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Roasted Fingerling Potato Salad


Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for brushing
  • 1 1/2tpounds 1-inch-diameter fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup fresh Italian parsley leaves
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon leaves
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Banyuls vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon coarse-grained Dijon mustard
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled, chopped

Recipe Preparation

  • Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 400°F. Brush heavy large rimmed baking sheet with oil. Place potatoes and 2 tablespoons oil in large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, on prepared baking sheet. Roast until potatoes are brown on cut side, about 23 minutes. Using tongs, turn potatoes over. Roast until crisp, deep golden, and tender, about 12 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  • Stir green onions, parsley, tarragon, vinegar, mustard, and 2 teaspoons oil in small bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Transfer potatoes to dish. Spoon chopped eggs and herb salad over.

Recipe by Jeanne Thiel Kelley,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 206.1 %Calories from Fat 33.7 Fat (g) 7.7 Saturated Fat (g) 1.3 Cholesterol (mg) 61.9 Carbohydrates (g) 29.9 Dietary Fiber (g) 3.1 Total Sugars (g) 0.3 Net Carbs (g) 26.8 Protein (g) 4.8Reviews Section

Roasted Fingerling Potato Salad with Mustard Herb Vinaigrette

Quick, what comes to mind when I say potato salad? A mushy mayo laden clump of potatoes that has been hanging out in a deli case all day somewhere?

This roasted fingerling potato salad is a far cry from that its light and filled with lots of crunch and plenty of fresh flavors. So set aside any previous reservations you may have had about the iconic warm weather salad and let’s talk about this mayo-less version for a minute. If you’re looking for an alternative to the traditional potato salad, this may be the one for you.

I admit, I’ve never been a big fan of mayo. Homemade is fine, add a little garlic to it, even better, but from a jar? I’ll pass. I’d rather coat my potatoes with a slick of pesto or dress them up with a kicky vinaigrette.

Crunch and freshness is the key to this particular potato salad. It has a mustard vinaigrette punched up with a fistful of fresh herbs like dill, chives and parsley. There’s lemon juice and zest for brightness and celery and radishes for crunch.

The potatoes themselves are slicked in olive oil then roasted in a hot oven until their insides become soft and tender. They come out of the oven crispy on the outside and quite delicious on in their own right, but perfume them with, Dijon mustard, lemon zest and all those herbs, and they can only improve.


Roasted Fingerling Potato Salad

A unique take on potato salad with roasted fingerling potatoes, roasted garlic, kale, whole grain mustard.

Potato salad is one of those side dishes I absolutely LOVE but only eat under very specific conditions. I admit, I&rsquom a bit of a control freak when it comes to potato salad inputs &mdash it just has to be homemade&helliptypically by my hand&hellipbecause: preferences.

The &ldquodressing&rdquo either needs to be mayo-free or include a higher quality mayonnaise or homemade aioli (I do like a store-bought avocado oil mayo), or some sort of mayo situation that doesn&rsquot gross me out. What can I say? I startle easily when it comes to mayonnaise.

In addition, I love a potato salad with a nice tangy kick to it &ndash either lemon juice, stone ground mustard, cider vinegar, or horseradish are choice additions for me. You&rsquove seen an example of this in my German-Style Potato Salad with Caramelized Onions and Chives.

Lastly, bacon is encouraged, but not mandatory.

This potato salad is a bit different than your classic po&rsquo salad. First off, it involves roasted fingerling potatoes as opposed to boiled yukon gold potatoes. Secondly, roasted garlic and KALE is involved. Lastly, the dressing is lightened up a bit from your usual potato salad, making it less fatty. It also has that nice tang I was telling you about earlier.

All things considered, this roasted fingerling potato salad is easy to prepare, perfect for sharing with guests, easy to adapt to your personal taste, and has a beautiful texture and flavor. It&rsquos what I would consider to be easy eating.


Egyptian potato salad gets a modern twist from black lentils, buttery fingerlings and garlicky labneh

When Shahir Massoud was growing up in Toronto, summer gatherings inevitably included potato salads, made by his mother and the other women in the family and community. The traditional Egyptian dishes included the classic lentils and a lemony dressing.

As a child, he loved the combination. But now, as a 37-year-old trained restaurant chef, he looks back and thinks: Couldn’t it have been better? The potatoes were nondescript, and the green lentils were “cooked to oblivion.” The latter was the biggest problem, as he remembers, because it made for a lack of textural variation, which is so important to the way he cooks now.

In his first cookbook, “Eat, Habibi, Eat!,” Massoud revisits the foods of his childhood, especially the celebration dishes made by his mother, who owned a pharmacy and would undoubtedly refer to him as “habibi,” or “my darling” in Arabic.

“I thought, ‘Why don’t I take all these influences and my restaurant training and put some spins on those dishes, but still honor the traditions?’” he said in a phone interview from Toronto, where he lives with his wife and two young children. “They still had to taste like the version they were inspired by, but they could be more interesting.”

When it comes to that potato salad, for instance, Massoud switches to black lentils and buttery fingerlings, cooking them carefully to keep their textures intact. He dresses the potatoes while they’re warm so the dressing soaks in, adding flavor to every bite, and he adds dollops of another traditional Egyptian ingredient: labneh — salted and strained yogurt. (But not just any labneh. For his, he first makes a garlic confit, whisking some of the sweet cloves into the yogurt after it has thickened.)


