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Watch a Bro Dressed as a Gorilla Chase a Bro Dressed as a Banana


Just because it's after a 3-day weekend, and we discovered Beyoncé lip-synched

We're settling into our mid-afternoon lull here, which basically means finding the best food-related viral videos out there, and while we sometimes find some cool invisible driver prank, this one is just ridiculous.

It seems like a frat at a certain Trinity College had their pledges dress up as a gorilla and a banana, and then had the pledge dressed as a gorilla chase around the guy in the banana suit. Stupid, yes. Ridiculous, yes, but still completely amazing. Gorilla pledge even goes to the local café to buy a real banana, as banana pledge hides out in a tree, behind a trash can, and eventually gets tackled (oops, sorry, we spoiled the ending).

Watch for a good five minutes of amusement, and notice how nobody seems to cares that there is a gorilla chasing a banana around their library. Oh, college. (Fair warning: the sound track to this video is Black Eyed Peas. Mute if you find that offensive).


If you want to know what’s going on, and if your subconscious is trying to send you a message, I’ve got you covered!

In this article, we will observe the 10 most common themes about being chased in a dream, and their meanings.

Keep reading and you’ll discover:

What does it mean if you are being chased in a dream?
Spiritual meaning of being chased in a dream
What does it mean when you dream about someone chasing you and trying to kill or hurt you?
What does it mean when you dream about running away from someone?
Dreams about being chased by police or soldiers
Dreams about being chased by animals
Dreams of being chased by a madman
Dreams about being chased but can’t run
Dreams about chasing someone
Dream of being hunted down


Contents

Donkey Kong series

Donkey Kong

Lady makes her debut appearance in the 1981 arcade game Donkey Kong as one of the first damsels-in-distress in any video game made before that time.

Lady is kidnapped by Donkey Kong, a pet gorilla who was owned by her boyfriend Mario. Β] Γ] She is taken up onto a building and loses various articles (such as her parasol, hat and bag, which can be collected for bonus Points) on the way. Mario then climbs up the building, avoiding all the hazards in the way, to rescue her. However, when Mario reaches the top of the building, Donkey Kong grabs Lady and takes her higher up, forcing Mario to do another level. After four levels, Donkey Kong is trapped as Mario removes the bolts from the platform, sending Donkey Kong plummeting. Lady is finally saved by Mario, and they share a special moment together.

Donkey Kong (Game & Watch)

Lady also appears in the Game & Watch game Donkey Kong. Like in the arcade game, she was kidnapped by the titular ape and brought to a construction site, with the objective being to have Mario rescue her by cutting wires holding Donkey Kong's platform together.

Donkey Kong (Game Boy)

Eventually, Pauline is given a revised appearance and is featured in the Game Boy rendition of Donkey Kong. Mario pursues Donkey Kong (and his son Donkey Kong Jr.) as Pauline is carried across a variety of locales. Once more, Pauline is eventually rescued by Mario. The two are then shown in a Mushroom Kingdom setting where Pauline supplies Mario with a Super Mushroom. Donkey Kong then attempts to best Mario one last time, but the tables turn when the crushed Mario lifts Donkey Kong as Super Mario, alarming his son. Afterwards, they had their photo taken at one of the previous levels, Rocky-Valley.

Saturday Supercade

Pauline appears as a regular character in the Donkey Kong episodes within the Saturday Supercade show. Voiced by Judy Strangis Δ] , Pauline plays the role as Mario's assistant or partner and is often seen to be alongside him in the various episodes. The two work together to capture Donkey Kong throughout the series. Pauline can also be seen helping Stanley in another episode.

Pinball

Lady appears in the Breakout-like mode of Pinball, where she is held inside the breakable blocks and has to be caught by Mario before she hits the floor. This is technically the first game where she was depicted in her standard brunette appearance rather than her blonde appearance.

Family BASIC

Lady is a usable sprite in the Family BASIC accessory for the Family Computer. The Family BASIC allows users to make their own programs. Her default appearance as seen on the Message Board is similar to Pinball but in Family BASIC V3, she appears in one of the mini-games sharing the same palette as Mario.

Game & Watch Gallery series

In Game & Watch Gallery 2 and Game & Watch Gallery 4, Pauline herself doesn't appear in the Modern version of Donkey Kong (that role instead being taken over by Princess Peach), but she does appear in the game's Classic mode, re-enacting the same role as in the game.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong series

Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis

Pauline makes her next reappearance after a twelve year absence in Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis. The games starts with the grand opening of the Super Mini Mario World theme park, where Pauline is Mario's guest of honor. The manual suggests that Mario and Pauline are just friends at this time. Ε]

Donkey Kong is working at the Mario Toy Company, Ζ] and when he sees Pauline, he becomes infatuated and presents her with a Mini Donkey Kong. When she chooses Mario's proffered Mini Mario over his gift, however, Donkey Kong becomes enraged and kidnaps Pauline. Mario eventually defeats Donkey Kong and rescues Pauline with the help of his Mini Marios, and Pauline makes peace between them all by accepting Donkey Kong's Mini.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again!

Pauline appears again as a damsel-in-distress in Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again!. Once again, Pauline is assisting Mario in the opening of the expansion of Super Mini Mario World. Donkey Kong waits in a line to buy admissions tickets only to arrive at the front when the tickets are sold out. Donkey Kong, furious, pushes his way through a crowd of Toads and snatches Pauline. Mario attempts to stop this, ripping Pauline's dress in the process, but Donkey Kong escapes to the roof with Pauline. Mario then sends the Mini Mario toys in pursuit of Donkey Kong to rescue Pauline.

Mario eventually reaches the top floor, where he opens a door to find Pauline by a window in a small room. However, Donkey Kong turns the lights off and escapes through the window with Pauline, and Mario once more gives chase through another round of floors that the Mini Mario toys must navigate. Once Mario makes it to the end of these floors, he finds Pauline in a similar room, but this time, she is holding a clipboard and standing happily next to Donkey Kong, some Toads and the Mini Mario toys. She informs the confused Mario that the Mini Mario toys have passed the test run, revealing that Donkey Kong had kidnapped Pauline to test the performance of the toys and she is completely fine and happy. Mario shrugs it off seeing as he had such a great time traversing the theme park with his Minis and all is well.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Mini-Land Mayhem!

Pauline makes another appearance in Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Mini-Land Mayhem! Mario and Pauline are welcoming customers to the grand opening of "Mini-Land" by giving away Mini Pauline toys to the first 100 customers. Donkey Kong, excitedly charges his way to the front wanting a Pauline Mini toy for himself, but when he arrives, Mario sternly tells him that they are out of stock. Donkey Kong becomes enraged and kidnaps Pauline instead, heading into the theme park. Mario once again gives chase immediately with assistance from the Mini-Land toys.

After navigating the Minis though all the theme park's attractions, Mario locates Pauline standing just below a Ferris wheel. She welcomes her hero Mario warmly before Donkey Kong surprises them both by jumping from the top of the Ferris wheel to scoop Pauline up once again, forcing Mario to pursue him through more of the theme park's areas.

After chasing Donkey Kong through the theme park again, Mario finally finds Pauline once more under the Ferris wheel this time, however, when Donkey Kong appears to confront him, Mario presents him with a Mini Pauline toy. Donkey Kong is overjoyed, and Pauline ultimately finds the whole thing very sweet. She makes her way to the Ferris wheel, where she, Donkey Kong, Mario, and the Minis enjoy a ride in celebration.

Mario and Donkey Kong: Minis on the Move

Pauline reappears in Mario and Donkey Kong: Minis on the Move. She runs Mini-Land with Donkey Kong where they open a game arcade using the mini toys. Pauline is not kidnapped in this game, but hosts the Minigames mode and is seen simply congratulating players on their scores alongside Donkey Kong at the end of certain modes.

Pauline's face appears as an icon in the Mini Target Smash game in Minigames mode. Smashing a Pauline target can cause the player to lose 100, 200, or 300 points, depending on the target's position. Mini Pauline toys also take a more active role in this game although they are the last toy to be unlocked, they are still available for play early in the game and can be used in all modes except Minigames mode, in which only Mini Mario is playable. As with most characters in this title, Pauline herself takes a background role and leaves the spot light to the Mini toys.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars

Pauline is once more the victim of Donkey Kong's kidnapping antics at the very start of Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars. Though no motivation is given, Mario quickly gives chase with his Mini Mario toys in hopes of rescuing Pauline from the gorilla's grasp.

After traversing six puzzle filled worlds, Mario catches up to Donkey Kong and Pauline in a darkened room, the lights are switched on quickly and Pauline and Donkey Kong are standing at the ready in front of a "surprise" banner with two Toads to greet Mario. The adventure was just a game to lure Mario to a surprise party the two had organized for him (similar to the plot of Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again!). At first Mario is confused, but soon shrugs it off to enjoy the fun, now surrounded by his friends, balloons and mini toys. The ruse revealed, Mario can then continues through more fun worlds and bonus levels knowing Pauline is happy and safe.

Super Smash Bros. series

Pauline appears in the Masterpiece demo of the original Donkey Kong included in Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U. In every installment as of Super Smash Bros. Brawl, one of Peach's alternate costumes depicts her with a red dress that is similar in colorization to Pauline's dress.

Super Smash Bros. Brawl

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Pauline appears as a sticker that increases Diddy Kong and Donkey Kong's attacks.

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U

A trophy of Pauline appears in both Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, while Pauline herself appears in the latter version in her original role in the Donkey Kong Masterpiece. Pauline is also alluded to in the Event match titled "1988": "DK and Diddy have gone back in time. Now Mario's angry at them for kidnapping Pauline. but he's got the wrong guys!" An additional inclusion is in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U where she is mentioned in one of the randomly generated tips that appear on loading screen or in the tips section in the Original Games / Settings category (shown with a blue border), and reads: "Mario's Ex-Girlfriend(?) The woman kidnapped by DK in the original Donkey Kong was Mario's first love, Pauline. Originally, she was just called "Lady." We've come a long way."

