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Monday Nights Are Not Date Nights, Experts Say


So if you schedule a date on Monday, you'll probably be stood up

Never schedule a date for a Monday.

For those of you wondering when to schedule your next romantic tryst, try not to schedule it on a Monday. Match.com's 2013-2014 LoveGeist report found that Monday dates were more likely to be postponed or canceled than any other day of the week, the Daily Mail reports.

The reasons are obvious: people are still hungover from the weekend, or just realized how much work they have to do, or simply just want to lay low for one evening. The survey found that gym visits and work commitments ended up playing a big role in cancelations, but "illness" was the most common reason (33 percent said they would cancel with this excuse).

Meanwhile, 19 percent said they would cancel for "being too tired," 12 percent for being too broke, and 6 percent for a better date option (like being asked out by someone else). Which is just to say, if you've scheduled a date for Monday and you cancel, you're probably not that invested in the first place.

So when should you try to schedule a date? Saturday night, if only because people have more time to relax and prepare. Of the participants, 81 percent said they were more likely to cancel a date on a weeknight than a weekend night, with relationship expert Kate Taylor of Match.com saying, "Saturday nights have an in-built feeling of fun which adds excitement to any date, and they come with the added bonus of extra hours of preparation time." The only problem would be getting a dinner reservation.


Sleeping Disorders and Insomnia May Up Risk of Preterm Delivery: Your Diet Can Help in Sleeping Better

Highlights

  • Are you unable to sleep at nights?
  • Experts link insomnia during pregnancy to risk of preterm delivery
  • What you eat may affect your sleep cycle

The American Sleep Association categorizes sleep in three stages - 1, 2 and REM. The importance of a good 7-8 hour sleep stems from the fact that a person takes considerable time to move from stage 1 of sleep to the final deep sleep that is the REM stage. People who sleep less may actually not be able to be in all the three stages for adequate time. This inadequacy may trigger a host of ailments and even cognitive decline.

The role of proper sleep in maintaining our health is gravely misunderstood, or not understood in its entirety. Sleep deprivation may lead to ailments that might not seem remotely linked to it. From weight gain, sluggish metabolism to triggering digestive issues and even depression - the woes of improper sleep are many. A recently published study has linked poor sleep during pregnancy with risk of preterm delivery. The study was an outcome of an investigation carried out on close to 3 million pregnant American women. The study mentioned that women diagnosed with insomnia or sleep apnea were more likely to deliver at least 6 weeks prior to the due date. The study was reported by Reuters. Preterm delivery often comes accompanied with health issues and complications in the newborn.

Undeniably, pregnancy is an extremely crucial phase in a woman's life. While a well-balanced diet is of the utmost importance to ensure optimum health and proper nourishment to the fetus, proper rest and sleep is also essential. If you have been experiencing difficulty in sleeping, try changing your bedding and shift to a different set of pillows. Make sure that your room is well ventilated and the temperature is just about right. Too much light may also keep some people from sleeping. Read a book before turning in and take a hot water shower to induce sleep. Keep all your gadgets away at least 20 minutes before sleeping. If making these changes doesn't work, consider monitoring diet for the following:

1. Make sure that the last meal of your day is light on stomach and easy to digest. Finish your dinner at least a couple of hours before turning in.

2. Steer clear of oil-laden and spicy foods as it may hamper your sleep.

3. Monitor your caffeine intake and do not have it before sleeping.

4. Excessive sugar intake is likely to give a sugar high that might prevent you from falling asleep.

5. Items like cherries, bananas, milk, rice, good carbs, and fermented food items are great for your sleep.

6. Items like wine, processed foods, meats, alcohol, caffeine, sugar-laden items, rich preparations like curries can meddle with your good night's sleep.

7. Ayurvedic herbs like ashwagandha are known to tackle sleep issues. Ashwagandha is easily available in the market in powdered form, as capsules and as tea bags.


How do you like them apples? Kent's apple crop late but brighter and sweeter than ever

They might be brighter and sweeter - but Kent's apples are three weeks late because of a delayed summer.

