Other

10 Champagnes That Won’t Break the Bank


Celebrate the best way, even if you’re on a budget

10 Champagnes That Won’t Break the Bank

I’m a firm believer that wine drinkers don’t consume Champagne or sparklers from other regions often enough. That said, this is the time of year that people bust open some bubbly, typically on Christmas or New Year’s Eve.

Perhaps if everyone knew that nice, well-made, distinctive, and delicious Champagne can be bought without the possibility of endangering your mortgage or rent payment, they would drink it more often.

If you’ve got a reason to celebrate, why let the price of a bottle keep you from doing so? Everyone should be able to enjoy the bubbly whenever he or she wants to. Luckily, there are plenty of reasonably priced bottles available that allow you to do so.

Here are 10 Champagnes that you could celebrate with, serve at your holiday parties, or drink with a meal that won’t destroy your budget. Read on for budget-friendly bubbly, and get ready to pop those corks.

Laurent Perrier Brut NV ($34)

The percentage of chardonnay is higher than average (50 percent) in this selection, which lends to an inherent sense of lightness. It shows a beautiful pale straw color in the glass.

Laurent Perrier Brut NV ($34)

A touch of apricot underscores the nose, which leads with lemon ice. The palate is light and mellifluous with delicate layers of peach and hints of yellow apple. The long finish is soft and lush. If you want to sip your Champagne alone, this is a perfect choice.

Nicolas Feuillatte Brut NV ($35)

This is aged in the company’s cellars for over two years prior to release. I’ve been drinking this offering for over a decade and it never fails to impress.

Nicolas Feuillatte Brut NV ($35)

White fruit and yellow melon aromas lead the nose. Fresh fruit flavors, crème fraîche, and bits of vanilla fill the palate. It all continues through the finish along with bits of pear and spice.

Duc de Romet Brut Prestige Champagne NV ($36)

This selection is 75 percent pinot meunier, with the balance made up of pinot noir. There’s a nice heft to this wine which makes it great with an extremely wide array of foods.

Duc de Romet Brut Prestige Champagne NV ($36)

Raspberry aromas and bits of citrus light up the impressive nose here. The firm palate shows berry fruit flavors, bits of brioche and spice notes, too.

Duc de Romet Brut Prestige Champagne NV ($36)

The finish is long and persistent. If you need to convince someone to drink Champagne with dinner, start here.

Pol Roger Extra Cuvée Reserve Brut NV ($41)

This wine is a blend of equal parts chardonnay, pinot noir, and pinot meunier. A potpourri of aromas leap from the nose of this non-vintage brut; candied ginger, clover honey, almond, hazelnut, citrus, and a hint of yeast are the most prominent.

Pol Roger Extra Cuvée Reserve Brut NV ($41)

The full-flavored palate is loaded with character and flavors such as lemongrass, hints of peach, and a nice wallop of spices.

Pol Roger Extra Cuvée Reserve Brut NV ($41)

The crisp finish is layered and gentle with light yeast notes and continued spice that linger persistently. This is a classic brut.

Perrier Jouet Grand Brut ($43)

This Champagne was composed from a blend of pinot noir (40 percent), pinot meunier (40 percent), and chardonnay (20 percent). After fermentation and racking, more than 300 wines are tasted to assemble this blend.

Perrier Jouet Grand Brut ($43)

Aromas of apple, ginger, and lemon are all part of the gently expressive nose. Orchard fruit flavors are dominant on the palate along with a core of accompanying spices. Bits of brioche and biscuit are present on the lengthy finish along with lemon zest and white pepper spice. This is a terrific example of brut that shines year after year.

Mumm Cordon Rouge Brut ($45)

GH Mumm is one of the standard bearers of Champagne. There’s a reason for that: They make some banging bubbly. This entry level offering is a fantastic value.

Mumm Cordon Rouge Brut ($45)

A host of stone and tropical fruit aromas inform the welcoming and lovely nose. Those characteristics carry through the palate which is loaded with fresh fruit flavors and bits of spice.

Mumm Cordon Rouge Brut ($45)

The finish is light and crisp with zippy acid. It would be a great choice with light appetizers.

Piper-Heidsieck Brut Cuvée ($45)

This NV Champagne is composed of pinot noir (60 percent), pinot meunier (25 percent), and chardonnay (15 percent). I love the bits of linseed oil and citrus on the nose almost as much as the nuttiness and wisps of flaky biscuit on the palate.