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

Pauline along with the band appears in the background of New Donk City Hall in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate if "Jump Up, Super Star!" is selected as the stage's background music. The song's vocals are absent at first, and Pauline appears randomly on a propeller platform as the stage's main platform ascends the tower. If a fighter jumps past her, she starts to sing, and later appears in the plaza with the rest of the band.

Pauline also appears as two Legend-class spirits: one as a grab-type, primary spirit together with Donkey Kong (under the name "Donkey Kong & Lady") using their original artwork, which slightly increases the power of grabs and throws when equipped and one as a support spirit by herself using her artwork from Super Mario Odyssey, which allows the user to recover health when an opponent attacks their shield. The latter can be obtained in the World of Light, where the player must defeat her puppet fighter, Peach, in 1 minute and 30 seconds while avoiding Mario with a Hammer (in his wedding outfit) and a giant Donkey Kong (in his red-furred alternate costume, resembling the original Donkey Kong) on 75 m.

Super Mario Odyssey

Marking her debut in the main Super Mario series, Pauline appears in Super Mario Odyssey as the mayor of New Donk City (addressed as Mayor Pauline).

She first appears shortly after Mario arrives at New Donk City, where she, alongside several New Donkers, observes Bowser's Airship in the sky and the city being hit by a rainstorm. She then explains to Mario she cannot talk with him at the moment because New Donk City is currently in a crisis: she explains that Bowser had arrived at the city and has been causing chaos, and admitted she was not impressed with his plastering posters advertising his planned wedding with Princess Peach, stating it was "tasteless". Afterward, she then thanks Mario for saving the city as it meant everything to her, and invited him to set up the city festival.

Prior to the upcoming city festival itself, Pauline asks Mario to help rebuild her band, for which she serves as the lead singer. After that, she then tasked Mario with checking out the underground power plant and restore power. Ultimately, by the time Mario arrived at the power plant, Pauline was present, as she decided to assess the situation herself and deduced Bowser was responsible for the sabotage. They then fixed the power together, and then she personally invited Mario for the New Donk City festival as the guest of honor to repay him for making the festival possible. She is the interpreter of "Jump Up, Super Star!", the theme song of the game. In addition, the reason she returns and acts as mayor of New Donk City is to avert the idea that the presence of a kingdom necessarily means that the people in charge are royalty. Η]

She is later seen at the wedding between Bowser and Peach on the Moon Kingdom just as Mario enters, having been forced by the former to attend. She tells Mario he is "just in time."

In the post-game, Pauline is able to quiz Mario on facts about herself. She says that her hat is her favorite possession, she loves eating cake, and that her capture in Donkey Kong was "traumatic", although it helped her grow as a person. She also indicated that she had already seen Seaside Kingdom by the time she met up with Mario, and desired to see Cloud Kingdom next, due to it having "clouds that go on forever."

She later appears at Darker Side alongside the band and various other characters to root for Mario as he undergoes the rigorous challenge. During this time, she replaces her hat with a hat similar to that of Mario's own hat.

When the harder version of the final boss is beaten, Pauline appears on the picture with the other major characters of the game at the Mushroom Kingdom that is rewarded to the player after the ending credits.

Mario Tennis Aces

Pauline reappears in Mario Tennis Aces in her Mario vs. Donkey Kong appearance as a playable character that was first available by participating in the March 2019 tournament. ⎖] This marks her first fully playable appearance and her first appearance in a Mario sports title. She wears a sport outfit akin to that of Peach, Daisy, and Rosalina. She is classified as a Speedy type character, having the fastest movement in the game combined with low traction, but she is easily pushed back by returned shots. Her voice clips are reused from Super Mario Odyssey. Her Special Shot, named Showstopper, involves her dancing atop a building similar to the New Donk City Hall as it gets taller, with a crowd of New Donkers surrounding it during this Special Shot, "Jump Up, Super Star!" plays. Her emblem resembles a pair of red lips stylized into a heart shape. Prior to version 3.0.0, Pauline's name was erroneously written entirely in capital letters in the English version.

Mario Kart Tour

Pauline makes her debut in the Mario Kart series in Mario Kart Tour as a High-End playable character. Although she was officially confirmed in the first episode of the Mario Kart Tour News video series on September 24, 2019 (one day prior to the game's release), her name was accidentally shown on the game's App Store story page on August 27, confirming that she would appear in some capacity, ⎗] but was later removed. ⎘] Her special item is the Lucky Seven. ⎙] She was introduced in the New York Tour as a tour-exclusive character, but starting with the Holiday Tour, she became a regular character, while also gaining her own self-themed cup. Additionally, she has a High-End alternate playable variant called Pauline (Party Time) wearing an outfit representing the New Year for the Holiday Tour, where she drives a Platinum Taxi and has a New Year's 2020 glider, with her special item being the Coin Box. This makes her the first newcomer to the Mario Kart series to receive an alternate variant in this game. A second variant for Pauline themed around Valentine's Day called Pauline (Rose) was introduced in the Peach vs. Daisy Tour as a High-End character, with the Fire Flower as her special item. Her association with New York Minute, New York Minute 2, and New York Minute 3 is most likely an indirect reference to her status as the mayor of New Donk City, which is based on New York City.

Mario Golf: Super Rush

This section is referring to a subject in an upcoming or recently released game. When the game is released, or more information about this subject is found, this section may need major rewriting. This notice should be removed after a month has passed since the game was first released.

Pauline appears in Mario Golf: Super Rush as a playable character, marking her first appearance in the Mario Golf series. ⎚]

Other appearances, references, and cameos

Pauline never makes an appearance in Donkey Kong Jr. itself, although the back flyer does reference Donkey Kong's earlier abduction of her, citing that Mario's motive for imprisoning Donkey Kong was namely to make sure Donkey Kong cannot abduct her or any other woman again. In addition, the arcade version's transition scene between Stage 2 and Stage 3 has the titular son of Donkey Kong pursuing Mario's helicopter while riding a parasol resembling Pauline's parasol.

In the 1993 live-action film Super Mario Bros., Mario has a Brooklynite girlfriend referred to in the script as Daniella Pauline Verducci [citation needed] , although she is referred only to as Daniella on-screen. The woman also roughly resembles Pauline and is even seen in a construction site with a chimpanzee at one point (the latter being Anthony Scapelli having been de-evolved by President Koopa).

In the first issue of Blip, the damsel kidnapped by Donkey Kong in the Donkey Kong-inspired strip resembles Lady, although Mario claims to Vic Video that he does not know her.

She was given an indirect mention in the Nintendo Comics System story Cloud Burst, where Mario alluded to a past girlfriend who was comparable to Princess Toadstool as well as to some extent Luigi and Bowser.

Pauline appears in volume 11 of the Super Mario-Kun manga. She is described as a person whose appearance is "brighter" and "more gorgeous" than Peach. She is a major character in the Donkey Kong history of this volume: in this history, she runs a shop called "Pauline's Fashionable Store", that sells fire and frog suits for Mario. Donkey Kong later enters the store to buy a new tie. Mario is also in the store and recommends Donkey Kong to buy a collar. Donkey Kong get furious and takes a tie and Pauline to the top of a construction site, resembling Donkey Kong's (arcade) scenario.

In the 2nd volume of Super Mario-Kun on the Donkey Kong (Arcade) rechapter, Lady is shown in her usual damsel-in-distress role, but when Mario comes to save her she says "Kong is still better."

Although Pauline herself does not make an appearance in Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest, she, and more specifically Cranky Kong's abduction of her in the original game was alluded to in the manual (intro in the GBA version) where Cranky, while lecturing Donkey Kong, said "Whisking off maidens and throwing barrels around the place seven days a week, I was."

She appears in Game & Watch Collection in a recreation of Donkey Kong, serving the same role.

Pauline makes small appearances in the Nintendo Monopoly and Donkey Kong Jenga board games. She also makes a cameo in Nintendo Land, where she is seen in the background while playing the Donkey Kong's Crash Course attraction. In NES Remix, she appears in most of the challenges and remixes based on Donkey Kong and Pinball. She also has the same role in Ultimate NES Remix, which combined games from both NES Remix and NES Remix 2 for Nintendo 3DS.

Pauline also appears in the Puzzle Swap panel "Nintendo Heroines/Starlets" in StreetPass Mii Plaza, alongside Peach, Rosalina, Zelda, and Toon Zelda.

Pauline appears as a statue in Super Mario Run during the Super Mario Odyssey event. Along with the three other main character statues of Mario, Peach & Bowser (in their respective wedding outfits), the Pauline statue makes an appearance between November 14, 2017 - November 19, 2017. She also appeared in Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker for the Nintendo Switch and 3DS in a cameo on one of New Donk City's billboards.

Pauline also appears in both WarioWare: D.I.Y. Showcase and WarioWare Gold in the microgame Donkey Kong, where she plays her role from the original Donkey Kong arcade game. She appears in the same stance in another Donkey Kong-based microgame from WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$!.

Although she does not appear in either Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story or its remake, she is indirectly referenced by Kuzzle in the latter, during the Bowser Jr.'s Journey mode when he spots Kaley and Beef fly past, mistakes the former for one of his grandaughters. While rattling off the names of his granddaughters, "Pauline" is one of the names listed.

Pauline, or more accurately her debut role, was given an indirect reference in Baten Kaitos Origins, where the character Guillo sarcastically asks Gibari, "What are you, some monkey who's run off with a pretty wench?" after witnessing the latter take out several guards with a barrel.


In "The Seven Faces of Genie", Genie is seen wearing a plumber outfit similar to what Mario and Luigi wore in Mario Bros..

Ocho is a recurring character that appears as an 8-bit alien, and is used for many references to Mario and other video game franchises. As an example, in "The Tape", Ocho hits a gigantic, yellow block similar to a ? Block to get cash for a vending machine. During gym class, he also uses a cheat which gives him a rainbow appearance and speeds him up, similar to a Super Star.