Today is the official start of the English apple season, with the nation's crop of 115,000 tonnes of the fruit a third higher than last year.

A cold start to the year coupled with largely dull weather until the end of June left many apple trees struggling to produce good-sized fruit.

But the upside is the county's apples are more colourful than usual – with red skins thanks to the warm late summer and colder September nights.

Experts say the sunshine has also helped with the taste, which is said to be sweeter, crunchier and juicier compared to previous yields.

Farmer Peter Checkley, from Broadwater Farm, near West Malling, said: "We had a difficult crop last year, but the crop this year has recovered.

"The cold spring led to late flowering. The good thing about it was that when the summer did come, it was warmer.

"The weather has been superb since the end of June. The temperatures have been above normal and we have had more sunshine hours.

"This means two really good things for this year's crop – colour and sugar.

"The fruit is not only more colourful than normal, a brighter and much deeper red for the dessert varieties, but also much sweeter."

Cox apples at Broadwater Farm, near West Malling Peter Checkley, from Broadwater Farm near West Malling

Demand to eat English apples has grown over recent years, with farmers adopting new technology to keep up supplies.

Mr Checkley added: "We have had to modify our systems over the years to ensure that we get good quality crops and yields.

"That has involved planting trees closer together, maximising the yield in a smaller space.

"We have also had to build stores and use better technology to store our fruit more effectively.

"This has extended the season we can supply English apples, but we are looking to push these horizons over the years even further."


Climate change and energy: no ‘green bullet’ for quick, low-cost solution

Every season, the Empire Club of Canada collects into a single, handy volume the speeches by all those worthies invited to the venerable Royal York Hotel to address its luncheon gatherings on urgent themes of the times.

It might hearten those concerned with the fate of civilization here on the little blue planet to know that in 2010-11 the Empire Club had its finger squarely on the pulse of the most vital of current issues, with five separate orations on energy-related themes — oil, nuclear, gas and both sides of the wind-turbine debate.

A poll this week suggests 98 per cent of Canadians (more of us than can probably be said to agree on anything) now believe climate change is real.

It would seem the Earth’s increasingly dramatic warnings — by way of meteorological mayhem, widespread drought and the ensuing threat to affordable food, and inevitably social stability — has made the case convincingly.

As Thomas L. Friedman noted in his book Hot, Flat and Crowded: “The green revolution is not about the whales anymore. And it is not about our ‘children’s children,’ a generation so distant it is really hard to get energized about. This is about us.”

It is especially about the “us” who reside in cities, so-called “heat islands,” where the paved urban paradise of asphalt, steel and concrete absorbs and retains greater amounts of solar energy and emits it all through the sweltering nights. Experts say big cities are literally “hot spots,” with average temperatures significantly higher than the hinterland.

The World Bank says cities are carbon spews, responsible for 80 per cent of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere.

Moreover, cities are relentlessly attracting population — and the congestion and pollution that go with it — as urbanization proceeds apace.

Toronto can claim less blame, on a per-capita basis anyway, than the rest of Canada.

According to the UN, Canadians load the atmosphere with an average 22.65 tonnes of greenhouse gases per year. GTA citizens, partly because of the aforementioned sizzling “urban heat effect,” which keeps us more comfortable in the ever-warming winters, contribute 11.6 tonnes.

But that’s bound to increase as we rely more and more on our air conditioners to ratchet down the temperature.

Memo to the mayor: more than a third of our contribution, says the World Bank, comes from cars.

And, in 2008, a Canadian Medical Association study found that air pollution cost Ontario almost $4 billion annually in lost productivity and health care.

To date in Toronto, a good deal has been done locally, more is planned, but drastic measures have not yet been equal to increasingly desperate times, times that this summer as much as scream “More! Faster!”

This may be, as founding president of Encana Corp. Gwyn Morgan told the Empire Club, because there is no such thing — however much political leaders and their citizenries might wish otherwise — as “a green bullet” to provide a quick, easy, low-cost solution.

Encana, it goes without saying, bills itself as a “leading producer” of natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids.

