Other

How to Make Chai, Green Tea, and 5 Other Lattes at Home


Turn your kitchen into a coffee shop with these easy do-it-yourself latte recipes

Steamed milk, tea or coffee, and a little flavored syrup go a long way toward recreating your favorite coffee shop latte.

Try as you might, passing by a Starbucks without going in for a latte is a hard thing to do. The thing is, you could be spending that $5-plus on other things — and this is the age of DIY, so there is no reason you can’t get that coffee shop caffeine hit at home.

How to Make Chai, Green Tea, and 5 Other Lattes at Home (Slideshow)

One of the reasons coffee shop drinks are so good is that the coffee they use is of high quality. We’re not talking Folgers crystals here — you’ve got to choose a strong, espresso-style coffee, preferably made with Arabica beans. Whether you prefer brewing in a French press, stovetop macchinetta, or automatic coffee machine, using quality coffee will change the experience.

If you’re a fan of the Pumpkin Spice Latte, or PSL, you don’t have to wait until fall rolls again around to whip one up. There’s no actual pumpkin in it; instead, the flavor comes from pumpkin pie spice mix and a bit of spiced-up sugar syrup.

Tea drinkers can fill their latte love tank, too, with easy DIY recipes for chai tea lattes and green tea. Loose matcha and chai tea powder is easily found in supermarkets and online, so you can customize your recipe to be as strong or weak as you like. Brew and mix with steamed or frothed milk and you’ve got the perfect at home latte. Nespresso makes a portable milk frother called the Aeroccino that can steam and cold froth milk for hot and iced lattes and cappuccinos. Or, froth it up in the blender and add to cold brewed or chilled coffee.

Here are six of our favorite DIY latte recipes.

Chai Tea Latte

Chai tea is a rich and spiced tea that has been savored for centuries in many parts of the world, especially India and Africa. It is a common drink for kids in Tanzania and even more popular among tea-lovers that need a latte fix.

Click here to see the Chai Tea Latte Recipe.

Green Tea Latte

Green tea lattes aren’t made with green tea. Instead they are made with matcha, a fine green tea powder made from shade grown tealeaves.

Click here to see the Green Tea Latte Recipe.


Decadent Chai Latte from Scratch

Masala chai is a spiced tea drink common in India. Masala chai means mixed-spice tea. In the US, we shorten masala chai to just chai.

  • Chai is made by brewing black tea with Indian spices.
  • Chai translates to tea. (So it&rsquos incorrect to say &lsquochai tea&rsquo since that&rsquos saying &lsquotea tea.&rsquo)
  • There is no universal chai spice blend that everyone uses but you&rsquoll taste some overlapping flavors like cardamom, ginger, star anise, cloves, and cinnamon with each version.
  • To make chai from scratch, I created my own chai spice blend using a bunch of different spices.

Two Easy Ways to Chai

An easy gateway to the tea world for novices, you’ll find some iteration of chai at practically every coffee shop in the Western world, regardless of how bountiful (or pitiful) their tea selection happens to be otherwise. You’ll find that most shops make their chai with a liquid concentrate (or in some cases, a powdered drink mix), but the traditional preparation is the same as any tea beverage — you start with tea leaves!

With the upswing in popularity of tea brewing at home, it’s not hard to find loose leaf chai blends with the spices already perfectly proportioned and blended in. For our recipe below, this is the most foolproof way to brew. But if you’re feeling a bit more adventurous, you can play around with brewing your own — simply start with a good quality black tea and add spices to your taste as you go. The most common chai spices are warming ones like cardamom, cinnamon, allspice, anise seed, clove, and ginger.

For a great at-home chai latte, we recommend one of two methods: brewing the tea in hot water and adding your milk after (like a latte), or, for a creamier (but potentially less-foolproof) cuppa, brewing your spiced tea straight in milk on the stovetop. With these options, you’ll never find yourself wondering how to make a chai tea latte at home ever again!


Chai Tea Latte Benefits

Because this fragrant drink is a mixture of many different elements that have been proven to have health benefits, chai tea is also good for you.

