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Recipe Review: Wong's Five Spice Chicken and More Recipes


Check out our editors' picks for this week's top food section recipes.

NY Times
• Take advantage of summer by grilling lamb with juicy peaches.

LA Times
• A quick vegetarian dinner: zucchini, feta, and basil frittata.

San Francisco Chronicle
• These sourdough waffle BLTs sound kind of amazing. Yes, this too can be yours.

NPR
• Get your hands on some fresh coconut for this crunchy coconut berry salad.

Chicago Tribune
• It might be too hot to bake, but any sort of pie (especially cherry pie) is worth it.

Seattle Times
• Classic barbecue burgers with caramelized onions never get old.

Kitchen Daily
• Or, go for pulled pork sandwiches as a crowd pleaser.

Portland Press Herald
• Then serve up a rhubarb-raspberry crisp for dessert.

Washington Post
• Tuna goes classy with this linguine, fennel, and tuna recipe.

Wall Street Journal
• New York City's Wong shares a recipe for five spice chicken skewers, perfect for a rooftop party.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.


There are many benefits of fungi, according to recent research. Mushrooms aren’t just delicious, they’re also good for you as they produce ‘adaptogenic’ compounds — assisting in anti-stress and anti-cancer treatments.

Food Navigator found that year-on-year sales of food products that include medicinal mushrooms have risen between an outstanding 200-800%, depending on the variety, and statistics have shown that the mushroom industry is expected to soar. Consulting firm Grand View Research reported that the mushroom market is expected to exceed £37 million over the next six years. That’s a lot of mushrooms.

So, how’re we going to be using them? Whilst a side of garlic mushrooms with your steak is probably a good way to start, mushroom-infused coffees and mushroom smoothies are apparently going to be making their way onto our menus. It doesn’t seem as though it stops at food either as we can expect to see mushrooms in our hair and beauty items too. Different species of mushrooms are chosen for their varying properties — for example shiitake mushrooms are known for their richness in antioxidants and high vitamin D content, and the reishi mushroom is selected for its anti-inflammatory properties.