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Banh-mi style vegetarian Vietnamese baguette recipe


  • Recipes
  • Diet & lifestyle
  • Vegetarian
  • Vegetarian meals
  • Vegetarian lunch

These are by far the best sandwiches to serve your guests and yourself! The ingredients are fresh, delicious, popular and fills your mouth with marinated joy. This is my hearty vegetarian version (if you do not use fish sauce) using mushrooms.

35 people made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 2 large portobello mushroom caps, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 carrot, sliced into matchsticks
  • 1 mooli (white) radish, sliced into matchsticks
  • 250ml rice vinegar
  • 125ml fresh lime juice
  • 125ml cold water
  • 125ml chilled lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon nuoc mam (Vietnamese fish sauce)
  • 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons rapeseed oil
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 5 tablespoons caster sugar
  • 5 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 fresh jalapeno or green chilli, thinly sliced
  • 8 sprigs fresh coriander with stems
  • 1 medium cucumber, sliced into thin strips
  • 2 sprigs fresh Thai basil
  • 2 (18cm) French baguettes, split lengthways

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:25min ›Extra time:15min marinating › Ready in:1hr

  1. Preheat the oven to 230 C / Gas 8. Place the mushrooms on a baking tray. Drizzle with a little olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the preheated oven for about 25 minutes. Cool slightly, then slice into strips.
  2. While the mushrooms are roasting, bring a saucepan of water to the boil. Plunge the carrot and mooli matchsticks into the boiling water and after a few seconds, remove them and plunge them into a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. In a separate bowl, stir together the rice vinegar, 125ml of lime juice and 125ml cold water. Transfer the carrot and radish to the vinegar and lime marinade and let them soak for at least 15 minutes, longer if it's convenient.
  3. In a small bowl, stir together the remaining lime juice, soy sauce, fish sauce, sesame oil, rapeseed oil, 5 tablespoons sugar and 5 tablespoons water. This is the sandwich sauce.
  4. To assemble sandwiches, sprinkle a little of the sandwich sauce onto each half of the French loaves. Place the roasted mushrooms onto the bottom half of each roll and sprinkle with a little more sauce. Top with a few slices of green chilli, a few sticks of carrot and radish (minus the marinade), cucumber, basil and coriander. Close with the tops of the bread and serve.

Vegetarian tip

To make this dish truly vegetarian, either omit the fish sauce or use a vegetarian fish sauce in its place.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(39)

Reviews in English (31)

Just so you know, adding fish sauce generally makes a recipe not vegetarian.-26 Sep 2013

Assembling is easy - but the preparation took a while. You can use leftover radish and carrots for other Vietnamese dish, such as rice noodle bowl with grilled chicken or pork.-22 Aug 2012

by judymayree

I have been eating Vietnamese sandwiches for a quarter of a century and this is by far the best recipe I have ever found for them. I have made them with bot portabello mushrooms and BBQ pork steaks sliced into thin strips. My sisters and I get together to make them every couple months and like tamales we make them in dozens for our family and friends to enjoy.-10 Mar 2009


“Vegánh Mi” (Vegan Vietnamese Bánh Mi Sandwich)

For my money, the bánh mi is the best sandwich in the world. It’s spicy, sweet, sour, crunchy, hot, cold, and mostly it’s just delicious, a mix of Vietnamese and French ingredients and cuisines, and maybe the silver lining to the French colonization of Vietnam. (Though that’s easy for me to say. This is an excellent piece about the history of the sandwich, and also a master recipe for a non-plant-based version.)

At any rate, a lot of planning went into creating a vegan version of the classic bánh mi sandwich, and that started with figuring out what makes a bánh mi a bánh mi (you can find a neat graphic here), and how those components could be made plant-based. So here goes:

1. The bread has to be a baguette. It’s part of the whole French legacy, and you need that crispy outside and soft interior that you get from a toasted baguette. Don’t get anything too “artisanal” – it shouldn’t be too chewy or thick-crusted. If there’s an Vietnamese bakery nearby, that’s ideal (as are bolillo rolls from a Mexican bakery), but even the Safeway baguette used here did the trick. (If you’re so inclined, here’s a recipe for making your own Vietnamese baguette.)

2. There’s typically one or two kinds of meat in there – cha lua, a steamed pork roll, and ham or barbecued pork of some kind. (Or grilled chicken, or beef, or pretty much anything.) I went with a basic Japanese-style broiled eggplant, and lightly fried tofu slices coated in the same sesame-oil-and-soy-sauce mixture as the eggplant. Both have some bite, and contrasting textures.

3. Pâté is essential – usually it’s made with pork or chicken liver (or both), so this uses a simple mushroom and walnut pâté.