Piper-Heidsieck Brut Cuvée ($45)

Veuve Clicquot Brut NV ($47)

Veuve Clicquot Brut NV ($47)

There’s something to be said for being able to find a good product easily. Such is the case here. It’s made up of 50 percent or more pinot noir, insuring a certain structure and firmness. Anjou pear and white peach aromas fill the nose.

Veuve Clicquot Brut NV ($47)

Bits of flaky biscuit join a host of fruit notes on the substantial palate. White pepper, savory scone, and more are part of the long finish. This is a great multipurpose Champagne you can welcome people with, celebrate with, or drink all meal long.

De Venoge Brut Rosé ($48)

De Venoge has been producing this cuvée since 1864. Red cherry and a bit of biscuit light up the nose. Toasted hazelnut, red berry fruits, and hints of tropical fruits are evident on the bright and somewhat juicy palate. Those characteristics are all in play through the above average finish which has nice heft.

De Venoge Brut Rosé ($48)

This is a very approachable selection that will appeal to those who don’t drink Champagne regularly, but with enough depth for those who do. Mark this selection “hard to put down.”

Moet & Chandon Rosé Imperial ($50)

Roughly half is composed of pinot noir, some of which is red wine. 30 to 40 percent is pinot meunier. The balance is chardonnay.

Moet & Chandon Rosé Imperial ($50)

This rosé has a particularly gorgeous pink hue that really appeals the moment you pour it. A bouquet of fresh, red berry fruits lights up the stunning nose. The palate is similarly loaded with a mélange of red berry flavors of varying stripes.

Moet & Chandon Rosé Imperial ($50)

Bits of black pepper and vanilla lead the finish, which is long and refreshing. This is another offering that will pair beautifully with a wide array of foods.


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


15 of the Best Champagnes Under $100

For years, sommeliers have championed the notion that Champagne is not just for celebrations, hailing the virtues of high-low pairings like blanc de blancs and fried chicken or rosé Champagne and pizza. Surely, few among us would turn down the opportunity to drink more French fizz, but compared with most styles of sparkling wine, the barrier for entry remains unavoidably high. Is there a happy medium for those of us who love the stuff but can rarely afford it?

While Champagne’s association with celebrations stretches back centuries, the hiked-up price of bubbles is built on more than reputation. Everything from the region’s tricky climate to the hands-on nature of Champagne production ultimately adds to its bottom line. Still, that doesn’t mean we need to limit our intakes to one or two special occasions per year.

With the rise of more affordable (if harder to find) grower-producer bottles, and the consistent quality offered by many larger houses, there are relative bargains to be found in Champagne. While not everyday sippers, this list contains 15 bottles of bubbly that won’t break the bank and don’t compromise on quality.

From delicate blancs de blancs to standout vintage wines, here are 15 of the best Champagnes under $100, tasted and ranked.

15. Pol Roger Réserve Brut

Pol Roger Réserve Brut dances between ripe and fresh fruit, with a garnish of nutty brown butter. Its medium body and well-rounded profile are kept in check by zippy acidity, while the finish is a dead ringer for warm cinnamon and raisin rolls. It’s an indulgent wine — but isn’t that the very reason for Champagne’s being? Average price: $45.

14. Champagne Geoffroy 2013 Empreinte

This vintage bottle from a grower-producer has all the hallmarks of non-vintage blends from large-scale houses, in the best possible ways. The nose is “classically” Champagne, with delicate fruit notes and a seasoning of fresh pastries. The palate is well balanced and velvety, with electric acidity. The finish lands without a hint of bitterness. Average price: $62.

13. Ruinart Brut Rosé

Red grapes (Pinot Noir) account for 55 percent of the blend of this rosé Champagne, and the strawberry and cherry notes of the variety shine, complemented by just the right amount of vanilla pod. The Chardonnay that makes up the rest of the blend kicks in with steely, mouthwatering acidity. Average price: $89.

12. Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut

Known for its cherry-red label and ties to the red carpet (Piper-Heidsieck being the official Champagne of the Oscars), Piper-Heidsieck presents a textbook example of non-vintage Champagne. Fruit arrives in the form of green apples by the bushel, and there’s no shortage of buttered, toasted bread notes. This is a timeless classic that’s priced for the people. Average price: $44.

