the falafels, cook the quinoa in a large pan of boiling water for 10 minutes or until the quinoa is tender. Drain and allow it to cool.

3. Put the chickpeas, harissa paste, garlic, spices, flour, baking powder, onion and herbs in a food processor and blitz until smooth, adding a tablespoon of warm water if it is dry and crumbly. Keep adding warm water, a tablespoon at a time, blitzing between additions, until you have a paste that will hold together (you may need up to 6 tablespoons).

4. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, then stir in the quinoa, season to taste with salt and pepper, and chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

5. To make the tahini dressing, combine all the ingredients with 3 tablespoons of warm water in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. Season to taste.

6. Using clean hands, take egg-sized lumps of the falafel mixture into your hands and shape them into patties (the mixture should make around twelve). Press them together, then roll them gently in flour – they will be fragile, so handle them with care.

7. Heat the vegetable oil in a heavy-based frying pan over a medium high heat, then fry the falafels, carefully flipping them over halfway through cooking, until they are golden brown on both sides. Transfer to a plate lined with kitchen paper to soak up any excess oil.

8. To assemble the wraps, spread a generous spoonful of the tahini dressing on each wrap, then divide the lettuce, avocado and falafels between them. Add some pickled cabbage to each, then drizzle over a little extra tahini dressing. Wrap them up tightly and serve immediately.


This stir-fry gets its hit of green from bok choy and mizuna, a Japanese salad green.

Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Epicurious may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


  • 4 quarts green tomatoes (sliced and loosely packed)
  • 1 quart onion (sliced and loosely packed)
  • 1 cup pickling salt (divided)
  • 2 pounds light brown sugar
  • 6 cups vinegar (5% acidity)
  • 2 small red chile peppers
  • 1/3 cup mustard seeds
  • 1/4 cup celery seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon whole allspice
  • 2 teaspoons whole cloves

Place sliced tomatoes and sliced onion in separate bowls. Sprinkle 3/4 cup salt over tomatoes and 1/4 cup salt over onion. Stir both mixtures.

Cover both bowls and let stand at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours.

Place the tomatoes in a cheesecloth bag and squeeze gently to remove excess juice.

Repeat this procedure for the onion. Discard the salt liquid.

Combine tomatoes, onion, brown sugar, vinegar, chile peppers, mustard seeds, celery seeds, and pepper in a large kettle.

Tie allspice and cloves in a small cheesecloth bag add to tomato-onion mixture.

Bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Pack tomato mixture and liquid into hot sterilized pint jars (with 1 piece of the chile pepper in each jar—cut if necessary), leaving 1/2-inch headspace wipe jar rims.

Cover at once with metal lids, and screw on ring bands. Process in a boiling water bath 10 minutes.

Store in a cool dark place. Once opened, store pickles in the refrigerator. Makes four 1-pint jars.