And so, we are told, we must accept and adapt to climate chaos.

By many accounts, a hindrance in recent years has been a federal government that supports oil while slashing science a provincial government that, while well-meaning and plainly seized by the challenges and opportunities, has played politics with power and won only middling grades from the auditor-general and environmental commissioner who monitor its real progress and a mayor who, in his own address to the Empire Club just before his election, said not a word about energy matters except that he objected to “the war” on the offending car.

At bottom, the arithmetic is relatively simple: use less energy, mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and produce more energy of a renewable kind.

There is also a burning need for energy security, something that will become painfully, perhaps tragically, obvious in the event of the extreme weather experts say lies ahead.

Heat waves make it hard for electrical systems to cool off at night, to gear up for another day of marathon air-conditioning. Torrents and ice storms knock out power lines. Floods wash them away.

A blackout would strand people in those towering condo buildings, without heat, light, A/C and even water. There aren’t enough generators in town to stop the sweltering. Business would lose billions. Insurance claims for thawed-out freezers or frozen pipes would skyrocket.

Toronto Hydro should build a “smart grid,” insists Franz Hartmann, executive director of the Toronto Environmental Alliance. “That’s an electrical system that allows power to be put in from pretty well anywhere with meters that can go backwards and forwards.

“They can go forwards when you’re drawing electricity from outside. And they go backwards when. . . your solar system is putting electricity into the system. That reduces GHGs and, at the same time, gets us ready for climate change.”

But when Toronto Hydro recently applied to the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) for the rate increases it needed to start building a smart grid, it was rejected.

“So what we have in Toronto in the so-called inner core is a really, really old system with old switches and old infrastructure, and this old infrastructure, just like old people, is really susceptible to the heat,” Hartmann says. “So our electricity system is really not in good shape for dealing with climate change, either by helping us to reduce GHG emissions or by getting ready for the severe weather events that are going to hit.”

Loading.

Toronto Hydro, says Hartmann, is now going to the OEB with a new application, seeking “the absolutely bare minimum increase” to allow it to replace the oldest, worst equipment.

But it will not have the resources required to build a smart grid.

“The Ontario government has moved forward on trying to promote some renewable power sources but they’re going at a snail’s pace,” he observes.

The urgency for heat islands like Toronto is underscored by estimates that every additional degree of heat results in energy consumption of 4 per cent — hundreds of millions of dollars in production and distribution, and who knows how much more in GHGs.

Like most urban centres on the continent, Toronto has been attempting to “green” the city and municipal operations. There are ongoing energy retrofits to buildings, the installation of wind, solar and hydrogen facilities, funds to support conservation initiatives and renewable energy installations, plans to expand the Deep Lake Water Cooling System.

Do your laundry and turn on your dishwasher at night is the mantra to avoid overloading our fragile grid. There is also movement, in terms that would have been baffling a couple of generations ago, to “green roofs,” “smart houses,” residential solar hot-water heating, home energy audits.

Research suggests green roofs can cut annual energy consumption by up to 45 per cent, says the Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition, and over the last three years more than 113,000 square metres of new green roof area has been installed in Toronto with savings of 1.5 million kilowatt hours of energy.

Just as in health care, the Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition said in a report this year the focus should be on prevention of energy demand. “Taxpayer dollars spent on green infrastructure offer a greater return on investment because of the multiple economic, health and environmental benefits.”

If the front-end costs of environmental initiatives to address climate change make governments shudder, the price of environmental degradation and consequent health effects is also worth considering.

But the price of not being prepared can be measured not only in dollars, but in immediate and sudden devastation.


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'€œHow did you do that?'€ asked the girl behind the airline check-in counter who was impressed when I recited my flight booking computer code to Bangkok by heart.

Yes, I had turned my cold eight-digit reservation code, IDX2W131, into a funny short story that goes something like: '€œThe Indonesian Stock Market (IDX) sent two women (2W) to Bangkok (this is to make sure I remember where I am flying to), but they were unlucky (13) to be flying in the same plane with '€˜The Number One'€™.'€

People say that short notes are much better than a long memory, but now I enjoy memorizing long numbers, or anything that exercises my brain. This helps me not to rely too much on smartphones, which, thanks to their huge memory capacity, have spoiled our brain.

