Other

Easy Aioli


Makes about ⅔ cup Servings

July 2008

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves, pressed

  • ¼ teaspoon (or more) coarse kosher salt

  • ½ cup mayonnaise

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

  • Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Mash garlic and ¼ tsp. salt in a small bowl until a paste forms. Whisk in mayonnaise, oil, and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Do Ahead: Aioli can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Recipe by Amy Finley

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Easy Aioli

Eggs should keep a consistent and low temperature. This is best achieved by placing their carton in the center of your fridge. The eggs should also remain in their original packaging to avoid the absorption of strong odors.

It is wise to follow the “best by” date to determine overall freshness, but eggs can be tested by simply dropping them into a bowl of water. Older eggs will float while fresh eggs will sink. This is due to the size of their air cells, which gradually increase over time.

Cooked eggs have a refrigerator shelf life of no more than four days, while hard-boiled eggs, peeled or unpeeled, are safe to consume up to one week after they’re prepared.

How to Cook Eggs

The beauty of an egg is its versatility. Eggs can be cooked in a variety of ways. Here are some tips in accomplishing the four most common preparations.

Scrambled: Whip your eggs in a bowl. The consistency of your scrambled eggs is a personal preference, though it seems like the majority of breakfast connoisseurs enjoy a more runny and fluffy option. In this case, add about ¼ cup of milk for every four eggs. This will help to thin the mix. Feel free to also season with salt and pepper (or stir in cream cheese for added decadence). Grease a skillet with butter over medium heat and pour in the egg mixture. As the eggs begin to cook, begin to pull and fold the eggs with a spatula until it forms curds. Do not stir constantly. Once the egg is cooked to your liking, remove from heat and serve.

Hard-boiled: Fill a pot that covers your eggs by about two inches. Remove the eggs and bring the water to a boil. Once the water begins to boil, carefully drop in the eggs and leave them for 10-12 minutes. For easy peeling, give the eggs an immediate ice bath after the cooking time is completed. For soft-boiled eggs, follow the same process, but cut the cooking time in half.

Poached: Add a dash of vinegar to a pan filled with steadily simmering water. Crack eggs individually into a dish or small cup. With a spatula, create a gentle whirlpool in the pan. Slowly add the egg, whites first, into the water and allow to cook for three minutes. Remove the egg with a slotted spoon and immediately transfer to kitchen paper to drain the water.

Sunny Side Up/Over Easy/Medium/Hard: For each of these preparations, you are cracking an egg directly into a greased frying pan. For sunny side up, no flipping is involved. Simply allow the edges to fry until they’re golden brown. To achieve an over easy egg, flip a sunny side up egg and cook until a thin film appears over the yolk. The yolk should still be runny upon serving. An over medium egg is flipped, fried, and cooked longer until the yolk is still slightly runny. An over hard is cooked until the yolk is hard.

How to Freeze Eggs

Eggs can easily be frozen, but instructions vary based on the egg’s physical state. As a general rule, uncooked eggs in their shells should not be frozen. They must be cracked first and have their contents frozen.

Uncooked whole eggs: The eggs must be removed from their shells, blended, and poured into containers that can seal tightly.

Uncooked egg whites: The same process as whole eggs, but you can freeze whites in ice cube trays before transferring them to an airtight container. This speeds up the thawing process and can help with measuring.

Uncooked yolks: Egg yolks alone can turn extremely gelatinous if frozen. For use in savory dishes, add ⅛ teaspoon of salt per four egg yolks. Substitute the salt for sugar for use in sweet dishes and/or desserts.

Cooked eggs: Scrambled eggs are fine to freeze, but it is advised to not freeze cooked egg whites. They become too watery and rubbery if not mixed with the yolk.

Hard-boiled eggs: As mentioned above, it is best to not freeze hard-boiled eggs because cooked whites become watery and rubbery when frozen.

Ingredients (7)

  • 2 medium garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup grapeseed or vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Kosher salt
  • Calories 202
  • Fat 22.34g
  • Saturated fat 2.37g
  • Trans fat 0.09g
  • Carbs 0.33g
  • Fiber 0.04g
  • Sugar 0.06g
  • Protein 0.69g
  • Cholesterol 18.6mg
  • Sodium 12.95mg
  • Nutritional Analysis per serving (10 servings)Powered by

What Is Aioli?

Like mayonnaise, aioli is an emulsion. We all know oil and water don’t mix, but through the wizardry of kitchen science, liquid can be broken into many tiny droplets and forced to combine with oil.