Mediterranean Roasted Potato Salad


I wanted to use up some fingerling potatoes and grape tomatoes I had on hand so I decided to make a Mediterranean potato salad. I roasted the fingerling potatoes then tossed them in a lemon vinaigrette and let them cool. I then tossed the cooled potatoes with grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, red onion, and feta cheese along with the remaining vinaigrette. It was a quick and simple recipe that tasted amazing. This salad was a huge hit with my entire family, especially my son. I highly recommend this recipe!

  • 1-2 tsp olive oil
  • 2 cups of fingerling potatoes, cut in half
  • Handful of grape tomatoes
  • 3 tbsp red onion, sliced
  • 15 kalamata olives, sliced in half
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2-3 tbsp feta cheese
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1/4 tsp dried oregano
  • Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with tin foil and coat with cooking spray.

Cut the fingerling potatoes in half and place on the baking sheet. Drizzle 1-2 tsp olive oil on the potatoes and season with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste. Toss to coat evenly then place in the oven and roast for 15-20 minutes, or until tender.

While the potatoes are roasting make the vinaigrette. In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, minced garlic, oregano, sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste. Whisk until well blended then set aside.

Remove the potatoes from the oven, toss with half of the vinaigrette and set aside until they cool. Once the potatoes are cooled, add the grape tomatoes, red onion, kalamata olives, parsley, and feta cheese. Drizzle the remaining vinaigrette on top and toss to coat evenly. Serve immediately. Enjoy.

Giveaway Winners:

I had my daughter and son pick a number between 1-75 to choose the winners. My daughter chose #40 and my son chose #7.

Please e-mail me with your mailing address and I will send you both two coupons each good for 1 package of Johnsonville Italian Sausage. Congratulations ladies!


Egyptian potato salad gets a modern twist from black lentils, buttery fingerlings and garlicky labneh

When Shahir Massoud was growing up in Toronto, summer gatherings inevitably included potato salads, made by his mother and the other women in the family and community. The traditional Egyptian dishes included the classic lentils and a lemony dressing.

As a child, he loved the combination. But now, as a 37-year-old trained restaurant chef, he looks back and thinks: Couldn’t it have been better? The potatoes were nondescript, and the green lentils were “cooked to oblivion.” The latter was the biggest problem, as he remembers, because it made for a lack of textural variation, which is so important to the way he cooks now.

In his first cookbook, “Eat, Habibi, Eat!,” Massoud revisits the foods of his childhood, especially the celebration dishes made by his mother, who owned a pharmacy and would undoubtedly refer to him as “habibi,” or “my darling” in Arabic.

“I thought, ‘Why don’t I take all these influences and my restaurant training and put some spins on those dishes, but still honor the traditions?’” he said in a phone interview from Toronto, where he lives with his wife and two young children. “They still had to taste like the version they were inspired by, but they could be more interesting.”

When it comes to that potato salad, for instance, Massoud switches to black lentils and buttery fingerlings, cooking them carefully to keep their textures intact. He dresses the potatoes while they’re warm so the dressing soaks in, adding flavor to every bite, and he adds dollops of another traditional Egyptian ingredient: labneh — salted and strained yogurt. (But not just any labneh. For his, he first makes a garlic confit, whisking some of the sweet cloves into the yogurt after it has thickened.)


First, fill an 8-quart stock pot with eight cups of water. Add one tablespoon of salt for seasoning. Bring the water to a boil. While you are waiting for the water to boil, cut 2 1/2 pounds of red potatoes into quarters.

Once the water comes to a boil, carefully add the potatoes. Boil for 15-20 minutes until the potatoes are fork tender. This means you can easily pierce the potatoes with a fork and they will slide right off the tines. Drain the potatoes and allow them to cool completely.

Boiling the potatoes can be done up to two days in advance and you don’t have to worry about them turning that grayish color that raw potatoes can take on if you cut them up too early.


We’ve saved the best potato salad for last! There’s still “thyme” to squeeze in one more summer BBQ. You’ll be surprised and delighted with a burst of citrus flavor and a light touch of creaminess, all topped off with fresh thyme.

  • Salad
  • 1 1/2 lbs fingerling potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch circles
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 red onion, cut into 1-inch cubes (do not separate layers)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • Dressing
  • 1/4 cup light or olive oil based mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 425°F. Toss all salad ingredients together in a large bowl. Spread in a single layer on a large baking sheet and cook for 20 to 25 minutes or until potatoes start to brown. Let cool for at least 10 minutes. Meanwhile, whisk together all dressing ingredients in a medium bowl toss with cooled vegetables. Serve at room temperature or chilled. Makes 6 servings.

Irresistible Potato Creations

This wonderful new collection of Colorado potato recipes features over 175 recipes submitted by Colorado potato lovers from all over the country. Enjoy trying new potato breakfasts, appetizers, salads, soups, entrees, sides and even, dare we say it. desserts!


What You Need for Roasted Garlic and Herb Potatoes

  • Potatoes: Feel free to use any type of potato here, sweet potatoes included. Just keep in mind that the larger the variety, the more chopping you’ll have to do.

The Secret to Perfectly Crispy Roasted Potatoes?

  • Spread Them Out: Evenly spread the potatoes out into a single layer with a little bit of room between each one. You want to ensure air circulation and avoid steam that can build up when potatoes are stacked one atop the other.


Watch the video: Linseneintopf mit Wiener Würschtl (December 2021).