4. As far as garnishes, you need pickled daikon and carrots and cilantro sliced jalapeños (or Thai bird chiles) and cucumber aren’t as necessary, but it’s not like they’re bad things in there.

5. Again with the French influence, a bánh mi needs mayonnaise, or some kind of creamy spread. And while you can use Vegenaise here, mashed-up avocado gives the same fatty contrast to the pickled vegetables and savory fillings. A squirt of sriracha’s nice, too.

So anyway, that’s where this all came from. But in the end, there are more things you can put in a bánh mi than things you can’t. As long as you keep with the basic formula of bánh mi = baguette, savory filling, pâté, fat-based spread (mayo/avocado), pickled vegetables, and cilantro, you can customize to your heart’s content. Whether you use these fillings or something entirely different, let us know how you make yours!

Ingredients

  • 2 6-inch baguette sections
  • 2 1/4-inch slices from a block of firm tofu (put the block down flat and run the knife through parallel to the cutting board)
  • 2 1/4-inch rounds eggplant
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon neutral (vegetable, canola, grapeseed) oil
  • 1/2 avocado, mashed to a paste with a little salt
  • a few slices of jalapeño
  • 2 1/8-inch wide, 6-inch long slice of cucumber
  • a few sprigs of cilantro
  • sriracha (or other chili sauce), to taste

Method

Step 1

Preheat the broiler. Put two sheets of paper towel on a plate, put the tofu on top of the towels, top with another two sheets of paper towel, and top with another plate. Set aside for around 10 minutes while the broiler heats up.

Step 2

In a wide, shallow bowl, whisk together the sesame oil and soy sauce. Turn the eggplant slices in the mixture to coat, then transfer to a baking sheet lined with a rack. Broil for around 4 minutes a side, or until tender and golden on each side. Set aside and let cool.

Step 3

Meanwhile, blot the tofu slices dry with paper towels, then pour the remaining sesame oil and soy sauce over them, and turn to coat. Heat the neutral oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, and, when the oil's hot, add the tofu to the pan. Fry for a few minutes per side, or until golden brown. Transfer to paper towels to drain and cool.

Step 4

Heat the oven to 300 degrees. Slice the baguette sections open like a book, so that one edge is still attached, and put on a baking sheet. Cut the eggplant slices in half, and cut the tofu slices in half lengthwise. For each sandwich, spread some of the avocado on one half of the bread, and some mushroom pâté on the other half. Top one half with the tofu slices and the other half with the eggplant slices. Put in the oven and toast for around 5 minutes.

Step 5

Remove from the oven and top each sandwich with some of the pickled carrots and daikon, jalapeño slices, one slice of cucumber, cilantro sprigs, and Sriracha to taste. Serve immediately.


1) Xoi Chay

Rice is a staple Vietnamese food. Xoi Chay or Sticky Rice can be practically had with anything - meat or vegetables. Xoi Chay is made by cooking rice and slicing the cooked rice into flat round shapes. After this dries, the slices of steamed rice are fried in hot oil pan until they turn yellow and crisp. The vegetarian version of Xoi Chay is generally served with items as diverse as chickpeas, coconut, sugar, mushrooms, broccoli, pepper, red chilli and onion. Xoi Chay can be found at every street corner and costs around VND 10,000.

Xoi Chay, Sticky rice with an assortment of Vietnamese vegetables (Source)


A staple of Vietnamese diet

The very first thing about “banh mi Vietnam” that amazes foreign travelers is that they can hardly find Vietnamese-style baguette in a shiny shop, in which cakes and fancy Western bread with pretty high price are displayed for sale.

Banh mi Vietnam can be purchased right at the roadside stalls or from the street vendors, in many the alleys of the city or even in the bus terminals and train station. Small freshly hot baguettes are kept warm in the red hot coal brazier or inside the bamboo basket fully covered with a woolen blanket.
Photo: thethaovanhoa.vn

Not only foreigners feel nostalgic when hearing the voices of street vendors resounding on every alley of Hanoi “Crisply hot bread for sale! Crisply hot bread for sale” (Bánh mì nóng giòn nào!) but Vietnamese loves that as well.

Years ago, when Hanoi was quieter, the cry of the street vendors is considered a symbol of tranquility. Even now, it still invokes special feelings among Hanoians, especially those who come back to visit Hanoi after a long time living far away from the city. Those sellers have become a typical image of the good old days, of the past full of unforgettable memories.
Photo: toplist.vn

“Banh mi Viet Nam” is also special for its diverse tastes. Those who have taken a bite of Vietnamese baguette will never forget the crunchiness of the crust since it is very light, airy and crispy. Bakers making Vietnamese-style baguette does not add butter, shortening or chicken fat. The dough contains only wheat, rice flour and quick-rise yeast. “Banh mi Viet Nam” has a pretty low price, only VND2000-VND3000 per loaf, which answers the question why Vietnamese rarely bake their own bread at home.