With aioli, as with mayonnaise, this is achieved by very slowly whisking oil into an egg yolk mixed with lemon juice or a small amount of liquid. Start by adding just a few drops at a time, and then as the emulsion begins to coalesce, you can add a little more at a time. The key is to go slowly.


If you have a food processor, this aioli recipe from Savory Simple can come together in five minutes. Use pasteurized eggs (or pasteurize them yourself) since they will be consumed raw once you make the aioli, and use up the aioli within two weeks. Try adding in pesto, Sriracha, or truffle oil for a flavored aioli, and use it as a dip for steamed artichokes or a dressing for chicken salad.

Courtesy of Minimalist Baker

This chipotle aioli recipe from Minimalist Baker doesn't use eggs, it's actually vegan. It subs in cashews and almond milk as a creamy base—but you won't taste the nuts due to the smoky chipotles in adobo sauce that get blitzed in. Drizzle it over roasted potatoes or tacos, use on your crudités tray, make fries extra special, or spread onto your favorite sandwich.


With only seven simple ingredients you most likely already have in your kitchen, this sauce is wonderfully simple to make.

  • sunflower oil – Canola oil or even extra virgin olive oil can be substituted as well.
  • whole egg – The egg acts as an emulsifier for the sauce.
  • egg yolk – This helps stabilize and provide a smooth texture.
  • dijon mustard – To kick up the flavor and give it that extra bite!
  • lemon juice – The tart citrus flavor pairs so wonderfully with the savory garlic!
  • salt – Enough to taste and balance the other flavors.
  • garlic cloves – Two garlic cloves can provide a noticeable, potent garlicky flavor that is sure to make your mouth water. However, you can adjust to more or less garlic as desired. Consider using roasted garlic, I have a wonderful tutorial on how to roast garlic here.

Omit the garlic for a lovely, light Lemon Aioli!


What is aioli?

Aioli is an emulsion made with garlic and oil. This is obvious from its name as the term &ldquoaioli,&rdquo often spelled &ldquoallioli,&rdquo comes from &ldquoall i oli,&rdquo meaning &ldquogarlic and oil,&rdquo in the Valencian and Catalán languages.

Traditionally, alioli was made in this region in a mortar with a pestle using only garlic and olive oil with a little salt. No egg was used to help form the emulsion.

Making traditional aioli with a mortar and pestle

Traditional aioli, though, is very finicky.

The garlic and salt are beaten into a paste with the pestle, and olive oil is added in, drop by drop, while continuously mixing it in a circular movement until an emulsion is formed. As the emulsion builds up and gets more stable, you can drizzle in small amounts of oil at a time, continuing to incorporate it into the emulsion before adding more oil. (My husband says that you can tell when it&rsquos time to add more oil when you feel the mixture get thick and provide resistance to your movement.) That said, you have to be very careful.

You can&rsquot stop moving the pestle, and the oil must be trickled in ever-so-slowly. Some say that even by changing the direction of the circular movement is enough to cut the emulsion and keep it from properly forming. And, as I mentioned earlier, adding too much oil at a time can break the mixture and mean that you have to start all over again.

So, to make a traditional aioli, one needs patience and persistence. When it comes to this sort of thing, knowing that there is an easy alternative, neither is my forté.

To be honest, I have tried to make traditional aioli several times, always unsuccessfully! Yes, always!

That&rsquos why I &ldquohired&rdquo my husband to make a batch for me in my video for how to make aioli (both ways). He is much more patient than I am with this sort of thing.


  • 3/4 Cups mayonnaise
  • 1 Teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Thai sweet chili sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon sriracha
  • Juice of 1/2 a lime
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Step 1: In a medium bowl, combine 3/4 cup mayonnaise, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, 2 tablespoons Thai sweet chili sauce, 1 tablespoon sriracha and the juice of 1/2 a lime.

Step 2: Whisk until smooth. Season with kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Makes 1 cup.


this classic Spanish sauce usually keeps for up to one week in the fridge though I really doubt it would last that long because it's so good. In our home, it's usually gone in a day! To store alioli, transfer it to a container and refrigerate. I don't recommend freezing this condiment.

The main difference between aioli and mayonnaise is that the first one uses garlic and olive oil whereas mayonnaise calls for canola oil and leaves out the garlic. While the texture is similar since both recipes use eggs as emulsifiers, the flavors are very different.
What you see on a restaurant menu as garlic aioli sauce could just be mayonnaise mixed with some garlic. The term is becoming very similar to "mayo with garlic" and while they're not actually exactly the same thing, they're pretty similar.