11. Pierre Gimonnet & Fils “Cuvée Gastronome” Brut 2015

Despite its youth and singular varietal, this 100 percent Chardonnay Champagne delivers remarkably concentrated character. More impressive than its energetic fruit core is the intense mix of acidity and minerality, which adds intrigue to each sip and makes this the perfect aperitif. Average price: $67.

10. Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV

Taittinger Brut Reserve shares a similar profile to Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut (No. 12 on this list), but dials up the nuances of flavor and aroma. Building on a foundation of orchard fruit, its aromas recall citrus oil and Parmesan rind, while the palate is racy, fresh, and lures you back in for sip after sip. Open a bottle to kick off a meal or serve with a green salad with heaps of Parmesan shavings. Average price: $51.

9. Charles Heidsieck Blanc de Blancs

Blanc de blancs is usually a signifier for light, delicate Champagne — but not this one. The intensity with which this Champagne’s aromas and flavors land is a stark but welcome surprise. Peach, cooking apple, and lemon peel notes make fruit the star of the show. There’s a hint of proving bread dough, too, and a lengthy, mineral-rich finish. Average price: $94.

8. Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2008

This vintage Champagne is now really beginning to hit its stride. The pear and cherry notes from the equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blend shine bright, while lively acidity and delicate minerality add to the occasion. At this price, and having tasted this Champagne several times over the past 18 months, we’d be tempted to buy two — one to drink now and one to age for a few more years. Average price: $65.

7. Champagne Henriot 2008

With irresistible white peach and biscuit aromas, this is an enticing Champagne from the get-go. The palate delivers with rich, creamy character and an impressive array of fresh and dried fruit flavors. Burly, but not without nuance, this vintage Champagne is singing right now. Average price: $89.

6. Louis Roederer Blanc de Blancs 2013

Vintage, blanc de blancs Champagne always commands a premium, but this bottle justifies its price with delightful evolution, both from nose to finish and with time in the glass. Crisp orchard fruits begin the celebration, before the palate takes a heady turn, serving generous helpings of pastries and sweet oak. This is an elegant, polished Champagne that promises to only improve with more time. Average price $87.

5. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs NV

Delamotte’s blanc de blancs Champagnes continually impress us in both vintage and non-vintage forms, and this is a fine example of the latter. Sweet but fresh apple aromas kick things off and set the tone for the palate, a beautiful example of acidity “driving” a wine without becoming disjointed from the flavor or textural components. Enjoy this with fresh fish from the raw bar. Average price: $56.

4. Gaston Chiquet Premier Cru 2009

This blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay has the opulent feel of much more expensive bottles, and tastes two or three times its price. Dollops of honey coat crisp fruit on the nose, while the velvety palate serves buttered croissants and a sprinkling of sea salt. Meanwhile, bright acidity keeps everything alive and lightens the body of this Champagne, which performs well above its price tag. Average price: $66.

3. Pierre Peters Blanc de Blancs Cuvée Reserve

More than any bottle on this list, this grower Champagne will appeal to those seeking a rich but balanced mix of toasted brioche and luxurious vanilla notes. Don’t think that it lacks tart fruit, though. Each sip is a bite of perfectly ripe green apple and finishes with a spray of Meyer lemon oil. Though lavish and full of flavor, this Champagne allows what is clearly high-quality fruit to shine. Average price: $63.

2. Louis Roederer Brut Premier

While a single producer rarely appears twice in our rankings, two bottles from Louis Roederer are on this list because it was impossible to ignore the brand’s quality across the board. The Brut Premier provides everything we look for in a “classic” style of Champagne: piercing fresh fruit, yeasty bread notes, and a lean, zesty finish. This isn’t just a bottle to buy for Champagne occasions. Louis Roederer Brut Premier is a must-buy for whenever you see it. Average price: $51.

1. Bruno Paillard Première Cuvée

Bruno Paillard’s Première Cuvée is an extra-brut bottling, meaning less than 6 grams of sugar per liter is added as dosage. But this bottle extends beyond dry, sparkling white with laser-beam acidity. The cuvée includes grapes from more than 30 of Champagne’s 320 crus. There are layers of citrus fruit flavors and hints of nuts and brioche that add concentration. Each sip is flavorful but also incredibly refreshing. Pair this with practically anything, but especially crispy fried foods. Average price: $54


Watch the video: Δεν θα σε ξεχάσω ποτέ 2005-2019 (December 2021).