Vietnamese baguette is also very versatile, and it can be served any time of the day. Moreover, depending on their personal taste, people can enjoy their Banh mi in their own way: with fried eggs, liver pâté, mayonnaise or even condensed milk. There are many “versions” of “banh mi Viet Nam” that each area has its individually famous kind, which can even stunningly astonish Western travellers coming from the motherland of bread.


Vietnamese-Style Vegetable Sandwiches

Tonight’s hearty vegetarian sandwiches take their irresistible flavors from a Vietnamese favorite: bánh mì. Between slices of the traditional crunchy baguette, a tender layer of ginger-sautéed mushrooms finds refreshing contrast in tangy-sweet marinated carrots and cucumber—all brought together with spicy sriracha mayonnaise. For our side, we’re roasting gai lan until the leaves turn slightly crispy, then dressing it with the flavorful marinade from our vegetables.

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title
  • 2 Small Baguettes
  • 2 Carrots
  • 1 bunch Gai Lan
  • 1 Kirby Cucumber
  • 2 Tbsps Rice Vinegar
  • 2 tsps Sugar
  • 1 1-Inch Piece Ginger
  • 1½ Tbsps Sriracha
  • 1 tsp White Sesame Seeds
  • ¼ cup Mayonnaise
  • ½ lb Cremini Mushrooms

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Cut off and discard the bottom inch of the gai lan stems. Halve each piece lengthwise through the stem. Quarter the mushrooms. Peel and roughly chop the ginger. Halve the baguettes.Thinly slice the cucumber into rounds. Peel the carrots and grate on the large side of a box grater. In a medium bowl, combine the cucumber, carrots, sugar, and vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside to marinate, stirring occasionally, for at least 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

While the vegetables marinate, line a sheet pan with aluminum foil. Place the gai lan on the prepared sheet pan drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to thoroughly coat. Arrange in an even layer. Roast, stirring halfway through, 12 to 14 minutes, or until lightly browned and tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven. Reserving the marinating liquid, drain the marinated vegetables. Top the roasted gai lan with the reserved marinating liquid. Carefully stir to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate and set aside in a warm place. Remove and discard the foil from the sheet pan.

While the gai lan roasts, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the mushrooms cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned and slightly softened. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until browned. Add the ginger season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant. Turn off the heat season with salt and pepper to taste.

While the mushrooms cook, in a bowl, combine the mayonnaise and as much of the sriracha as you'd like, depending on how spicy you'd like the dish to be. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Place the baguettes on the same sheet pan, cut side up. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toast in the oven 4 to 6 minutes, or until the edges are lightly browned. Remove from the oven and carefully transfer to a cutting board.

Spread the sriracha mayonnaise onto the cut sides of the toasted baguettes. Top the baguette bottoms with the cooked mushrooms and marinated vegetables (you may have extra vegetables). Complete the sandwiches with the baguette tops. Cut in half on an angle. Divide the sandwiches and dressed gai lan between 2 dishes. Garnish the gai lan with the sesame seeds. Enjoy!

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Preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Cut off and discard the bottom inch of the gai lan stems. Halve each piece lengthwise through the stem. Quarter the mushrooms. Peel and roughly chop the ginger. Halve the baguettes.Thinly slice the cucumber into rounds. Peel the carrots and grate on the large side of a box grater. In a medium bowl, combine the cucumber, carrots, sugar, and vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside to marinate, stirring occasionally, for at least 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

While the vegetables marinate, line a sheet pan with aluminum foil. Place the gai lan on the prepared sheet pan drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to thoroughly coat. Arrange in an even layer. Roast, stirring halfway through, 12 to 14 minutes, or until lightly browned and tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven. Reserving the marinating liquid, drain the marinated vegetables. Top the roasted gai lan with the reserved marinating liquid. Carefully stir to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate and set aside in a warm place. Remove and discard the foil from the sheet pan.

While the gai lan roasts, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the mushrooms cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned and slightly softened. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until browned. Add the ginger season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant. Turn off the heat season with salt and pepper to taste.

While the mushrooms cook, in a bowl, combine the mayonnaise and as much of the sriracha as you'd like, depending on how spicy you'd like the dish to be. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Place the baguettes on the same sheet pan, cut side up. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toast in the oven 4 to 6 minutes, or until the edges are lightly browned. Remove from the oven and carefully transfer to a cutting board.