The premise of the later episode "The Uncle" is that Ocho has an uncle called Mario who has a go-kart, is scared of ghosts and likes dinosaurs, stars and princesses Gumball takes this to mean that his uncle is the same Mario from the video games in his excitement, he goes around Elmore jumping over people's heads and entering pipes, with similar melodies such as one close to the Level Clear theme from Super Mario Bros. playing, and even repeating Mario's catchphrases (e.g. "Yahoo!" and "Let's-a go!"). Later, Ocho's Uncle Mario actually appearst playing golf with Ocho, wearing an outfit similar to the actual Mario and a vaguely similar saying to his catchphrase ("Hey, it's me, Mario" instead of "It's a-me, Mario!").

Other references made on the show are listed as follows:

  • In the pilot episode "The Early Reel", Carrie's design heavily resembles a Boo.
  • In "The Third", when Tobias is changing colors, the sounds from Donkey Kong can be heard.
  • In "The Blame", during the video game montage, one part of the scenery references the Super Mario series.
  • In "The Fury", the anime flashback has Nicole fighting an opponent who resembles Bowser in his Rookie mask from Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga in a tournament.
  • In "The Shippening", when the Hamburger Cop looks inside the back of the Van Shopkeeper's van, a Banzai Bill can be seen in there.
  • In "The Drama", when Gumball and Darwin jump off of Dolphin Man to get to the freeway, Darwin says "Sweet Christmas, you totally Yoshi’d that poor guy", directly referencing the ability to jump off Yoshi in Super Mario World, which is often done to gain a second jump while over a pit (usually causing Yoshi to fall in).

Contents

Rachael Leigh Cook was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the daughter of JoAnn, a cooking instructor and weaver, and Thomas H. Cook, a social worker and former stand-up comedian. [1] She is of part-Italian descent. Cook first appeared in a public service announcement for foster care at seven years of age, and began working as a child print model at the age of 10, most notably in nationwide advertisements for Target and appearing on the boxes of Milk-Bone dog biscuits. She attended Clara Barton Open School, Laurel Springs School, and Minneapolis South High School.

Cook began auditioning for acting work at the age of 14. [1] She made her screen debut as an actress in the 1995 film The Baby-Sitters Club. She also played a role in the adventure film Tom and Huck released in December of 1995. In 1996, her modeling agency sent her to star in a short film, 26 Summer Street. In 1997, Cook appeared in a leading role in the film Country Justice as a 15-year-old rape victim who is impregnated by her rapist.

In 1999, Cook starred in her breakout role in the sleeper hit film She's All That, [2] a romantic comedy that so far is the most financially successful film of her career. In 2000 she starred opposite Elijah Wood in the well-received The Bumblebee Flies Anyway. She took the lead role in 2001's Josie and the Pussycats, which turned out to be a box office failure, although it has since become a cult classic.

In 2000, she was the cover girl for the U.S. March/April issue of FHM. She also starred in the music video for New Found Glory's 2000 single "Dressed to Kill" and singer Daniel Powter's "Love You Lately". In 2002, she was ranked No. 26 in Stuff magazine's "102 Sexiest Women in the World". In 2003, she starred in the film 11:14 as Cheri. She also appeared as a main cast member in the 2005 television miniseries Into the West produced by Steven Spielberg.

In 2007, Cook was seen in the big screen adaptation of Nancy Drew. She played the female lead in the independent sports drama The Final Season. She has appeared in numerous episodes of the Seth Green comedies Titan Maximum and Robot Chicken. In 2008, she guest-starred in an episode of the USA Network series Psych as Abigail Lytar. She reprised the role in the following season.

In February 2010, Cook signed on to play the female lead role in Fox TV's comedy pilot Nirvana. [3] She had a role in the Western horror film Vampire, the English-language feature debut of Japanese director Iwai Shunji. [4] In 2012, Cook signed on to play the female lead role in the TNT crime drama series Perception opposite Eric McCormack. She starred in the independent film Broken Kingdom, which was directed by her husband Daniel Gillies. She also appeared in a Funny or Die sketch with Chad Michael Murray. [5] [6]

Cook starred in the Hallmark Channel original film Summer Love in 2016. [7] In the same year, she starred in another Hallmark film, Autumn In the Vineyard, followed by its sequel Summer in the Vineyard in 2017. [8] 2017 also saw Cook develop, star and executive produce the Hallmark Channel film Frozen in Love, which was broadcast in January 2018 as part of the channel's 'Winterfest' season of programming. [9] [10]

Cook provided the voice for Chelsea Cunningham on the Kids' WB animated series Batman Beyond and in the animated film Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker. Cook voiced Tifa Lockhart in the video games Kingdom Hearts II, Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII and Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy, as well as the CG movie Final Fantasy VII Advent Children. In 2011, she voiced the character of Jaesa Willsaam in the MMO game, Star Wars: The Old Republic. Cook's latest voice-over role is for the video game Yakuza in which she voices the role of Reina. In 2020 Cook appeared in the fifteenth season of Criminal Minds playing the role of Max in the final episodes of the series. [11]

Cook owns her own production company, Ben's Sister Productions (in reference to her younger brother Ben Cook, an aspiring filmmaker). She produced and starred in the film Love, Guaranteed which debuted on Netflix on September 3, 2020. [12]

Cook first gained national attention in 1997, when she was featured in the famous This Is Your Brain on Drugs PSA television advertisement, in which she proceeds to destroy a kitchen with a frying pan.

In 2011, she was selected by the Obama administration as a Champion of Change for Arts Education. [13]

In June 2012, she began to award a small scholarship to students between ages 14 and 19. The scholarship helps pay for career classes, mentoring programs, and other school fees. [1]

In 2017, Rachael Leigh Cook reprised her "This Is Your Brain on Drugs" role twenty years later for a PSA by the Drug Policy Alliance critiquing the War on Drugs and its contribution to mass incarceration, structural racism and poverty. The ad was posted to YouTube on April 20, 2017 in recognition of 4/20. [14]

Cook married actor Daniel Gillies on August 8, 2004, [15] whom she dated since 2001. [16] They have two children: a daughter born September 2013 [17] and a son born April 2015. [18] The couple announced their separation in June 2019, [19] and Gillies filed for divorce a year later. [20] Their divorce was finalized on March 10, 2021. [21]


At the Movies Bill Murray, a black sheep now in 'Stripes.'

A week ago, ''Stripes,'' the movie about 'ɺ man who wanted to keep the world safe for democracy . and meet girls,'' opened in New York. ''Stripes'' stars Bill Murray, who says his achievements make his mother happy ''not because I'm successful, but because I didn't turn out to be a complete wastrel. I was the fifth of nine children, the black sheep of the family. We had no money, and my mother pressured us to pick up occupations. She wanted a plumber, she wanted a dentist, a doctor, a priest, a nun, a carpenter. She wanted one of everything to do all those things we kept getting bills for.''

Black sheep or not, Mr. Murray had a mystical streak - ''When I was little, and alone, I used to sing songs to God'' - and a dangerous tendency toward humanitarianism. He wanted to become a doctor. But if heɽ succeeded, the world would never have had the gift of those sleezy saloon singers and make-out artists whose skins he inhabited on the old ''Saturday Night Live'' television show.

As it turned out, he says, ''There was a lot of studying involved in being a doctor. Besides, most of the people in med school are no fun.''

Mr. Murray's show business career started with Chicago's Second City improvisational theater, and in 1975, he decided to try his luck in New York. His brother, Brian Doyle-Murray, was already here working on the ''National Lampoon Radio Hour.'' ''I moved into Brian's apartment. Two days later, I had a job on the 'Lampoon Radio Hour.➯ter three months, Brian said, 'Get out, Bill.' So I sublet a place from a girl who hadn't paid her gas or electric bill in eight years. She told me Gene Hackman had lived in this building. There were millions of cockroaches, but I thought, 'Well, Gene put up with it, I can put up with it.'''

An Off Broadway version of the Lampoon show led first to employment on Howard Cosell's ''Saturday Night Live'' (a television variety show featuring animal acts and little kids with loud voices) and then to employment on the later Lorne Michaels and NBC ''Saturday Night Live.''

Now that he's a movie star, Mr. Murray is enjoying the ride. But he isn't sure where he wants to get off. ''I'm only 30,'' he says. 'ɿor 20 years, I had no ambition to do anything, and then I got a job, sort of accidentally, and then another job, and another. But I don't think I want to be Charlton Heston. I don't want to be doing movies when I'm 50 years old.''

Today, the actor lives in New York, in a loft ''which was nice for about five months. Then they put a restaurant in downstairs, so now meat trucks come all day long, and it's noisy, and the sidewalk is slippery. I've got a moose head on the wall. The biggest moose head I've ever seen. It's a sobering thought that something that big can die. Like when Elvis died, I thought, if Elvis can die, what is going to become of me?''

Moved profoundly by Elvis Presley's death, Mr. Murray went to the funeral. ''There were little white plastic signs all along the route of the procession that said, ɾlvis, we love you.' The driver drove the hearse so slowly it was barely moving. There were these beautiful trees, and Elvis's presence was everywhere. At the cemetery, I remembered dropping down on my knees and crying. Afterward, I went back to Graceland, and right across the street, this car rolled up, really low to the ground, bad muffler, incredibly messy. And a guy leans out and says, 'Is there a reception?'

''It was so ridiculous, and so touching.'' Ridiculous and touching are words that might also describe the characters Mr. Murray plays. Of ''Stripes,'' he says he worked ''more efficiently than I ever worked before. The hard part with movies is to sit around and wait and still have yourself right there when you're needed for those three minutes a day they actually film. I really tried to keep control of myself for this one.''

During the shooting of ''Stripes,'' Mr. Murray married Mickey Kelly. ''She's a girl from home. We got married twice, once on Super Bowl Sunday and then again back home, so we could throw a big party. We did the whole thing. Church, priest, reception. All those Irish people drinking heavily. It was great.''