Once when I was keying in someone'€™s details a message popped up on the screen alerting me that the person was already in my contact list. Even worse, nowadays I can hardly remember my own 12-digit phone number.

A myth says that we use only 10 percent of our brain. Whether true or not, many studies have shown that our brain cells are likely to degenerate if they are rarely used. For example, blindness can occur if the eyes receive no visual stimuli early in development.

You could prevent your neural pathways from degenerating by regularly exercising your brain. Such exercises should be done correctly '€” otherwise your brain may become stressed or even '€œinjured'€, resulting, ironically, in memory loss.

The good news is that there is a method to train your brain. It is called Memory Sport.

I had an opportunity to spend a few days with Indonesia'€™s number one mnemonist Yudi Lesmana, a civil engineer and Grand Master of Memory, who ranked 52nd in the world.

Yudi can memorize the order of one shuffled deck of 52 playing cards in 47 seconds, memorize 210 random words in 15 minutes and, of course, he never has a problem remembering his ATM PINs.

'€œYou might admire a person with an athletic body. As there are no babies born with athletic bodies, there are also no persons possessing exceptional memory unless they regularly train and give their brains methods of exercise,'€ Yudi said.

Memorizing tricks have been developed since ancient times.

A technique known as the Memory Palace, for example, was '€œrefined and codified in an extensive set of rules and instruction manuals by Romans'€, Joshua Foer wrote in Moonwalking with Einstein '€” The Art and Science of Remembering Everything.

Now the method of memory training has been so much developed that an annual worldwide competition has been held since 1991 and followed by many regional and national level competitions and open tournaments.

What'€™s the point of memorizing meaningless sequences of numbers, or even remembering orders of random playing cards, aside from losing friends because you always win your poker nights?

Experts say that focusing on memorization may obstruct learning. Understanding things enables a person to apply a concept to a real-life situation, while memorizing only keeps the concept in mind.

Yet memory training is meant to help people improve their ways of learning, accelerate understanding and increase consciousness in working with information. By consciousness, I mean we think about the information we get, respect the details and shine a mental spotlight on it. We also ignore everything else that is not important.

This can be achieved, first by being mindful of the information you want to memorize, then by creating analogies, scenes or a story board that may catch your brain'€™s attention.

So build analogies and scenes you are familiar with, such as your home or your favorite places, and then create an exceptional imaginative story board, chaining to it the keywords you want to remember. Pour some emotion and excitement into your story. The more unusual your imagination, the easier it is for your brain to remember.

Try it! Take it from me: Memorizing can be challenging and fun. It teaches me to be mindful, imaginative and respect details. These are attitudes essential for learning and understanding things.

Relying too much on my smartphone has made me unmindful, ignorant and therefore dumber. So, it'€™s good to take notes. Just make sure you remember where you put those notes.

'€” Bey Sapta


New Year Resolutions for Kids

With the first week back to school almost under our belts, it’s a perfect time for your kids or students to set some New Year resolutions!

Experts say that kids between 6 -12 are at a great age to set and stick to resolutions. From more reading time, more exercise and fresh air to setting the breakfast bowls out the night before school. Here are some of our favourite resolutions…

Read for 20-30 minutes before bedtime. Setting out some more time for reading will help establish some good routines on school nights. Here are some of the best children’s books to read.

Set the dinner table. The kids can help set the table while dinner is being prepared. Another helpful way to keep them busy and away from the treat press before dinner time!

Game night Friday’s. Keep the Christmas board games out and set an hour or two each Friday for a family game night. A great way for some quality time without screens.

Learn to bake. Bake sale season will soon be upon us in schools, help the kids learn how to make some simple recipes like cookies or flapjacks.

Clean their bedroom. Once a week, a set time could be allocated for a quick bedroom tidy. Especially after the Christmas break, now is a great time to rebuild routines on school nights!