Heart Health Benefits

The cinnamon in your chai tea latte benefits your heart by reducing levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Lowers Blood Sugar Levels

The ginger and cinnamon combo in a chai tea benefits your blood sugar levels, but only if you stay away from the super sweet versions because added sugar can quickly wipe out any blood sugar lowering benefits.

Helps with Nausea

The ginger in chai tea benefits those who suffer from nausea and is especially effective for pregnant women.

I love it when something that tastes great also does great things for my health!

MORE TO SIP ON: How to Make An Iced Matcha Green Tea Latte


The 5 Spices You Need for Homemade Chai (Well, OK. Maybe There Are 8.)

I conceived of this post as a starting point for all of you who love chai, that spicy and fragrant milky tea drunk across most of India and much of east Africa. I wanted to show you the five essential spices that, once procured, will help you make a delicious cup of spicy tea. But then I ran into difficulties. Chai comes in so many forms and flavors — I think I might start a minor tea war here if I prescribed only five spices.

So here then is a more free-flowing guide, with my own personal five favorites, other excellent choices, and the one absolutely essential spice for making chai that tastes like chai.

Yes, Chai Just Means Tea. We’re Talking About Masala Chai.

You probably know that the word chai by itself just means “tea,” and the spiced-up version of tea that has come be known by the word chai here in the U.S. is actually masala chai, implying tea with a mix of spices.

But I think in America “chai” overall isn’t associated with plain tea it’s the catch-all name for this spicy tea and even just the spices themselves that make chai taste like chai.

So, what are those spices? What gives most masala chai its signature flavors?

The Essential Spice: Green Cardamom

When we talk about “chai-flavored” anything, in my opinion the dominant flavor we’re really talking about is green cardamom. Intensely fragrant, with sharp vegetal notes of green spice and pepper, green cardamom pods are harvested earlier than black cardamom, which is muskier and more smoky.

Green cardamom is the base of most chai recipes that I am aware of. I like to buy green cardamom from the bulk bins at my local health food store, and I very lightly crack the pods before steeping them in the tea.

The Other Essentials (In My Humble Opionion)

After green cardamom the taste of chai can diverge in a few different directions. However, these four spices are perhaps most commonly used, and they form the base of the chai that I make the most:


Does anyone make CHAI TEA LATTES at home?

The base of the chai tea latte is a tea of your choice steeped in hot water with some spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves, ginger allspice, depending on the flavors enjoyed. Then you warm and froth some milk and mix into the tea base. You would also add a sweetener to taste to the hot tea and spices. There are quite a few recipes online.

A chai latte is 'hot foamed milk' sometimes with spices. I learned this the hard way when I ordered a chai latte at starbucks, expecting chai tea latte.

There are premade liquid mixes available in the tea section of grocery stores that I've enjoyed. There are also some kcups for keurig and other machines or just tea bags that say chai, but the pods I've found to have artificial sweeteners and I don't use any artificial sweetening products.

Now I want to go to Starbucks and have them make me one. Enjoy!

Mjkacmom

DIS Veteran
DIS Veteran

Scottmel

<font color=darkorchid>Does my logic in my origina

Scottmel

<font color=darkorchid>Does my logic in my origina

The base of the chai tea latte is a tea of your choice steeped in hot water with some spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves, ginger allspice, depending on the flavors enjoyed. Then you warm and froth some milk and mix into the tea base. You would also add a sweetener to taste to the hot tea and spices. There are quite a few recipes online.

A chai latte is 'hot foamed milk' sometimes with spices. I learned this the hard way when I ordered a chai latte at starbucks, expecting chai tea latte.

There are premade liquid mixes available in the tea section of grocery stores that I've enjoyed. There are also some kcups for keurig and other machines or just tea bags that say chai, but the pods I've found to have artificial sweeteners and I don't use any artificial sweetening products.

Now I want to go to Starbucks and have them make me one. Enjoy!

Judique

Dis Veteran, Beach Lover at BWV, BCV, HHI, VB

Chaboyd

Mouseketeer

Scottmel

<font color=darkorchid>Does my logic in my origina

Fofinia

DIS Veteran
DIS Veteran

Of Course! He said he found a copycat recipe online and modified it some until he got it where DD deemed it close enough not to want Starbucks every day.