The second ceremony took place on March 25. On March 24, it had been 30 degrees in Chicago. On March 25, it was 75, and the sun shone. A friend thinks he knows the reason: ''It was all those songs you sang to God.''

Blake Edwards's ''S.O.B.'' has been called by some critics a bitter indictment of the way talent is savaged by the folks who run movie studios. Mr. Edwards, who wrote, produced and directed the picture, says he doesn't think it is all that bitter - ''There's a lot of humor in it'' - and since he's a third generation film maker (his grandfather directed silents, his father was in the business, too), he knows whereof he mocks.

He doesn't deny that ''S.O.B.'' is, loosely speaking, autobiographical. ''I'm in there,'' he says. '⟾lix is partly me. Making the gigantic flops. I didn't go crazy, the way he did, but I was pretty desperate.''

After producing a lemon called ''Night Wind,'' Felix, Mr. Edwards's protagonist in ''S.O.B.,'' tries to kill himself. After his huge Paramount flop, '⟚rling Lili,'' and the failure of two subsequent pictures at M-G-M. (''Wild Rovers'' and ''The Carey Treatment'') Mr. Edwards moved to Europe, preferring a haven in Switzerland to one in Forest Lawn.

''Sally Miles is partly Julie, too,'' Mr. Edwards says, referring to Julie Andrews, his wife, and one of the stars of ''S.O.B.,'' ''in the sense that Sally has that kind of pure image. The difference is that Sally is comfortable with it, and Julie never has been. And Sally is a bitch, and Julie is not. But when Sally gets full of dope, and comes out singing, and molests the cameraman, that good old gal is Julie.''

There is nothing in the picture, says Mr. Edwards, that isn't based on truth. ''There's exaggeration. There are composites. But I know the publicist. He exists. I know the head of the studio who got dressed up in drag. I know the doctor. As for the orgies, people out there say they're too busy working to have orgies. They're not too busy.

''I wrote the script 10 years ago. It was turned down by everybody. Finally a man named David Picker, with Lorimar, did it. Then he made a deal with Paramount to distribute. When I heard that, I screamed. I said, ɻut I wrote it about Paramount!' ''

During the time he was trying to get backing for ''S.O.B.,'' Mr. Edwards managed to turn out three ''Pink Panther'' sequels, and '✐.'' These four pictures cost less than $30 million and grossed over $300 million, a vindication of his talent that must have been satisfying. But he observes that for eight years he couldn't get '✐'' shot either. ''Nobody wanted to do a story about a wealthy, successful semi-bachelor who drives a Rolls-Royce and makes a fool of himself. In those days, they weren't interested in women's lib, or male menopause, or fidelity, things implicit in that script. But I was lucky. By the time it was done, those subjects were current, and people could relate to them.''

Mr. Edwards says the romantic notion that the old movie tycoons loved and understood movies, while the new breed, the so-called '𧫌ountants,'' are responsibile for the dearth of present-day art, is banana oil.

''It's like saying Al Capone was better than the Mafia is now. It's still organized crime and it's still lethal. The moguls who used to run the movie business got into it because of the money. They were nickelodeon operators, they were cloak-and-suiters, and they saw an opportunity to make a buck. Film gave them stature. That's what they loved about it. They were killers. They destroyed members of their own families. But they were smart enough to hire talented people. Theyɽ say, 'Get me F. Scott Fitzgerald.' The only difference between then and now is that things weren't run by committee then. Those men were bosses. They had ultimate power. You could get an answer from them. Most of the time it was 'No,' but you could get an answer.''

Just before Mr. Edwards flew to the States to plug ''S.O.B.,'' he wrapped up ''Victor/Victoria,'' another picture starring Miss Andrews. He says it was fun, and that life in general is fine these days. His daughter, Jennifer, plays a role in ''S.O.B.,'' his son works in the cutting room, Miss Andrews's daughter, Emma Walton, now 16, has come to New York to be an actress, and the Edwardses have adopted two Vietnamese children. The little girls are 6 and 7, and sometimes strangers are nonplussed by the situation. An English reporter, once she realized the children were Asian, was hard put to find something nice to say. Finally she managed, ''Oh, that's very fashionable, isn't it?'' ''Well,'' says Mr. Edwards thoughtfully, ''It wasn't really fashionable until we napalmed all their families.''

Glenda Jackson's performance in ''Stevie,'' called ''the best performance by an actress to be seen in any film released so far this year,'' by Vincent Canby, can be seen beginning July 9 at the 68th Street Playhouse. The film, an adaptation of Hugh Whitemore's play about the English poet Stevie Smith, had a three-day run last month at the Thalia. Now it will have an indefinite run at the 68th Street Playhouse, on Third Avenue. The Harold Clurman Theater has been showing a series of rock-and-roll movies that will continue through July 14. Tonight and tomorrow, you can see Jimi Hendrix in the 1970 ''Jimi Plays Berkeley'' and on Sunday, Bruce Springsteen and Jackson Browne appear in the 1980 ''No Nukes.''. Down at the Eighth Street Playhouse, the second Annual 3-D Festival is in full swing with 3-D prints of movies like ''Kiss Me Kate'' and 'ɼreature From The Black Lagoon.''


Contents

Silver series Edit

Gold series Edit

February 21, 1981 > 1,000,000

Wide Screen series Edit

Mysteries of the Sea (UK)

Mysteries of the Deep (UK)

Vertical Multi Screen series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Oil Panic May 28, 1982 250,000 — 1,000,000 OP-51
Donkey Kong June 3, 1982 250,000 — 1,000,000 DK-52
Mickey & Donald November 12, 1982 250,000 — 1,000,000 DM-53
Green House December 16, 1982 250,000 — 1,000,000 GH-54
Donkey Kong II March 7, 1983 250,000 — 1,000,000 JR-55
Pinball December 5, 1983 < 250,000 PB-59
Black Jack February 15, 1985 < 250,000 BJ-60
Squish April 17, 1986 < 250,000 MG-61
Bomb Sweeper June 15, 1987 < 250,000 BD-62
Safebuster January 12, 1988 > 1,000,000 JB-63
Gold Cliff October 19, 1988 < 250,000 MV-64
Zelda August 26, 1989 < 250,000 ZL-65

Horizontal Multi Screen series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Mario Bros. March 14, 1983 250,000 — 1,000,000 MW-56
Rain Shower August 10, 1983 < 250,000 LP-57
Lifeboat October 25, 1983 > 1,000,000 TC-58

New Wide Screen series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Donkey Kong Jr. October 26, 1982 250,000 — 1,000,000 DJ-101
Mario's Cement Factory June 16, 1983 > 1,000,000 ML-102
Manhole August 24, 1983 < 250,000 NH-103
Tropical Fish July 8, 1985 < 250,000 TF-104
Super Mario Bros. March 8, 1988 250,000 — 1,000,000 YM-105
Climber March 8, 1988 < 250,000 DR-106
Balloon Fight March 8, 1988 < 250,000 BF-107
Mario the Juggler October 14, 1991 < 250,000 MB-108

Table Top series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Donkey Kong Jr. April 28, 1983 < 250,000 CJ-71
Mario's Cement Factory April 28, 1983 < 250,000 CM-72
Snoopy July 5, 1983 < 250,000 SM-73
Popeye August 17, 1983 < 250,000 PG-74

Panorama series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Snoopy August 30, 1983 < 250,000 SM-91
Popeye August 30, 1983 < 250,000 PG-92
Donkey Kong Jr. October 7, 1983 < 250,000 CJ-93
Mario's Bombs Away November 13, 1983 < 250,000 TB-94
Mickey Mouse February 28, 1984 < 250,000 DC-95
Donkey Kong Circus September 6, 1984 < 250,000 MK-96

Super Color series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Spitball Sparky February 7, 1984 < 250,000 BU-201
Crab Grab February 21, 1984 < 250,000 UD-202

Micro Vs. series Edit

Crystal Screen series Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Super Mario Bros. June 25, 1986 < 250,000 YM-801
Climber July 4, 1986 < 250,000 DR-802
Balloon Fight November 19, 1986 < 250,000 BF-803

Untitled special models Edit

Title Release Sales Model Image
Super Mario Bros. August 1, 1987 10,000 YM-901-S
Ball (reissue) April 1, 2010 . RGW-001
Super Mario Bros. 35th Anniversary Edition November 13, 2020 . SM-35

Ball Edit

Ball (originally known as Toss-Up in North America) is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Silver series on April 28, 1980. It was the first Game & Watch game. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

In Game A, the player tosses two balls in the air. As the balls fall, the player must catch and toss them up again. One point is earned for each successful catch. A dropped ball will display a broken ball and end the game. The object is to continuously catch the balls that fall and throw them back up, as in juggling. In Game B, the player must juggle three balls, and each successful catch rewards ten points instead of one.

It was re-released exclusively via Club Nintendo to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Game & Watch, with the Club Nintendo logo on the back. Unlike the original release, this version includes an option to mute the game by pressing the Time button during gameplay. [1] For members of the Japanese Club Nintendo, after an announcement in November 2009, it was shipped in April 2010 to Platinum members. [2] [3] [4] For members of the North American Club Nintendo, it was available for 1200 coins from February 2011. [5] [6] For members of the European Club Nintendo, it was available for 7500 stars from November 2011. [7] [8]

Ball was recreated in Game Boy Gallery and Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on July 15, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on April 19, 2010 in the United States [11] and April 23, 2010 in Europe [12] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [12] It also appears as a minigame for the Game Boy Camera, where players can paste images of their own face over that of the juggler.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch's throws reference Ball.

Flagman Edit

Flagman (originally known as Flag Man in North America) is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Silver series on June 5, 1980. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The object is to repeat the pattern of numbers on the flags held up by the on-screen character Mr. Game & Watch. A life is lost each time the player pushes the wrong button or hits the correct number too late. The game ends when three lives are lost. Game B requires the character to push the right number as quickly as possible, before time runs out.