Spread the sriracha mayonnaise onto the cut sides of the toasted baguettes. Top the baguette bottoms with the cooked mushrooms and marinated vegetables (you may have extra vegetables). Complete the sandwiches with the baguette tops. Cut in half on an angle. Divide the sandwiches and dressed gai lan between 2 dishes. Garnish the gai lan with the sesame seeds. Enjoy!


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Vegetarian banh mi with marinated sesame tofu

It’s been like running a marathon this Christmas and New Year – cooking, eating, cooking and eating again. Then, with the spike in heat and humidity in Sydney lately, it’s hard to get the enthusiasm to cook or eat anything. With the weather like this, you really appreciate the genius of Vietnamese food, which is all about freshness and, with its irresistible combination of spicy, sweet and sour flavours, seems to have a restorative effect when the hot and sticky weather hits.

The banh mi roll is a Vietnamese/French flavour fusion in a baguette. It’s basically a herb and salad roll made traditionally with pork pate and sliced meat but with this vegetarian version with marinated tofu slices, you don’t feel like your missing anything. In fact, the lightness of the tofu seems like a positive. Sydney seems to be slightly obsessed with banh mi at the moment – my local shopping strip seems to have about half a dozen bakeries hawking some version of Vietnamese pork roll. Don’t be put off by the meaty advertising – most shops offer some kind vegetarian version. Rolls on Oxford in Darlinghurst even has a rather deluxe vego version featuring vegan meat and pate but even my simpler local offerings, with the cheese, salad, fresh herbs and dressing, are pretty bloody delicious.

Since I discovered how easy it was to make a vegetarian version of these rolls at home, I’ve gone on a bit of a banh mi bender and have been making them quite a lot recently. They are great for feeding a crowd – just gather together all the fixings and let people assemble their own rolls to taste. There are a few essentials for making banh mi at home – you need some kind of vegetarian protein. I generally go for a marinated tofu but fried tempeh is also good. The Hoisin barbecued tofu steaks I posted last year work really well, as does the quick carrot and cucumber pickle which gives a not so authentic but a very complementary lift to your banh mi. The last few times I’ve made banh mi though, I’ve used Deborah Madison’s sesame marinade, which is a lovely light alternative to the heavier Hoisin marinade.

Once you’ve got your protein sorted, you’ve got to prepare your fixings. Good mayonnaise is essential. You can make your own but I generally use the Japanese Kewpie mayonnaise, which comes in a handy squeeze bottle (which is great if you’re assembling a banh mi buffet and feeding the masses). FInely sliced green onions, cucumber batons, shredded carrot (preferably lightly pickled in brine – see recipe below) and fresh herbs, coriander, Vietnamese mint, basil, or a combination of all three are all good. You can stop there but I generally add some iceberg lettuce for extra crunch and some deep fried shallots for extra texture … and if I’m in the mood, some Dijon mustard (just to up the French influence in lieu of the pate). The final addition is a drizzle of Maggi seasoning or soy sauce for a that final umami spike of flavour. And there you have it – the perfect summer time vegetarian barbecue.

Vegetarian Banh mi

Marinated sesame tofu

You can use this marinade as a sauce for noodles, or a marinade for vegetables or tofu.


Salmon cake in baguette, Vietnamese style (bánh mì chả cá hồi)

Vietnamese “bánh mì” is popular well beyond Vietnam. The variations available in Vietnam go way beyond the well known “jambon” version. Bánh mì chả cá (fish cake in baguette) is widely available in Saigon. This is my version of that wonderful combination.

I have used salmon in this recipe instead of the more traditional white fish, usually catfish. Two reasons: I love salmon, and salmon is a really healthy food choice. Even farmed salmon! OK, wild salmon may be better, but how realistic is that for most of us? Farmed salmon is a very healthy option given the choices most of us face. At least according to the reading I have done.

Chả cá, or fish cake, is made by mashing fish flesh together with seasonings. The result is then broiling or grilling. It is a common ingredient in noodle soups, as well as in bánh mì.

The other ingredients of this bánh mì chả cá are typical of the Saigon street food version: pickled carrot and daikon, cucumber, mayo, chilli, and coriander. Actually there were a couple of variations: crushed green peppercorns gave a mayo a lot more character and I substituted basil for the coriander. The variations worked, and distinguished this version from the common street food variety.

Bánh mì chả cá is not the only bánh mì sandwich on delectabilia. Also check out the Bánh Mì Heo Quay (roast pork baguette) and bánh mì chay (vegetarian baguette).