He puts half a cup of water and a Tazo Chai Tea bag in a small saucepan on medium for 10 minutes. He said the original recipe he found called for 2 tea bags, but after trying it both ways they decided it did not need 2. He does not put the lid on the pot, but says you probably could because there are times he has forgotten he started it and left it a long time, and then has come back and he has let all the liquid boil out and the pan is dry.

After 10 minutes, he adds 1 cup of 1% milk.
He sprinkles cinnamon and nutmeg over the top.
He adds a tablespoon of honey and stirs it all in.
Sometimes he sprinkles the cinnamon and nutmeg after stirring the honey in, but says usually he just stirs it all.
He pours it in a coffee mug and puts in the freezer for about 10 or 15 minutes and then pours it over ice.

We are going to get that Tazo concentrate that was posted above and give it a try too. I am hopeful since he makes it with Tazo tea bags (which apparently the brand has to be Tazo to taste right) It sounds like it would be a lot easier on him if that worked. which means she will probably reject it. LOL.

Butterscotchcollins

Drop Chicken

A latte, as stated above, involves hot foamed milk, you can get a relatively inexpensive frother at Target. Then you pour that over steeped chai tea. The beauty of tea is there are so many companies and flavors to explore, if she likes tea or wants to try different kinds you can always get her like a Chai sampler gift set Tea lattes are super easy to make and this might also be a good opportunity to have her learn a new skill to prepare them herself.

Side note though this is really sweet! What a good dad

Supersnoop

What time is the three o'clock parade?

Crisi

DIS Veteran

Chaboyd

Mouseketeer

Scottmel

<font color=darkorchid>Does my logic in my origina

Of Course! He said he found a copycat recipe online and modified it some until he got it where DD deemed it close enough not to want Starbucks every day.

He puts half a cup of water and a Tazo Chai Tea bag in a small saucepan on medium for 10 minutes. He said the original recipe he found called for 2 tea bags, but after trying it both ways they decided it did not need 2. He does not put the lid on the pot, but says you probably could because there are times he has forgotten he started it and left it a long time, and then has come back and he has let all the liquid boil out and the pan is dry.

After 10 minutes, he adds 1 cup of 1% milk.
He sprinkles cinnamon and nutmeg over the top.
He adds a tablespoon of honey and stirs it all in.
Sometimes he sprinkles the cinnamon and nutmeg after stirring the honey in, but says usually he just stirs it all.
He pours it in a coffee mug and puts in the freezer for about 10 or 15 minutes and then pours it over ice.

We are going to get that Tazo concentrate that was posted above and give it a try too. I am hopeful since he makes it with Tazo tea bags (which apparently the brand has to be Tazo to taste right) It sounds like it would be a lot easier on him if that worked. which means she will probably reject it. LOL.


Starbucks Iced Chai Latte Recipe

Have you ever tried making a copycat Starbucks iced chai recipe? Did its flavor measure up to a barista-made drink?

To help you figure out how to make your at-home recipe be more like Starbucks, let me show you exactly how they make it at Starbucks.

And by exact, I mean the exact ingredients and exact proportions. My daughter is a barista at Starbucks, so this is the real deal.

Starbucks syrup and concentrate are measured by the number of pumps that’s squirted into each cup.

Although, the barista may also use the black lines on the cup for measuring, as well. If you’ve never noticed those lines, now you will.

Since we don’t have pumps and lines on our cups at home, I got an empty Starbucks cup and figured out the exact quantities needed.

Here’s how Starbucks makes a grande iced chai latte

There are only three ingredients in a Starbucks iced chai latte:

  1. Highly concentrated chai concentrate
  2. 2% milk
  3. Ice (made with triple filtered water)

Directions for a grande iced chai latte

  • Add 4 pumps of chai concentrate directly into the cup (⅓ cup)
  • Add milk up to the third black line cup marking (1 cup)
  • Fill the cup with ice and give it a swirl to mix

Now, take a careful look at the photo below.

Notice that the four pumps of concentrate comes up to the first clear line (bump) on the cup.

I did a little experiment to see how much liquid it takes to get to that line and it’s ⅓ cup.

Next, Starbucks baristas add milk up to the third black line on the cold cup. To get from the clear line to the third black line takes an additional 1 cup of liquid.