Flagman was recreated in Game Boy Gallery and Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color. A version of Flagman becomes available in Wario Land II once the player has achieved 100% completion of the game. It is included in WarioWare: Touched! as a microgame called Flagman Game & Watch. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on July 15, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on April 19, 2010 in the United States [13] and April 23, 2010 in Europe [14] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [14]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a flag, referencing Flagman.

Vermin Edit

Vermin (originally known as The Exterminator in North America) is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Silver series on July 10, 1980 and sold 500,000 units throughout its lifetime. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

In Vermin, moles pop out of the ground and try to get into the player's garden. The player has to hit the moles with a hammer to keep them out of the garden.

Vermin was recreated in Game Boy Gallery and Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color. In WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$!, there is a microgame called "Vermin" in which Wario has to whack a mole with a hammer. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on July 15, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on April 5, 2010 in the United States [15] and April 9, 2010 in Europe [16] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [16]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has several attacks which has him hit opponents on either side with two hammers, referencing Vermin.

Fire Edit

Fire (originally known as Fireman Fireman in North America) is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Silver series on July 31, 1980, and as a part of the Wide Screen series on December 4, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player controls two firemen who carry a trampoline and must catch people who fall from a burning building and bounce them into a waiting ambulance. In the original Silver series, the player is awarded 1 point for each person who reaches the ambulances, while in the Widescreen, the player is awarded 1 point every time a person is bounced the trampoline, and loses one of their three lives for each person who hits the ground.

Fire was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has a move called "Fire", which has two firemen launch him upwards with a trampoline, referencing Fire. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, he then floats down with a parachute, referencing Parachute. [17] In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the stage Flat Zone 2 shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Fire. [18] In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Fire. [19]

Judge Edit

Judge is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Silver series on October 4, 1980. It is a single-screen Game & Watch for either 1 or 2 players.

Players control two figures who hold hammers in their hands and hold up numbers. The one with the higher number must attack, and the one with the lower number must flee. An attack may be performed before the number is held up, as a gamble.

Judge was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released on July 15, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on March 22, 2010 in the United States [20] and on March 26, 2010 in Europe [21] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [21]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has a move called "Judge", which has him hit opponents with a hammer that has an additional effect dependent on a random number from 1 to 9 that appears above his head, referencing Judge. [17]

Manhole Edit

Manhole is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Gold series on January 29, 1981, and as a part of the New Wide Screen series on August 24, 1983. It is the first game in the Gold series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player must prevent pedestrians from falling into one of four sewers by temporarily bridging the open gaps with a manhole cover.

The New Wide Screen version of Manhole was recreated in Game Boy Gallery and Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. This version of Manhole was one of the cards included with purchase of the Nintendo e-Reader. [22] The New Wide Screen version of Manhole was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released on August 19, 2009 in Japan, [10] on April 5, 2010 in the United States [23] and April 9, 2010 in Europe [24] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [24]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a manhole cover, referencing Manhole. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, the stage Flat Zone is based on a number of Game & Watch games, including Manhole. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the stage Flat Zone 2 shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Manhole. [18] In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Manhole. [19]

Helmet Edit

Helmet, known as Headache in the United Kingdom, is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Gold series on February 21, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

Tools fall from the sky, but there is a house on the right side of the screen. The player must guide the character towards the house, and dodge the tools until the door opens.

Helmet was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on July 29, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on April 5, 2010 in the United States [25] and April 9, 2010 in Europe [26] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [26]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a helmet, referencing Helmet. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, the stage Flat Zone is based on a number of Game & Watch games, including Helmet. In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Helmet. [19]

Lion Edit

Lion is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Gold series on April 29, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch with a maroon body and a gold faceplate.

The player is a lion tamer who must prevent the lion from escaping from its cage.

Lion was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a chair, referencing Lion. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the stage Flat Zone 2 shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Lion. [18] In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Lion. [19]

Parachute Edit

Parachute is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on June 19, 1981. It was the first game in the Wide Screen series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player controls a character in a boat and has to prevent parachutists from landing in shark-infested waters. A life is lost every time the player fails to do this. In Game B, the parachutes can get stuck in trees.

Parachute was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color, Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance and Game & Watch Collection 2 for the Nintendo DS (a Club Nintendo-exclusive).

In Super Smash Bros. Melee, Mr. Game & Watch’s neutral air has him opens a parachute, referencing Parachute. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl onward, after performing "Fire" in the same way as in Super Smash Bros. Melee, he then floats down with a parachute, referencing Parachute. [17]

In March 2010, Takara Tomy released officially licensed Game & Watch-styled keychains based on three different Wide Screen Game & Watch models, one of which was Parachute. It does not actually run the game, instead just displaying a demo screen. While the game cannot be played, the speed at which the demo runs can be adjusted. The batteries are recharged with solar panels on the unit. [27]

Octopus Edit

Octopus, known as Mysteries of the Sea and Mysteries of the Deep in the United Kingdom, is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on July 16, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The object is to recover treasure from a sunken ship without getting caught by an octopus. The player must aim his diver under water by jumping off the side of a boat. Each time the octopus touches the player, one life is lost. A point is awarded for each portion of treasure retrieved from a sunken ship, and three additional points are awarded for evading the octopus a second time and returning to the boat. The game speeds as it progresses, and additional lives are granted at 200 and 500 points. In Game B, the octopus is quicker and there are more hazards.

Octopus was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance and Game & Watch Collection 2 for the Nintendo DS (a Club Nintendo-exclusive). It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch up smash has him hit opponents with a diving helmet, referencing Octopus. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Mr. Game & Watch's Final Smash is "Octopus", which has him transform into the octopus and hit opponents with his tentacles, referencing Octopus while in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate he instead grabs the opponents and drags them offscreen. In Nintendo Land, the octopus and the diver appear in the Octopus Dance minigame.

In March 2010, Takara Tomy released officially licensed Game & Watch-styled keychains based on three different Wide Screen Game & Watch models, one of which was Octopus. It does not actually run the game, instead just displaying a demo screen. While the game cannot be played, the speed at which the demo runs can be adjusted. The batteries are recharged with solar panels on the unit. [27]

Popeye Edit

Popeye is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on August 5, 1981, as a part of the Table Top series on August 17, 1983, and as a part of the Panorama series on August 30, 1983. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

The player controls Popeye, who has to catch objects thrown by Olive Oyl while at the same time avoiding Bluto's attacks. If Popeye is upright in the center of the boat, he's safe from Bluto's attacks, but he may miss objects thrown by Olive Oyl. The game speeds up as it progresses, and Olive Oyl will start throwing more than one objects at the same time.

The Panorama Screen and the Table Top versions are different from the Wide Screen version. In these versions, Popeye must fight to save Olive Oyl, who has been captured by Bluto. Each time Popeye defeats Bluto, a Spinach Can will appear near Olive Oyl. After three fights, She kicks the can to Popeye to help him defeat Bluto, and save her.

Chef Edit

Chef is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on September 8, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player controls a chef who flips various pieces of food, including sausage and fish, into the air with a pan. Failure to keep the food airborne causes a mouse to steal the food off the floor and the player to use up one miss. The game ends with the player's third miss. A cat often pokes the left piece of food, which holds it in place for a small amount of time and makes it harder for the player to guess when the piece will be flippable. The game speeds up as it progresses. In Game A, the player must flip three items of food. In Game B, the player must flip four food items.

Chef was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. Chef is unlockable in Personal Trainer: Cooking for the Nintendo DS after the player has cooked a certain number of meals. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released on July 29, 2009 in Japan, [9] [10] on March 22, 2010 in the United States, [29] and March 26, 2010 in Europe [30] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [30]

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has a move called "Chef", which has him flip food out of pan, referencing Chef. [17] In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the stage Flat Zone 2 shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Chef. [18] In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Chef. [19]

In March 2010, Takara Tomy released officially licensed Game & Watch-styled keychains based on three different Wide Screen Game & Watch models, one of which was Chef. It does not actually run the game, instead just displaying a demo screen. While the game cannot be played, the speed at which the demo runs can be adjusted. The batteries are recharged with solar panels on the unit. [27]

Mickey Mouse Edit

Mickey Mouse is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on October 9, 1981, and as a part of the Panorama series on February 28, 1984. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

In the Wide Screen version, the player controls Mickey Mouse whose task it is to catch eggs as they roll down four slopes, two on either side of the screen. If an egg is dropped it lands on the floor releasing a chick who walks away off screen. The eggs fall ever more quickly as the total caught closes in on multiples of 100. In GAME A the misses are reset every 100 caught eggs. In GAME B the number and rate of descent of eggs is increased with misses only being reset at multiples of 500. Missing three eggs between resets will end the game. Periodically, Minnie Mouse peers out of the window if Mickey misses an egg while Minnie is present onscreen, the miss counts as half. The gameplay is similar to Egg.

The Panorama version of the game is completely different. In this game, the player controls Mickey Mouse, who is performing acrobatics in a circus. The player must move Mickey left and right to catch batons, whilst avoiding flaming torches. The speed the objects fall increases upon the total score closing in on multiples of 100. If the player misses a baton or touches a flaming torch, a life is lost. After three lives are lost, the game ends. Once the player reaches 300 points, all misses are cancelled. If the player has no misses, they will receive double points until the next miss. The gameplay is similar to Donkey Kong Circus.

Egg Edit

Egg is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on October 9, 1981. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player character is a fox who waits outside a hen house. The fox must catch the eggs that fall out of the side of the hen house, for one point each. Three lives are given. A life is lost for each egg missed, or half of a life if the egg is missed while a hen appears. The game ends when all three lives are lost. The gameplay is similar to Mickey Mouse (Wide Screen).

Egg was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color.

