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What’s Your Favorite Halloween Candy? Take Our Survey!


75 candies are in our survey; go and vote for your favorite

Do you prefer chocolates or gummies?

What’s your favorite Halloween candy? We want to know! Click on the link below and take our survey, choosing your favorites from 75 options.

The Daily Meal’s Favorite Halloween Candy Survey (Link)

Are you a Hershey’s Kiss fan? Does no Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup ever escape your clutches? Or are you more into Skittles and gummies? Are you a more “all of the above,” equal opportunity candy eater? Take our survey above, and vote for all of your favorites!

With Halloween right around the corner, every kid’s attention turns to two things: finding the perfect costume, and consuming as much candy as humanly possible. Coming home with a pillowcase filled with candy of every stripe on Halloween night is one of the great joys of childhood, but there’s no reason why grown-ups can’t take advantage of their kids’ exploits as well. So when you permit yourself to dig into the candy bag and snag a few pieces for yourself, what do you choose? Take our survey here, and check back next week to find out which ones were the winners!


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


The 6 Best and 5 Worst Candies for Your Health

Two registered dietitians share their picks for the healthiest and least healthy candy, so you can indulge smarter when a sugar craving strikes.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find that your cravings for sweet foods are going haywire, and scientifically speaking, it makes sense. Sweet foods activate the reward centers of the brain and lessen the body's stress response, according to an article published in April 2016 in Stress.

When special occasions (such as Valentine's Day, Easter, or Halloween) roll around, these temptations become nearly ubiquitous. Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey, admits that given this reality, indulging can be difficult to resist. "That’s why it’s best to have an action plan in place to enjoy the candy in moderation,” Gorin adds.

Plus, there’s the fact that reaching for candy to satiate a sweet tooth may be in your genes anyway, according to a study published in May 2017 in the journal Cell Metabolism. Another review, published in January 2016 in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggested that planning for these indulgences may help you stick to healthy eating habits. So go ahead and embrace the sweet season — just do it in a smart way.

First, put candy out of sight, like in the back of your pantry, or in the freezer, says Gorin. When it’s not staring you in the face, “you’re not constantly tempted by it,” she says. Eating it as a planned part of dessert rather than when you’re running around or doing other things — like working, or driving in the car — will help you truly enjoy it. Of course, you can and should enjoy festive candy, but there comes a point where it loses its luster and you may be eating it out of habit, so get rid of it after a week, Gorin advises.

Above all else, choose what you like best. (Yes, even regardless of the best and worst choices below!) If you truly enjoy what you’re eating, you’ll be satisfied by it. That means don’t let “fat-free” labels or calorie counts sway you from what you truly know you want. Mia Syn, RDN, who’s in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina, puts it simply: The best candy choice is the one you can eat and enjoy in moderation.

Now onto the sweet stuff. Here are the healthiest (and least healthy) candies, per Gorin and Syn:


Watch the video: Its Halloween! Whats your favorite costume? Superzoo (November 2021).