Finally, fill the remaining space with ice. A quick swirl of the cup mixes the ingredients together nicely.


Chai Favorites from Around the World

We’ve discussed some of the favorite United States ways to make and enjoy chai, with its sweetness, milk, and abundance of spices, but what about around the globe? I always find it a bit fascinating to see the variety of cultural differences in enjoying both food and drink. As we will soon see, we all have one thing in common: we love our chai tea.

Chai is a staple of India, and it’s where the drink we know and love was first brewed. Like a secret family recipe, you will find a variety of ways this tea tastes and is served. One of the biggest differences is that India uses cut, tear, curl (CTC) tea leaves rather than the whole leaves we find in many American chai teas. This creates an intense flavor profile which is complemented by a variety of spices along with water, milk, and sugar. Depending on what region you’re in within the country, some places will mix CTC leaves, milk, and water and bring to a simmer on the stove for the day, later adding in sugar and a special blend and concentration of their own spices such as cardamom, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and a variety of several others. Often served up in a handmade clay cup, it is said that these cups provide the crucial ingredient to get the true taste of this drink.

In other parts of Asia, chai is prepared similarly to masala chai from India, but in some regions, like Nepal, po cha is made instead. This tea uses yak butter, tea, and water. Instead of adding sugar for sweetness, salt is added.

In Hong Kong, they make a version of chai called “pantyhose tea.” Made with black tea as well as a blend of others, which will be unique to the tea artist, this tea is brewed with force by straining the tea through a cheesecloth bag for about 15 minutes in boiling water to produce a thick and dark tea. It is served up with condensed milk and as much sugar as you’d like.


Easy Chai Tea Mix

I've adapted this Easy Chai Tea Mix from Knitting Nurse.

Believe it or not, back in the day I used to have a knitting blog. I did a ton of knitting and had a ton of yarn (still do!), and I shared my projects on the internet. The blog is still up, so maybe you can find it . ha!

These days, I don't do much knitting anymore (I always mean to pick it up again), but I still love this recipe I found on a knitting blog I used to read. It really couldn't be simpler to make, and it's just so good.

If you've ever wondered how to make a chai tea latte at home&mdashwithout a lot of fuss&mdashthis is the recipe for you. I won't claim this recipe is the most authentic way to make chai, but it sure does taste delish!

How to Make Easy Chai Tea Mix

This simple mix is the first step to creating a homemade chai tea latte, and it's so simple to make!

The secret ingredient in this chai tea concentrate is sweetened condensed milk. It gives the tea a little body, adds sweetness, and is the perfect vehicle for all the flavorful spices.

All you need to do is mix the sweetened condensed milk with your spices: ginger, cloves, cinnamon, cardamon, and nutmeg. Feel free to adjust the amount of spices to your taste.

Now that you've made the homemade chai tea concentrate, it's time to make your latte.

You'll want to brew a strong cup of tea first. I usually use black or green tea. This time I used Earl Grey.

Feel free to experiment with other tea flavors though. I've used flavored teas to make homemade chai lattes in the past, and they were wonderful.

And recently, I had a rooibos chai latte at a coffee shop that was so amazing. Can't wait to recreate that one at home, too!

How to Use the Chai Tea Concentrate

Simply add a heaping tablespoon of this Easy Chai Tea Mix into your hot tea (adding more or less, to taste). Then, mix well and enjoy!

You could even stir in a little melted chocolate along with the Chai Syrup for a chocolate chai. One of my fave coffee shops used to make those, and I loved them.

It's also delicious in my Dirty Chai Latte recipe, which is perfect for those days when you need a little boost.


HOW DO YOU MAKE A CHAI TEA LATTE RECIPE?

Creating a chai tea latte at home is really easy and will only take you 10 minutes.

If you live in a dorm, are camping or maybe in an RV check out this Instant Pot Chai Tea Latte using a pressure cooker.

In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup water to a boil. Add the cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice and cloves to the water and stir.

Take the water off of the heat once boiling and place the tea bags in the water to steep for 5 minutes. Remove the tea bags from the water.

Pour the tea into your cup.

Add the milk, vanilla and syrup into the small saucepan and bring to a simmer. From here you can pour this into the cup with the tea or use a frother or an immersion blender to froth the milk.