Interested in exploring this vector of Vietnamese cuisine further, then I highly recommend this book …


Bánh Mì with Lemongrass Tofu

  • shellfish-free
  • dairy-free
  • fish-free
  • alcohol-free
  • vegetarian
  • peanut-free
  • pork-free
  • pescatarian
  • tree-nut-free
  • balanced
  • red-meat-free
  • Calories 272
  • Fat 8.7 g (13.5%)
  • Saturated 1.3 g (6.7%)
  • Carbs 40.3 g (13.4%)
  • Fiber 2.5 g (9.9%)
  • Sugars 9.6 g
  • Protein 8.7 g (17.5%)
  • Sodium 498.7 mg (20.8%)

Ingredients

For the do chua (pickles):

For the tofu:

extra-firm tofu (half a standard package)

For the spread:

Additional fillings and garnishes:

medium cucumber, sliced lengthwise

Instructions

Make the do chua (pickles):

In a large bowl, combine sugar, salt, vinegar, and water. Add daikon and carrots and toss. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour. Drain completely before using.

Make the tofu:

Cut tofu into 1/4-inch-thick slices and press between clean kitchen towels or paper towels to rid of excess water. In a shallow dish, combine soy sauce, vegetable oil, sesame oil, lemongrass, and garlic. Place tofu in dish, gently coat slices with marinade, and arrange so they overlap as little as possible. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour. Cook in a skillet over medium heat until brown and crisp on each side.

Make the spread:

In a small bowl, combine mayonnaise and cilantro. Add Maggi or soy sauce to taste, if desired.

To serve:

Slice baguettes lengthwise, leaving one side as a hinge. Spread mayonnaise on top and bottom halves. Arrange fillings and garnishes: cucumber, do chua, tofu, jalapeño, cilantro.

Recipe Notes

For the pickling liquid, the measurements given are guidelines feel free to adjust the sugar, vinegar, or salt to your own taste.

This recipe has been updated - originally published October 2009.

Emily Han is a Los Angeles-based recipe developer, educator, herbalist, and author of Wild Drinks & Cocktails: Handcrafted Squashes, Shrubs, Switchels, Tonics, and Infusions to Mix at Home. For recipes and classes, check out her personal site.


Banh Mi Bowls

  • Author: Lauren
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes (pickling time)
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings (3 cups pickled vegetables, 3 cups jackfruit mixture and ½ cup sauce) 1 x
  • Category: Lunch / Dinner
  • Method: Bowl
  • Cuisine: Vietnamese

Description

Satisfying Vegetarian Banh Mi Bowls with delicious saucy jackfruit, pickled vegetables and a creamy 3-ingredient sauce. Finished with fresh basil and cilantro, these bowls are a healthy way to enjoy the beloved Vietnamese sandwich.

Ingredients

Quick Pickled Vegetables

  • ¾ cup white or rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup thinly sliced carrots
  • 1 cup thinly sliced Daikon (or regular radishes)
  • 1 cup thinly sliced English cucumber
  • 1 tablespoon *fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • Black pepper
  • 18 ounces prepared jackfruit (two 9-ounce packages)
  • 3 cups cooked jasmine or brown rice
  • Fresh basil and cilantro for serving

Instructions

Quick Pickled Vegetables

Whisk together vinegar, honey and salt in a medium bowl. Add carrots, Daikon and cucumber and toss to combine let sit at least 15 minutes, tossing occasionally.

Spicy Mayo Sauce

Combine yogurt, mayonnaise and chili garlic sauce set aside.

Banh Mi Jackfruit

Combine fish sauce, lime juice, soy sauce, honey, oil, garlic, ginger and a few cracks of black pepper in a bowl. Add jackfruit and toss to coat.

Optional : heat jackfruit in the microwave for 1–2 minutes on high until heated through.

To serve, divide rice and jackfruit between serving bowls. Top with a few scoops of pickled vegetables and drizzle with spicy mayo sauce. Finish with a handful of basil and cilantro.

Notes

*to keep this vegetarian, use liquid aminos. Some vegetarians are willing to use fish sauce which is why I kept it in.

Make it vegan:

  • Use liquid aminos in place of the fish sauce
  • Use vegan mayonnaise instead of the regular mayonnaise and yogurt
  • Use agave syrup instead of honey

Use a different protein:

You can easily swap in cooked chicken (rotisserie for a super quick meal), shredded pork, ground pork, pork meatballs, turkey, tofu, etc.

Gluten-free note:

  • Just an FYI, not all soy sauces are gluten-free, if you need this to be gluten-free, be sure to seek out GF soy sauce.

Keywords: Banh Mi Bowl, Jackfruit bowl

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