Other

A Canada Pizza Shop Illegally Sold Alcohol in Pizza Boxes


Police confiscated 240 cans of beer and 100 bottles of various spirits

There was more than just pizza in those boxes.

A pizzeria in Edmonton, Alberta, was forced to shut down for a day after police discovered that the restaurant was illegally delivering alcohol in pizza boxes after hours.

Officers were tipped off over the summer that the Canadian restaurant did not have a liquor license and was illegally storing and selling alcohol in anchovy containers. They issued a search warrant in September and found “a substantial amount of alcohol” inside pizza boxes, according to CBC News. The alcohol was stored in pre-packaged brown paper bags in the delivery cars.

Police confiscated 240 cans of beer and 100 bottles of various spirits. It looks like the pizza shop was selling bottles of Captain Morgan and Budweiser from a photo released by the Edmonton Police Service.

It’s unclear why the restaurant did not obtain a liquor license or what they were doing with the money from the alcohol. Four employees at the pizzeria received a provincial summons under the Gaming and Liquor Act.


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


The production and sales of processed foods is governed by state and federal regulations. Each state is different, so proper advice is needed from a specialist in each state. Some states allow sales at farmer's markets of select foods others prohibit sales altogether these are called cottage food laws. These rules might also be called Home-Food Processing Rules or Baker's Bills. Typically, the department of health (or the department of agriculture) approves and oversees cottage food businesses. Most states now have these cottage food laws now that don't require a licensed kitchen. In those states, you can sell at a farmers market or roadside stand jams and jellies as well as baked goods that don't require refrigeration. For this you don't need a licensed kitchen or any inspections. Typically, in those states, you just need to label them with the weight or volume, our name, our address, the words "this item is home produced" and all the ingredients in order by weight. Usually, you can not do anything 'acidified' (like pickles), anything pressure canned, or anything needing refrigeration. While Cottage Food laws allow a person to legally bake and prepare certain foods in their home kitchens and sell them on a small scale, (typically at farmers markets and direct to other consumers), very few states allow them to sell to restaurants and grocery stores.

Don't give up. You may still be able to make and sell it commercially, through a startup approach.

First, you might be able to rent space in a local licensed commercial kitchen.

Second, if that doesn't work, you may be able to find a co-packer to make the food for you.

For Cottage food laws in other countries, see:


Watch the video: Πίτσα Ελληνική σε ξυλόφουρνο Homemade Greek pizza in a wood oven (October 2021).