Experts say by getting the kids excited about 2 or 3 new goals or resolutions is a perfect load for them to take on and stick too.

We hope this helps with your little ones! Let us know how it goes or if you have any other resolutions that could help us or other readers!


Am I keeping you awake?

A small minority of listeners report that they fall asleep to Morning Extra on a regular basis, though I like to think that's restricted to those of you who work nightshift and it's no reflection on the programme. Mind you, either way, it's nice to provide a service!

If you can stay awake long enough, that's what we'll be discussing on Monday's Morning Extra. In another of BBC Radio Scotland's Investigations, our reporter Ken MacDonald looks at how working nights can affect your health — and I want to hear your experiences.

My only experience of working overnights was in the late 1990s when I presented the weekend 'Scottish Night Network' programmes on Scotland's local commercial radio stations. Now, I'll grant you that playing records on the wireless isn't exactly hard work, but it can still get boring nonetheless and come 4am I used to find myself nodding off during longer tracks such as Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" and Blur's "Beetlebum" (there's a song you never hear anymore — I wonder why?!)

Thankfully, the silence after the song faded out was sufficient enough to startle me out of my nap, just in time to lunge foward and splutter some half-garbled rubbish into the microphone (alas, some things have never changed.) However, my successor — we'll call him 'John', for that was his name — wasn't so fortunate. On one occassion he never rose from his nap and listeners were treated to the sweet sound of prolonged silence. Apparently listening figures had never been so high. Alas, the poor boy never worked in radio again, although at least he was as fresh as a daisy when he eventually woke-up to receive his P45! (Readers will be reassured to learn that John now answers emergency 999 calls.)

But should we blame him? A recent BBC Horizon programme highlighted the dangers of playing with our bodyclocks. As well as the health hazards of working nights, experts also reckon that we're more likely to have a heart attack at 8 o'clock in the morning and most likely to crash our car on the motorway at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. (Luckily, the only thing John ever crashed was the intro to Kate Bush!)

I was also happy to hear one expert on the programme say that the reason teenagers won't get out of bed in the morning is nothing to do with laziness and everything to do with the unique nature of young people's bodyclocks. Some schools are even considering a change to the daily timetable to take account of this. So if my mum's reading this post, there you have it: I wasn't a layabout all those years after all! I'm now putting my faith in the scientists to come up with an equally convincing theory to explain my continuing inability to get out of bed at the age of 33. I'm optimistic.

Anyway, the programme's available to watch on the BBC iPlayer until 21 April. I highly recommend it.

But, back on topic: Is the 24-hour society destroying our health? Are employers failing in their duty of care for us? And is it naive to think we can change this? Post your experiences here and call me Monday morning from 8am. If you're awake, that is!


Sleep Tales: The Rise of the Audio Book at Bedtime

Around six in 10 people report they have trouble dropping off to sleep at night but how often do you think about your bedtime routine and how it affects sleep? When you’re looking for a good night’s sleep it’s important to be relaxed. Your state of mind can have a.


Monday Nights Are Not Date Nights, Experts Say - Recipes

Glenn Straub says his life is way more organized since he sold the former Revel and left Atlantic City and all the related drama behind.

Now, he says, his life is framed around tennis, work, more tennis, and a latest venture into Argentinian grapes.

But things in Straub's home base of Florida are heating up nonetheless. In a bombshell report in the Palm Beach Post this week, two former girlfriends say Straub, 72, owner of the Palm Beach Polo Club, has turned to the courts to avenge their spurning of his romantic interest, and they cite three other women who court documents show have also been sued by Straub.

In a telephone interview Wednesday morning, Straub scoffed at the report, said he's trying to keep it out of the print paper, which he said he considered buying outright, and said, "They don't even know about four more."

The Palm Beach Post report names two women, Jessica Nicodemo, 34, and Lacy K. Bridges, 24, who, according to court documents, say Straub has filed "frivolous lawsuits against them as revenge for breaking off romantic relationships with him."