Turtle Bridge Edit

Turtle Bridge is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on February 1, 1982. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player uses a line of five turtles as stepping stones to transfer baggage from one side of a river to the other. Once a package is tossed to a colleague on the other side, the player can return to the home bank to fetch the next package. The turtles are not motionless but will dive to feed on any fish within reach, and they dive more frequently as the game progresses. The player may need to wait for the colleague on the far bank and cannot return to the home bank while carrying a package. Two to ten points are awarded, depending on how quickly the package is delivered. It takes approximately 1 hour of game play to accrue 1000 points. Unlike other similar games, the scoreboard can display scores past 1000. Lives are lost if the explorer lands on a turtle that dives. A life can be recovered at the score levels 200 and 500. The game ends when all lives are lost.

In Game A, the middle turtle of the five has no fish swimming in reach and never dives unless the explorer waits too long on its back, at which point fish appear and the turtle dives. In Game B, all turtles will dive from the outset, while the colleague appears less frequently.

Turtle Bridge was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch back air has him hit opponents with a turtle, referencing Turtle Bridge.

Fire Attack Edit

Fire Attack is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on March 26, 1982. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The main character uses a tomahawk-type weapon to protect a fort from burning. The top row of enemies are Indian chiefs who throw firesticks, and the bottom row of enemies are traditional Game & Watch characters who try to set fire to the fort with a match. Two points are earned for each fire blocked. Three misses are allowed, which occur each time the fort catches fire. All misses are erased at 200 points and again at 500 if there aren't any misses at these times, 5 points are awarded per hit for a period of time.

Fire Attack was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance, although, the Game Boy Advance version of the "Legacy Mode" was censored, due to outdated stereotypes, being turned into generic "Bandits".

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a fire stick, referencing Fire Attack. In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Mr. Game & Watch's animations were updated to reflect individual frames from the original games, including gaining a feathered headband when using the move based on Fire Attack. The controversy following this discovery prompted Nintendo to apologize for the potentially offensive stereotype and announce that the animation would be changed in a post-release patch.

Snoopy Tennis Edit

Snoopy Tennis is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Wide Screen series on April 28, 1982.

Charlie Brown throws and hits a ball toward Snoopy, who must hit the ball back. Lucy sometimes will hit the ball to Snoopy.

It was rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

Oil Panic Edit

Oil Panic is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on May 28, 1982. It was the first game in the Multi Screen series. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a white case. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

The player controls a station helper who uses a bucket to catch drops of oil from a leaking pipe and empties the bucket into an oil drum. Missing a drop from the pipe or missing the oil drum causes the player to lose a life. The player has four lives, rather than the usual three.

Oil Panic was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Collection for the Nintendo DS (a Club Nintendo-exclusive). Oil Panic is also one of the microgames featured in the collection presented by 9 Volt in WarioWare: Touched!. In Europe, it was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has a move called "Oil Panic", which has him collect energy-based attacks in an oil bucket to throw at opponents as oil later, referencing Oil Panic. [17] In Super Smash Bros. Melee, the stage Flat Zone is based on a number of Game & Watch games, including Manhole. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the stage Flat Zone 2 shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Oil Panic. [18] In Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, the stage Flat Zone X shifts between several layouts, one of which is based on Oil Panic. [19]

Donkey Kong Edit

Donkey Kong is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on June 3, 1982. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with an orange body. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen. This game was also the first use of the directional pad.

Donkey Kong was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Collection for the Nintendo DS (a Club Nintendo-exclusive). It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

Donkey Kong Jr. Edit

Donkey Kong Jr. is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the New Wide Screen series on October 26, 1982, as a part of the Table Top series on April 28, 1983, as a part of the Panorama series on October 7, 1983. It was the first game in the New Wide Screen series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

Donkey Kong Jr. was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on August 19, 2009 in Japan, [10] on April 19, 2010 in the United States [31] and April 23, 2010 in Europe [32] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [32] It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a key, referencing Donkey Kong Jr..

Mickey & Donald Edit

Mickey & Donald is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on November 12, 1982. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

The goal is put out the fire in a three-story apartment building as quickly as possible. Donald operates the hose, while Mickey runs the pump. Bulges in the hose give more water for Donald to use, but require Mickey to leave the pump to stop leaks.

Green House Edit

Green House is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on December 6, 1982 [ citation needed ] . It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

The object is to protect the flowers at each corner of the screen from enemies using a can of bug spray. Worms attack the top flowers while spiders approach the bottom flowers. The game ends when three flowers have been eaten.

Green House was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Collection for the Nintendo DS (a Club Nintendo-exclusive).

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him spray opponents with a can of bug spray, referencing Green House.

This is considered by some retro gamers to be the first appearance of Stanley the Bugman, the lead character in the 1983 arcade game Donkey Kong 3. In that title, the character defends his greenhouse from Donkey Kong and insects using a can of bug spray. The character artwork between the two games is also similar in design.

Donkey Kong II Edit

Donkey Kong II is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on March 7, 1983. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a brown body. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

Donkey Kong II was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color.

Mario Bros. Edit

Mario Bros. is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on March 14, 1983. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a maroon body. It opens like a Japanese book (to the right), with a left and right screen.

Mario and Luigi are working in a bottling plant, on either side of several stacked conveyor belts. The object of the game is to move boxes of bottles through the machine without dropping any. Each brother can climb a ladder to one of three positions. Mario receives a box at the bottom right, and must be in his lowest position to move it into the bottling machine. The box moves left through the machine, to Luigi, who must be in his lowest position to move it to the next level, which moves it to the right, to Mario's middle position, who raises it to the next level. The box moves to Luigi's middle position, then to Mario's highest position, and finally to Luigi's highest position, where Luigi throws the box onto a truck. When the truck is full, the Brothers have a short break, before getting back to work. Successfully moving a box up one level earns the player 1 point, and loading the truck with eight boxes earns 10 points, for a total of 58 points for all the boxes in the truck. However, if a Brother isn't there to catch a box, it falls to the floor and breaks, angering the Brothers' supervisor, resulting in a miss. The third miss ends the game.

Mario Bros. was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy, Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color, and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

In the Super Smash Bros. series up until Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Mr. Game & Watch's forward air has him hit opponents with a package, referencing Mario Bros. One of his taunts from Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U onwards also references the game where he sits and sighs a reference to when Mario and Luigi complete a level.

Mario's Cement Factory Edit

Mario's Cement Factory is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Table Top series on April 28, 1983 and as a part of the New Wide Screen series on June 16, 1983. It was the first game in the Table Top series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game sounds. [28]

Mario's Cement Factory was recreated in Game Boy Gallery and Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. It was recreated as a DSiWare game that was released for Nintendo DSi on August 19, 2009 in Japan, [10] on March 22, 2010 in the United States, [33] and March 26, 2010 in Europe [34] and for Nintendo 3DS on July 7, 2011 in Europe. [34] It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch grabs opponents with a similar pose to how Mario grabs levers, referencing Mario's Cement Factory.

Snoopy Edit

Snoopy is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Table Top series on June 5, 1983, and as a part of the Panorama series on August 30, 1983. It was the first game in the Panorama series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

When Game A or Game B is pressed, an introductory sequence plays, and after that, the player controls Snoopy to move on different colored platforms. He then must whack the corresponding colored music notes coming from Schroeder's piano before they reach Woodstock and his friends. Failing to whack them in time or going too far to the left or right will make the player earn a miss. After 100 points, Lucy will wake up and attack Schroeder, stunning him for a few seconds.

Rain Shower Edit

Rain Shower is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on August 10, 1983. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a book, with a left and right screen.

The player moves clothing away from falling raindrops by pulling on a clothes line. In Game B, a bird may swoop down and move the clothing.

Rain Shower was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Lifeboat Edit

Lifeboat is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on October 25, 1983. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a light orange case. It opens like a book, with a left and right screen.

A burning oceanliner is displayed, and the player pulls a raft through shark-infested waters to catch the people who fall from the ship. The rafts can hold up to 4 people, and can be emptied no matter how many people are in them. A point is awarded for each rescue. The alarm on is indicated by a bucket of water on the cliffside, and when it goes off, a man uses the bucket to attempt to douse the fire.

Game A mode controls two rafts, one on each side of the screen, which move together when the left and right buttons are pressed. In Game B there is only one raft, which can move from one side of the screen to the other.

Lifeboat was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Mario's Bombs Away Edit

Mario's Bombs Away is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Panorama series on November 13, 1983. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. It features an unlit color LCD screen that faces downward in order to expose the translucent rear to an external light source, such as daylight. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

The player character is a military-clad Mario who delivers bombs from left to right, and must keep them away from flaming oil spills and enemy torches. Action is viewed in a mirror that reflects the screen.

Mario's Bombs Away was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Pinball Edit

Pinball is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on December 5, 1983. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

The player controls two flippers on the bottom screen and two on the top screen. Other pinball objects include bumpers, outlanes, rollover lanes, kickbacks and plungers.

Spitball Sparky Edit

Spitball Sparky is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Super Color series on February 7, 1984. It was the first game in the Super Color series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch. Hirokazu Tanaka composed the game music. [28]

Spitball Sparky works similarly to Breakout, where a ball moves across the screen and is propelled by the player, blowing it upwards as long it is directly above the player in the purple space. If all blocks are eliminated fast enough, a bonus bar at the top would add 5 points per segment, the most being 20 points. Along the top row are red blocks, which require two hits to destroy. If the player eliminates all but the red blocks, and then hits each red block once to make them flash, it awards more bonus points.

Spitball Sparky was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 and Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color.

In the Super Smash Bros. series, Mr. Game & Watch’s up air has him blow opponents upwards, referencing Spitball Sparky.

Crab Grab Edit

Crab Grab is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Super Color series on February 21, 1984. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

Crabs emerge from four differently colored columns along the bottom of the screen, and settle at the top. The objective is to avoid being in front of the crab, and to push the crabs from the bottom to prevent them from mounting on the screen. Points are earned by pushing and eliminating crabs. The game ends when the player has been bitten three times. Player movement is in all four directions (Up, Down, Left, Right). The A & B games had similar objectives, but with slightly different speeds.