Yes. Just like mayonnaise, this sauce also uses raw eggs that are beaten and mixed with oil. However, it's good to know that store-bought emolsified sauce such as mayonnaise are made with pasteurized eggs. You can get pasteurized eggs at the supermarket or, if making this recipe with regular eggs, keep them cold just to be safe.


  1. Chop the chipotle peppers. Place the chipotle peppers on a cutting board and chop with the garlic until they are both finely minced.
  2. Combine the ingredients. Scoop the mayonnaise into a small mixing bowl. Add the chopped garlic/chipotle peppers to the mayo. Stir in the vinegar, honey, onion powder, cumin, salt, and pepper. Mix until it&rsquos well combined and creamy.
  3. Serve or chill. Serve this easy chipotle aioli immediately or store in the fridge until ready to use.

This aioli contains small chunks of garlic and chipotle since it&rsquos added minced, but you can easily make it extra smooth by processing the chipotle and garlic in a food processor to turn it into a fine puree.


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This mock aioli, made with mayo instead of raw egg and oil, is delicious over crab cakes or tossed into a seafood salad or coleslaw. And it takes just minutes to make.

Tips for Eggs

Eggs should keep a consistent and low temperature. This is best achieved by placing their carton in the center of your fridge. The eggs should also remain in their original packaging to avoid the absorption of strong odors.

It is wise to follow the “best by” date to determine overall freshness, but eggs can be tested by simply dropping them into a bowl of water. Older eggs will float while fresh eggs will sink. This is due to the size of their air cells, which gradually increase over time.

Cooked eggs have a refrigerator shelf life of no more than four days, while hard-boiled eggs, peeled or unpeeled, are safe to consume up to one week after they’re prepared.

The beauty of an egg is its versatility. Eggs can be cooked in a variety of ways. Here are some tips in accomplishing the four most common preparations.

Scrambled: Whip your eggs in a bowl. The consistency of your scrambled eggs is a personal preference, though it seems like the majority of breakfast connoisseurs enjoy a more runny and fluffy option. In this case, add about ¼ cup of milk for every four eggs. This will help to thin the mix. Feel free to also season with salt and pepper (or stir in cream cheese for added decadence). Grease a skillet with butter over medium heat and pour in the egg mixture. As the eggs begin to cook, begin to pull and fold the eggs with a spatula until it forms curds. Do not stir constantly. Once the egg is cooked to your liking, remove from heat and serve.

Hard-boiled: Fill a pot that covers your eggs by about two inches. Remove the eggs and bring the water to a boil. Once the water begins to boil, carefully drop in the eggs and leave them for 10-12 minutes. For easy peeling, give the eggs an immediate ice bath after the cooking time is completed. For soft-boiled eggs, follow the same process, but cut the cooking time in half.

Poached: Add a dash of vinegar to a pan filled with steadily simmering water. Crack eggs individually into a dish or small cup. With a spatula, create a gentle whirlpool in the pan. Slowly add the egg, whites first, into the water and allow to cook for three minutes. Remove the egg with a slotted spoon and immediately transfer to kitchen paper to drain the water.

Sunny Side Up/Over Easy/Medium/Hard: For each of these preparations, you are cracking an egg directly into a greased frying pan. For sunny side up, no flipping is involved. Simply allow the edges to fry until they’re golden brown. To achieve an over easy egg, flip a sunny side up egg and cook until a thin film appears over the yolk. The yolk should still be runny upon serving. An over medium egg is flipped, fried, and cooked longer until the yolk is still slightly runny. An over hard is cooked until the yolk is hard.

Eggs can easily be frozen, but instructions vary based on the egg’s physical state. As a general rule, uncooked eggs in their shells should not be frozen. They must be cracked first and have their contents frozen.

Uncooked whole eggs: The eggs must be removed from their shells, blended, and poured into containers that can seal tightly.

Uncooked egg whites: The same process as whole eggs, but you can freeze whites in ice cube trays before transferring them to an airtight container. This speeds up the thawing process and can help with measuring.

Uncooked yolks: Egg yolks alone can turn extremely gelatinous if frozen. For use in savory dishes, add ⅛ teaspoon of salt per four egg yolks. Substitute the salt for sugar for use in sweet dishes and/or desserts.

Cooked eggs: Scrambled eggs are fine to freeze, but it is advised to not freeze cooked egg whites. They become too watery and rubbery if not mixed with the yolk.

Hard-boiled eggs: As mentioned above, it is best to not freeze hard-boiled eggs because cooked whites become watery and rubbery when frozen.