The Post reports that authorities have launched a criminal investigation into whether Straub physically threatened Nicodemo and directed his company, Palm Beach Polo, to file fraudulent liens against properties she owns.

Straub dismissed the report itself as frivolous.

"My dog bit the next door neighbor's dog, maybe you're going to put that in too," he said.

Joe Capozzi, the author of the Post report, said via e-mail that the story will run in print this Sunday, Nov. 25.

Straub said in the interview Wednesday that he filed suits against acquaintances, male and female, because he often lends people money or otherwise helps them in business after getting to know them socially. He said he was simply trying to recoup the loans.

"I'm a businessperson," he said, beginning one of the stream of consciousness answers that became familiar during the years he owned the closed Revel casino, which has since reopened under new owners as the Ocean Resort Casino.

Straub showed his litigious side after he bought Revel for $82 million out of bankruptcy in 2015, challenging the right of the Casino Control Commission to even demand that he get a license to operate a casino. For a time, he powered the place with generator trucks parked outside.

The casino and adjacent power plant, which Straub eventually bought for $30 million, were sold to Denver developer Bruce Deifik in 2018 for $200 million. Revel, valued at $2 billion, first opened April 2, 2012, and closed Sept. 2, 2014, after two declarations of bankruptcy. It was one of four Atlantic City casinos to close that year.

"During my relationships, I go out every night. I've been a bachelor for 13 years. I love my life right now, it's perfect. I date different girls, when I see they need something in life, loans. I want them to pay it back."

He said people know that "Glenn Straub will lend you money."

The Palm Beach Post report contains numerous details gleaned from court filings, including an incident where Straub drove his Bentley through the closed gate of his country club after being asked for identification, and dozens of text messages in which Straub begs Nicodemo to live with him and threatens to put a lien on her house, "the first day you don't check in."

Nicodemo's attorney Elizabeth Parker told the Post, "It's stalking through the courts."

The Post describes a case against Ashley Maguire, Mrs. Florida 2008, accused by Straub's company of manipulating it to receive an advance of $41,000 in cash and clothing, and a payment of about $100,000 to go toward leasing a home at Palm Beach Polo and a "luxury car.

"But Maquire 'never commenced a single day of work,' " the report states.

A third relationship described in the report concerns Lacy Bridges, a woman Straub says he met at a Palm Beach sushi bar. His lawsuit accuses her of taking $7,000 in jewelry and clothing owned by the company.

Straub expressed surprise in the interview Wednesday that anyone in Philadelphia or Atlantic City would be interested in his current legal issues. He said life is good since he stopped flying back and forth to Atlantic City on Spirit Airlines.

But he said he's not done with Atlantic City yet. He said he owns 70 properties, 50 of them outright, and would still develop the old municipal airport Bader Field in a heartbeat, if given the chance.

He declined to talk about the details of a provision of his sale of Revel to Deifik that calls for him to collect $1.50 for every car parked at the resort starting in 2021, a fee that jumps to $4 per car in 2028, according to testimony before the Casino Control Commission.

Straub says those fees would benefit "my kids's kids' kids. It's setting up for grandchildren. We'll make money off the state of New Jersey for the next 99 years."


The internet bandwagon

I admit it: I'm addicted to the internet. Like our addiction to the mobile phone, I find it almost impossible to imagine how we coped before Google. Of course many of you continue to cope without it, as you were quick to tell us on this morning's programme. But Hamish in Ayr told us he felt "forced" into using the web, especially for booking flights with a certain airline.

That's why Morning Extra remains primarily a phone-in programme. It's the one communication tool, more than any other, which nearly all of us have access to. Sure, it's nice to receive texts and emails, but nothing beats hearing a voice to convey people's passions, their frustrations and their joys. That's what makes good radio.

Which is precisely why I don't get the current obsession some radio presenters have with the internet bandwagon that is Twitter. Twitter is a bit like this blog, except that all posts (or 'tweets' as they're known) are limited to a maximum of 140 characters. More analysis here.

