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Walmart’s Award-Winning Wine Is Now Being Sold in America


This $7 bottle of Asda wine was named one of the best in the world and now it’s coming to America

No need to go to a specialty wine store or to get a mail-order package from Napa Valley. Just head to your local superstore.

This past summer, Asda, Walmart’s British subsidiary, shocked the world when its $7 wine won the “platinum best in show” award at the 2016 Decanter Magazine World Wine Awards with a score of 95 out of 100 points.Now, that wine — La Moneda Reserva Malbec — will be sold at 500 American Walmart locations starting next month.

Earlier this year, the Chilean malbec beat out more than 16,000 applicants in a blind taste test, and also won the “2015 Best Red Single Varietal Under £15” award, proving that you don’t need to be a price snob to drink a great glass of wine. After its accolades were announced, the wine sold out almost immediately at Asda stores.

Walmart described the wine as “a deep purple color with violet tints, rounded and velvety tannins, complex plum and fig spice flavors with an excellent lengthy finish,” and said it pairs well with barbecued meats.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.


Walmart Gets Back to Basics

Jinjoo Lee

Between competition from Amazon , big-box retailer peers and traditional grocery stores, Walmart has a lot to worry about. Last quarter’s results should help ward off at least one fear.

The retailer on Tuesday reported better-than-expected results for the quarter ended April 30, with comparable U.S. sales up 6% compared with the 1.5% growth analysts polled by FactSet had expected, boosted in part by stimulus payments. That growth is especially impressive given that it is being measured against the peak pandemic stockpiling period a year earlier, when comparable sales grew 10.3%. Excluding the effects of some nonrecurring items, earnings per share increased 43% from a year earlier.

The comparison with last year’s frenzy was even favorable in some ways. Walmart’s bottom line was flattered by a higher mix of general merchandise items compared with low-margin consumables such as toilet paper and canned goods, which flew off the shelves last year. Apparel, home goods and lawn and garden items all sold well last quarter, Walmart’s Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs said on an earnings call Tuesday morning. The bottom line was also helped by a decline in Covid-related costs.