Boxing Edit

Boxing, known as Punch-Out!! in the United States, is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Micro Vs. series on July 31, 1984. It is the first game in the Micro Vs. series. It is a single-screen two-player Game & Watch.

It is similar to Urban Champion, although it was released shortly before the NES title.

Boxing was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery for Game Boy and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Donkey Kong 3 Edit

Donkey Kong 3 is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Micro Vs. series on August 20, 1984.

Donkey Kong 3 was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Donkey Kong Circus Edit

Donkey Kong Circus is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Panorama series on September 6, 1984. It is a single-screen two-player Game & Watch with a lilac body. The gameplay is similar to Mickey Mouse (Panorama).

Donkey Kong Hockey Edit

Donkey Kong Hockey is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Micro Vs. series on November 13, 1984. It is a single-screen two-player Game & Watch.

Black Jack Edit

Black Jack is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on February 15, 1985. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a maroon body. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

Game A is a blackjack game. The dealer's hand is on the upper screen and the player's hand is on the bottom screen. Four buttons are available: double down, bet ×10/hit, bet ×1/stand and enter. The player starts with a $500 bankroll and can bet up to $100 each hand. Pair splitting is not allowed, and bets must be locked before shuffling is done, contrary to real-world blackjack rules.

In Game B, the player starts with $500 as five numbers cycle on the bottom screen. Pressing the enter button causes the numbers to stop one at a time. There is a $50 reward if all five stop on the same number, or a deduction of $25 if not.

Tropical Fish Edit

Tropical Fish is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the New Wide Screen series on July 8, 1985. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The player uses a fishbowl to catch fish that jump out of a tank and must move them into a tank on the other side. The game ends when three fish are missed.

Tropical Fish was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 2 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, Mr. Game & Watch has an attack which has him hit opponents with a fish bowl, referencing Tropical Fish.

Squish Edit

Squish is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on April 17, 1986. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

Super Mario Bros. (1986) Edit

Not to be confused with the 2020 Game & Watch release with the same name. (see below)

Super Mario Bros. is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Crystal Screen series on June 25, 1986, and as a part of the New Wide Screen series on March 8, 1988. It was the first game in the Crystal Screen series. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

It was also made available as a prize for winners of the Famicon's F-1 Grand Prix tournament on August 1, 1987 with code YM-901-S. [35] It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch with a yellow case. It came in a plastic box modeled after Disk-kun, the character Nintendo used to advertise the Famicom Disk System. This edition is the rarest of all Game & Watch models, as only 10,000 units of this version were produced and it was never available for retail sale. [36]

Mario has to go through levels to save Princess Toadstool (also known as Peach) similar to the NES game.

Super Mario Bros. was rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics 1998.

Climber Edit

Climber is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Crystal Screen series on July 4, 1986, and as a part of the New Wide Screen series on March 8, 1988. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

A boy known as the Climber sets out for the Block Mountain where the Blockmen live to train as a warrior. Lord Meiji, who he meets on the way, grants him a pair of boots which enable him to jump very high, armor that can break ceilings, and a head band which will help him find a sword that can defeat Dragalo the Dragon. The climber pursues his quest with the assistance of the mysterious bird Hentori. The objective of the game is to control Climber by jumping through a tower of platforms and landing on them, and by avoiding monsters and blockmen. The goal is to either grab Hentori or slash Dragalo while achieving the highest score possible.

Climber was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 3 for Game Boy Color and Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Balloon Fight Edit

Balloon Fight is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Crystal Screen series on November 19, 1986, and as a part of the New Wide Screen series on March 8, 1988. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

Bomb Sweeper Edit

Bomb Sweeper is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on June 15, 1987. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

The player character is John Solver, who must navigate a maze to defuse bombs set by "Jack". When playing on "Game A" mode, the maze begins to move from left to right after a certain number of bombs are defused, and the player must find an exit back to the surface. The top screen is merely cosmetic, and shows the boss who sends the player character into the underground maze. Unlike in most Game & Watch games, lost lives are not reset when a player reaches 300 points.

Bomb Sweeper was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Safebuster Edit

Safebuster is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on January 12, 1988. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

A security guard on the bottom screen uses a tube to catch bombs thrown by a bandit on the top screen. The tube is able to hold three bombs, which can be dumped down a chute at either side of the bottom screen for 1 point each. A life is lost for each bomb missed. The game ends when three lives are lost.

Safebuster was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance.

Gold Cliff Edit

Gold Cliff is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on October 19, 1988. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch with a light blue case and colorful printed metal plate on the cover. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

The player controls an Indiana Jones-type archaeologist character who is on a mission to acquire treasure. Stone platforms appear and disappear in a pattern, and the player must jump across them to reach a key at the top of the screen and gain entry to the temple. Action speeds as the game continues. It was one of only two Game & Watch games that included a "continue" feature, which allowed a player to continue the game, with a loss of points, from the last place where they were killed.

Zelda Edit

Zelda is a Game & Watch game released as a part of the Multi Screen series on August 26, 1989. It is a dual-screen single-player Game & Watch. It opens like a compact, with an upper and lower screen.

Zelda was recreated in Game & Watch Gallery 4 for Game Boy Advance. It was also rereleased as part of the Nintendo Mini Classics.

Mario the Juggler Edit

Mario the Juggler is the last Game & Watch game released as a part of the New Wide Screen series on October 14, 1991. It is a single-screen single-player Game & Watch.

The gameplay is similar to that of the first Game & Watch game, Ball.

Super Mario Bros. 35th Anniversary Edition Edit

Not to be confused with the 1986 Game & Watch game with the same name.

The limited 35th Anniversary Edition Game & Watch version of Super Mario Bros. is a Game & Watch unit featuring a full-color pixel screen, able to play NES versions of Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, as well as another new Mario-themed variant of Ball (looking very different from Mario the Juggler), and traditional Game & Watch clock features. The size and shape of the hardware is similar to the original Game & Watch Wide Screen series, but with the addition of a cross-shaped d-pad like the one featured in the Donkey Kong Game & Watch. This unit was released on November 13, 2020. [37]


Tropes:

  • Abandoned Area: The most common setting of the series.
    • Abandoned Mine: There's one in the episode "Mine Your Own Business".
    • Ghost Town: Gold City, also from "Mine Your Own Business".
    • Haunted Castle: The primary location in "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts" and "Hassle in the Castle" naturally.
    • Haunted House: Of course! Standout examples include "A Night of Fright is No Delight", "What the Hex Going On", and "Haunted House Hang-Up".
    • In "Go Away, Ghost Ship", Scooby is able to handle dry ice without gloves without hurting himself.
    • "Haunted House Hang-Up" shows us the gang covering the Headless Specter in natural gas. You can't see natural gas. That's why it's a gas.
    • In "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts", Daphne finds an inscription about King Tut written in 1668. Tutankhamun's tomb wasn't discovered until the early 20th century, and he wasn't famous prior to that.
    • In-Universe, Velma notes the inconsistency of a Native American witch doctor (predating a good thousand years) speaking modern English.
    • Speaking of the Native American "witch doctor" episode, totem poles and full-body leather garments are as out-of-place in a Southwestern pueblo cliff-dwelling as bagpipes and matador costumes in a Dutch windmill.
    • Although it's possible that he merely had a painting commissioned of himself in a Confederate uniform, Colonel Beauregard Sanders is implied to have been a Confederate officer because of the Worthless Treasure Twist. This is impossible because the last confirmed Confederate veteran died in 1951. The last person who claimed to be a Confederate veteran died in 1959, a full ten years before the episode aired.
    • In the episode "Jeepers, It's the Creeper," a baby chick labors under the delusion that it is a dog after imprinting on Scooby.
    • The episode "Never Ape an Ape Man" also has the Ape Man disguise himself with a Scooby-Doo mask to put on a Mirror Routine with the real Scooby.
    • The opening credits, every time.
    • It also happens when the gang encounters some bats in "Decoy for a Dognapper."
    • The show plays this trope straight constantly during its early incarnations, although they begin playing with it in later series and spinoffs. In the original series, the one character the gang briefly meets early on in each episode disappears and is never seen again. Until the monster is captured. He usually tries to make himself extremely helpful during the brief time he's seen, which is another hint. However, as shown below, there were exceptions.
    • This trope was already subverted in the third episode ever to air, 'A Clue for Scooby Doo.' When pulling off the mask, they assume it's the helpful Mr. Shark pretending to be Captain Cutler's ghost, but instead it's the actual Captain Cutler, whom they'd never before met. (Shaggy, Scooby and Velma saw a picture of Cutler on his widow's wall earlier, and it was Shaggy who caught on to who he was.)
    • Subverted in "Spooky Space Kook" where the gang meets a rather creepy-looking farmer who tells them about a ghost haunting a nearby abandoned airfield. They investigate, and find out that the phony ghost is not the farmer, but the farmer's next-door neighbor (who we haven't even seen until now) who was trying to scare the farmer off his land. And the police who show up at the end? The creepy farmer called them himself when he got worried about the Scooby gang's own safety!
    • Double subverted in "The Haunted House Hang-Up", where the kids meet a creepy old man who tells them a creepy story of a haunted house, then disappears. They spend most of the episode trying to catch a headless ghost in said haunted house, only to find out it's the inheritor of the house (a person they've never seen before), trying to keep treasure hunters away until he can recover his grandfather's fortune. The next moment, a masked burglar wearing a bedsheet on his head breaks into the house. They catch him and guess what? He's the guy they met in the beginning.
    • In "Foul Play in Funland", they are alone for the first half without meeting anyone. This one has no disguised villains, just a malfunctioning robot and an inventor trying to repair it, and his sister, who doesn't like robots.
    • After Velma, Fred and Daphne jump on Scooby and Shaggy (mistaking them for the Creeper), the resulting punch-up is obscured by a dust cloud.
    • The climatic chase ends with a Big Hay-Pile of Violence, courtesy of Shaggy, Velma, Fred, Daphne and the Creeper.
    • Averted in "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts" as the (alleged) contents of the refrigerator sound too revolting even for them.
    • In "What the Hex Going On?", Shaggy says "Scooby-Dooby-Doo" instead of Scooby.
    • Fred, Daphne and Velma share a "Zoinks!" in "A Tiki Scare is No Fair".
    • In "Go Away Ghost Ship", the Scooby gang has to chase a ghost pirate. Their employer, Mr. Magnus, has a big, creepy-looking butler who is an obstacle into going to see him. At the end of the episode, when the pirate is unmasked, Shaggy is surprised:
    • In "Nowhere to Hyde", all clues initially point to the housemaid Helga, but in the end it turns out that all those clues were planted by the real villain, who reveals himself when Shaggy and Scooby accidentally find a true clue.
    • The gypsy fortuneteller the gang encounters in "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts" is voiced by June Foray, but then she turns out to be a man named Big Bob Oakley in disguise, voiced by John Stephenson. Averted with Big Bob's Dracula, Frankenstein Monster and Wolfman disguises, where Stephenson provided their voices as well.
    • The Snow Ghost is voiced by Vic Perrin, but his true identity. Mr. Greenway, is voiced by Hal Smith.
    • The Creeper is voiced by John Stephenson, but his true identity, Mr. Carswell, is voiced by Casey Kasem.
    • Shaggy: Zoinks!
    • Velma: Jinkies!
    • Daphne: Jeepers!
    • Scooby: Scooby Dooby Doo!
    • Fred:. Dang, I still don't have a catch phrase!, unless you count "Let's split up, gang!"
      • Fred and Velma were also fond of saying "I got a hunch" in the early episodes.
      • The cops never really arrive until the end.
      • Averted in "A Tiki Scare is No Fair" with an agent in his own mask during the whole episode.
      • In "Mine Your Own Business", Shaggy and Scooby get cups full of them.
      • In "Nowhere to Hyde", the attic has a collection of them.
      • In "What the Hex is Going On?", the old Kingston Mansion has these in the background (corners, connecting furniture to walls).
      • Also present in the Vasquez Castle (notably on the portrait) in "Hassle in the Castle".
      • In "Don't Fool with a Phantom", the last episode of the original Scooby-Doo series, the Wax Phantom (the Monster of the Week) left Shaggy and Scooby tied up on a conveyor belt that would dump them into a tank of melted wax, and Shaggy quipped, "That bit went out with the silent movies!" You know it's a Dead Horse Trope when it's being parodied in the early 1970s.
      • Not that this stopped the Snow Ghost from tying Velma to a log and sending it towards a buzzsaw in "That's Snow Ghost".
      • In "Nowhere to Hyde", Hyde sneaks into the back of the Mystery Machine while the gang eats dinner. He's only discovered when Velma asks Scooby to retrieve the blanket under which he was hiding.
      • Inverted in one episode the gang finds the Creeper in the driver's seat of the Mystery Machine.
      • Danger-Prone Daphne.
      • Velma becomes this in "That's Snow Ghost" when the title monster chains her to a log and sends her towards a buzzsaw.
      • Velma, believe it or not, in "Foul Play in Fun land" after losing her glasses.
      • Fred also briefly resorted to this, including crashing through walls, during the Chase Scene in "Mystery Mask Mix-up."
      • The show originally opened for the first two episodes with an instrumental theme by Ted Nichols, who composed the incidental music for the rest of the show. This theme was only heard in the first two episodes before being replaced with the much more well known David Mook vocal theme song. Those episodes were appended with the Mook theme on DVD and new airings of the show.
      • In "What a Night for a Knight" (1969), the series' first episode, the only character expressing any interest in food is Scooby. Shaggy and everybody else eat nothing. Shaggy is later depicted as a Big Eater. Also in the same episode, the characters Scooby, Shaggy, Daphne, and Velma are called by name. Despite the fact that Fred is hanging with them for most of the episode, his name is not mentioned at all. He also does not interact much with the other protagonists.
      • In "A Clue for Scooby Doo" (1969), the second episode, the team has unmasked the villain of the episode, but still do not know who he is, because they have never seen his face before. The man is clean-shaven, but Shaggy has the idea to place seaweed on his face. Shaggy realizes that the guy is Captain Cutler, who faked his death years ago. Shaggy recognizes him from a bearded portrait of a younger Cutler, which he had seen earlier that day. Shaggy acts as the smart guy of the team, while Velma is mostly irrelevant here. In most later episodes, unmasking and recognizing the villain is Velma's main task.
      • "Decoy for a Dognapper" (1969), the fifth episode, begins on a completely ordinary day, with Scooby walking down a sidewalk. The Mystery Machine is shown to be equipped with (what looked like, at the time) state-of-the-art surveillance equipment. When the "Witch Doctor" makes his appearance, Velma scoffs at it, asking how an American Indian in the 1800's could learn perfect English. Shaggy's response, "Maybe he's been taking night courses," sounds more like a sarcastic joke. While he's scared of "Geronimo's ghost" and is rightly concerned whoever is putting on the hoax might be dangerous, Shaggy isn't fooled by this ghost disguise.
      • In "Foul Play in Funland"(1969) , the eighth episode, Daphne explains to Shaggy about Scooby's apparent aversion, as if she is more familiar with Scooby's tastes in food. Most later episodes have Shaggy both knowing Scooby's tastes and sharing several of them.
      • Shaggy doesn't address Scooby as popularized shortening "Scoob" until the ninth episode, "The Backstage Rage" (1969).
      • In comparisons between this series and later entries in the franchise:
        • The depiction of Scooby Doo. His behavior - talking, reading, etc notwithstanding - is more like that of a typical dog (sniffing, barking, etc.) than in later series and films.
        • It's also the only series to not actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title. Promos during the original CBS run did use the hyphen, however.
        • Velma does not actually utter her exclamatory catchphrase ("Jinkies!") in the show's entire run. She would not until The New Scooby-Doo Movies.
        • Similarly, Daphne only says "Jeepers!" once, in "What the Hex is Going On?" (1969).
        • The "You Meddling Kids" phrase doesn't debut until the third episode of the second season, "Scooby's Night with a Frozen Fright." (A few others said some kind of variation of it Big Bob Oakley in "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts" calls them "blasted kids.") And the episode coming right after has Mr. Carswell mutter "Blasted meddling kids." But later uses and parodies eventually made it a main part of the franchise.
        • The way Scooby expresses his signature Catchphrase "Scooby Dooby Doo!" is more lower pitched and low-key in the earlier episodes by comparison to the more familiar way it's expressed later on in the franchise.
        • Also in "Hassle In The Castle": Velma sees and verbally acknowledges that the Shaggy head protruding from half of a magician's saw-in-two box was a dummy head. Shaggy pops up from the other half and says "Somebody mention me?"
        • Floorboard Failure: in "Mine Your Own Business". Justified as the mine is decades old.
        • Food as Bribe: Shaggy and Scooby can be coaxed into doing anything for food, namely Scooby Snacks.
        • Foot Bath Treatment: In "Hassle in the Castle," Scooby uses a foot bath (and a blanket) to pretend he's got a cold so he won't have to sniff out the Phantom. Naturally, the others don't fall for it.
        • Forty-Niner: "The Miner Forty-Niner", a ghostly miner, was one of the villains on an episode.
        • Fortune Teller:
          • In the Where Are You episode "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts", the gang meets a Gypsy fortune teller who gives them dire warnings. She turns out to be the episode's villain in disguise.
          • Also in "What the Hex is Going On," Scooby poses as one when a customer enters an empty swami's shop. Shaggy throws his voice and Scooby lip-syncs to it, to make it less obvious he's really a dog.
          • In this series, it was strongly implied that Fred and Daphne were boyfriend-and-girlfriend, such as dancing together at parties, wearing complementary ascots, and whatnot, but it was never confirmed if they were an Official Couple.
          • The same could be said for Velma and Shaggy at times. At times they are designated dance partners but in one case it was only a set up for a Scooby joke as he interrupts to dance with Shaggy. Some more convincing arguments come from earlier episodes where he carries her spare glasses on him at all times and she brings his cough medicine when he's ill. Such could be read as Implied Love Interest or sibling-like care. note It should be noted the characters were originally designed as brother/sister in earlier versions.
          • The gypsy fortuneteller in "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts" is revealed to be a man named Big Bob Oakley. The Cast as a Mask trope was used here, with June Foray providing the fake female voice, while John Stephenson did Big Bob's real voice.
          • The witch in "Which Witch is Which" was voiced by Don Messick, and thus is justified in that the witch was really a man named Zeb in disguise.
          • In "Never Ape an Ape Man," the title villain dons a rubber Scooby-Doo mask to perform a Mirror Routine with the real Scooby. Then later, Shaggy apparently finds the Scooby mask and wears it at the end, while Scooby finds an extra Ape Man mask.
          • A creepy old man appearing in "A Tiki Scare is No Fair" that is suspected as the villain turns out to be an undercover police officer in a rubber mask.
          • The second season intro concludes with Scooby fooling with a ghoulish latex mask while in a sewer hole.
          • In "The Backstage Rage", Velma clings to Shaggy when she's scared.
          • In "A Night of Fright Is No Delight", Velma holds Shaggy's hand while they look for clues in the caves under the mansion.
          • In "A Gaggle of Galloping Ghosts", Shaggy has Velma's spare glasses.
          • In "What a Night for a Knight", Velma carries Shaggy's cough medicine.

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          Feeding Himself

          If your little guy insists on feeding himself, sending peas and carrots everywhere, he's right on track. Most 3-year-olds can feed themselves with a spoon or fork and drink from a regular cup. If you have a picky eater, let him know he needs to sample what's on his plate rather than allowing him to refuse his dinner. Try "disguising" fruits and veggies by mixing broccoli into his mac 'n' cheese or replacing the jelly in a PB&J sandwich with apple or banana slices. Make mealtime fun and easy with finger foods such as kabobs.


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