Twitter has its uses, including the potential to reconnect voters with their political representatives. You can now follow the moves of US President Barack Obama and check what Gordon Brown has been up to. And BBC News Scotland has it's own useful update on the latest stories (although I personally prefer using our RSS feed).

But. is there any point in radio presenters using it? At a recent radio event for students I was taken aback by the excitement Twitter was generating — not among the students, but purely among some of my industry colleagues. Two of them in particular were showing off their iPhones and bragging about all the 'tweets' they were following. One turned to me and said: "Aren't you using Twitter on your programme, Graham?"

"Eh, no," I sheepishly replied, feeling like some kind of luddite. I may be wrong, but I imagine most of our listeners have no interest in Twitter. As a fellow presenter friend of mine said to me the other night: "Why doesn't this industry just concentrate on making good radio, rather than obsessing over the latest internet fashions?"

He may have a point. A host I know on one of Scotland's biggest commercial radio stations updates his Twitter almost continuously. Yet there are only 386 people 'following' him. That's a tiny audience compared to the hundreds of thousands of people who tune into his radio show every week.

So, I'm in a dilemma: do I tweet? Or is tweeting just for twits?

Now, if you've read this far down you're clearly not a part of the digitial generation that's lost the ability to concentrate! That was the subject of BBC Radio 4's Analysis programme last night and a topic for conversation on today's Morning Extra. So tell me, is the internet making us stupid?


HalloweenTime at DLR Superthread #4

Hi everyone - first time poster but have been lurking/learning about the MHP nights experts for a few months.

I just wanted to say thank you to everyone (especially the vets) for all the information they have been sharing while we waited for the tickets to be released and I can't recall who posted that her sister had bought their tickets during the first release just after midnight but whoever you were - thank you, thank you, thank you!

I'd been checking all arvo today and sure enough just before 5pm our time (so about 3 hours ago and just after midnight) up it came. I nearly fell over with excitement!

We're coming over from Australia to celebrate my 40th, on Halloween (how lucky am I?!), at a MHP during the 60th year celebration - I mean seriously - does it get any better.

The girls and I have been looking at our tickets all night and as soon as I got them to bed, I wanted to get on here and say a huge THANKS.

Wishing you ALL, all the very best!

Seobaina

DIS Veteran

So thank god then went on at midnight since it is only 7pm here!
I got this message:
Your Order Has Not Been Completed
Thank you for your order.

Your confirmation is currently pending due to system availability. You will soon receive an email to inform you of the status of your order, once it is processed. If you have any questions, please contact the Disney Tickets Online Guest Services at [email protected] or by calling (714) 781-4400. Guests younger than age 18 must have parent or guardian permission to call.

JessieD

Earning My Ears

So thank god then went on at midnight since it is only 7pm here!
I got this message:
Your Order Has Not Been Completed
Thank you for your order.

Your confirmation is currently pending due to system availability. You will soon receive an email to inform you of the status of your order, once it is processed. If you have any questions, please contact the Disney Tickets Online Guest Services at [email protected] or by calling (714) 781-4400. Guests younger than age 18 must have parent or guardian permission to call.

Abbey1

DIS Veteran

Once I put in my credit card info etc, and click "Purchase", it takes me back to the review screen and says, "Some of the required payment information is missing or invalid. Please check your entries and try again."

I know that I am putting in all the info correctly. Is anyone else having this problem? Currently on hold.

RichP1269

Mouseketeer

Once I put in my credit card info etc, and click "Purchase", it takes me back to the review screen and says, "Some of the required payment information is missing or invalid. Please check your entries and try again."

I know that I am putting in all the info correctly. Is anyone else having this problem? Currently on hold.

Abbey1

DIS Veteran

Jammyjam25

DIS Veteran

Paul16451

Earning My Ears

Lorijohnhill

DIS Veteran

So thank god then went on at midnight since it is only 7pm here!
I got this message:
Your Order Has Not Been Completed
Thank you for your order.

Your confirmation is currently pending due to system availability. You will soon receive an email to inform you of the status of your order, once it is processed. If you have any questions, please contact the Disney Tickets Online Guest Services at [email protected] or by calling (714) 781-4400. Guests younger than age 18 must have parent or guardian permission to call.

JessieD

Earning My Ears

Canadian Harmony

DIS Veteran

Ok, So I wrote a letter to Disney. Here's hoping it gets results (I still have to buy our tickets this week):

Hi. My family and I are planning our first trip to DLR for my daughters' birthdays in October. We were so excited to find out that not only will we be able to celebrate 60 years of Disney magic, but also participate in Halloween Time.
We booked with our travel agent back in February/March and began planning all the exciting events we can attend. I waited for the announcement of dates for the Mickey Halloween Party and was over the moon to find out that the party we want to attend is falling on our oldest daughter's birthday!
But then I looked to see what was included for the higher cost this year:
- NO cavalcade - just the Paint The Night parade. While that's awesome, it's not really 'Halloween' specific. But ok, it's a parade.
- NO Carnival. Without the pumpkin carving, Day of the Dead, Conjure a Villain, crafts or games, it doesn't seem much like a Halloween Party.
I'm still going to take our kids because we've been talking up the whole "trick-or-treating at Disney on YOUR birthday" thing to them, but it's going to be quite a disappointment after spending so much money (even more after the lousy exchange rate we have now) to receive so little of the Disney magic.
It seems to me the high standard that Disneyland has always held itself to has slipped a little with this year's Halloween celebration. I really hope The Powers That Be change course slightly and bring back the Carnival area at Big Thunder Ranch for Halloween Time at Disneyland Resort.
Kind Regards

Emmybee

Mouseketeer

Mummabear

DIS Veteran

Sherry E

Currently tag-less.

Ok, So I wrote a letter to Disney. Here's hoping it gets results (I still have to buy our tickets this week):

Hi. My family and I are planning our first trip to DLR for my daughters' birthdays in October. We were so excited to find out that not only will we be able to celebrate 60 years of Disney magic, but also participate in Halloween Time.
We booked with our travel agent back in February/March and began planning all the exciting events we can attend. I waited for the announcement of dates for the Mickey Halloween Party and was over the moon to find out that the party we want to attend is falling on our oldest daughter's birthday!
But then I looked to see what was included for the higher cost this year:
- NO cavalcade - just the Paint The Night parade. While that's awesome, it's not really 'Halloween' specific. But ok, it's a parade.
- NO Carnival. Without the pumpkin carving, Day of the Dead, Conjure a Villain, crafts or games, it doesn't seem much like a Halloween Party.
I'm still going to take our kids because we've been talking up the whole "trick-or-treating at Disney on YOUR birthday" thing to them, but it's going to be quite a disappointment after spending so much money (even more after the lousy exchange rate we have now) to receive so little of the Disney magic.
It seems to me the high standard that Disneyland has always held itself to has slipped a little with this year's Halloween celebration. I really hope The Powers That Be change course slightly and bring back the Carnival area at Big Thunder Ranch for Halloween Time at Disneyland Resort.
Kind Regards

Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos is coming back -- it's not part of the Halloween Carnival. It's just a display set up in Frontierland.

The Carnival is usually not part of the Halloween Party, per se. The Carnival is usually closed for the bulk of the party -- so no crafts or games during the party. The Carnival was/is mainly part of the daytime roster of Halloween Time enjoyment, available for anyone to enjoy (even if they don't buy party tickets). I am certain that some sort of Villain photo spot will be put somewhere in the daytime, as will the other characters in Halloween attire. Pirates League may even be put somewhere else in Disneyland. It's just the pumpkin carvers that appear to not be back this year (unless something top secret is in the works), and the general Carnival area sounds as though it is not happening this year (with everything concentrated in one place). There will likely be elements of the Carnival broken up and put elsewhere, but the actual Carnival sounds as if it is not happening.

But none of this has been officially publicized by Disney, so there is no telling what's in the works. I brought the info here to this thread to share with everyone, but it's not anything that the people reading the emails will know anything about just yet. They may not know until Halloween Time begins, sadly.