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Where to Find the Best Seasonal Treats in New York City


We all know how glorious fall is, but there is more to this crisp season than just pretty leaves and pumpkin spice lattes (which we, too, love). Here is a roundup of the best seasonal flavors from some of the most popular sweet treat shops in New York City!

Kellogg’s NYC

Cereal-lovers get ready for Kellogg’s NYC’s newest menu additions. Chef Christina Tosi and the Kellogg’s NYC team have unveiled heart-warming flavors that include cinnamon apple with Kellogg's Cracklin’ Oat Bran, ground cinnamon, and fresh apple; harvest swoon with Kellogg's Frosted Mini-Wheats, fresh pear, ground cinnamon, and ground ginger; malted nutty banana with Kellogg's Krave Chocolate, malted milk powder, toasted hazelnuts, and fresh banana; banana nut with Kellogg's Special K Original, almond butter, and fresh banana; and; s’mores with Kellogg's Frosted Flakes, dark chocolate chips, mini marshmallows, and graham crackers. Though not exactly a seasonal item, the new birthday cake bowl tastes like a literal celebration in your mouth. Think: Kellogg's Frosted Flakes, yellow cake mix, vanilla syrup, and rainbow sprinkles. It’s guaranteed to make your day.

Schmackary's

The flavor possibilities are endless with cookies as long as you have the perfect buttery, salty-sweet base to work with. This is exactly what the always-innovating Schmackary’s offers. It recently launched its creative new flavors with a tasty variety of fall-inspired cookies. Favorites include Candied Yam made with corn flour, sweet potato, toasted pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and toasted marshmallow; Cranberry Dream made with oats, dried cranberries, white chocolate chunks, cinnamon, and lemon glaze; and Pick of the Patch made with fresh pumpkin, toffee bits, butterscotch, and caramel. Grab a carton of milk or hot coffee, and you’re good to go!

Cookie DŌ NYC

Fulfill your sugar cravings by diving into a cup of 100-percent safe-to-eat raw cookie dough. Cookie DŌ NYC’s new flavors include pumpkin spice latte; cake batter with sprinkles, chocolate chips, and white chocolate chips; and coffee toffee with signature DŌ plus espresso and chocolate-covered toffee. Mix it into ice cream, bake it, or indulge by the spoonful — the choice is yours.

Milk Bar

A popular stop for out-of-this-world desserts is Milk Bar, another sweet shop from chef Christina Tosi. Milk Bar is constantly innovating and creating unparalleled flavors. Recently added seasonal menu choices include the sweet potato pie shake: sweet potato pie soft-serve blended into a milkshake, topped with graham cracker crust and charred marshmallows.

For those with an extra strong sweet tooth, get yourself a slice of Milk Bar’s pumpkin pie cake — a spiced pumpkin cake layered with graham cracker cheesecake and rich pumpkin ganache, topped with candied pumpkin seeds and pie crumbs. Want just a bite (or three?), then treat yourself to the pumpkin pie cake truffles — spiced pumpkin cake mixed with pumpkin milk, coated with white chocolate, and rolled in spiced pie and graham cracker crumbs.

And since it’s too good not to include, while you’re at Milk Bar, get the savory Thanksgiving croissant, a stuffing-flavored bread filled with in-house roasted turkey, homemade gravy, and cranberry sauce.


Compartes
For beautifully packaged chocolate bars that pack a whole lot of holiday spirit, find yourself some of Compartes’ newest holiday flavors. Fall-inspired choices include s’mores, sticky toffee, gingerbread, and cinnamon toast.

For more on NYC's eating and drinking scenes, click here.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


The Best Babka in New York City

After Seinfeld made it mainstream in the '90s, babka, the half-yeasted-bread, half-cake hybrid from Eastern Europe, is bigger than ever. Much has changed since our first babka survey of New York five years ago, and there are more ambitious contenders for the Best Babka crown than ever before.

Not that New Yorkers' love of babka is anything new, and it's easy to see why. Babka's rich, buttery, brioche-like crumb, woven with ribbons of chocolate, is unfussy and approachable. You can eat it as dessert or breakfast, as a brunch side or a quick snack. The only trouble is not finishing a loaf as soon as you start it, because one good bite of babka demands another. And if you are new to the city and have no idea what we're talking about, take note: Eat some babka. It's one of the best sweets you'll find in New York.

Babka's current renaissance (which, sorry cinnamon fans, seems to be restricted to the chocolate version) can be attributed to two factors. The first is the continued proliferation of high quality bakeries across New York, many of which are including babka in their offerings alongside croissants.

The second is one particular babka that emerged in 2013: Breads Bakery's enormously popular, tradition-busting version made with a laminated dough and chocolate-hazelnut spread. How big is our Breads babka appetite? Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads, told me that when they first opened just over two years ago, they sold about a dozen loaves a day. Now, around the holidays, they sell "in the thousands."

With a new crop of highly trained bakers yearning to experiment, and a demonstrated market for the stuff, New York's babka universe has expanded in wonderful ways. Most of the bakeries in this guide didn't even exist when we last examined babka five years ago, and while you can still get any number of excellent traditional babkas, there are some newfangled versions worth seeking out as well.

Regardless of the babka you go for, there are some rules. First and foremost, the babka must taste fresh. With so much babka at our fingertips there's no reason to settle for a stale loaf with a crumb that tastes like a cheap dinner roll. Many popular bakeries with purportedly great babkas didn't make the cut for us because they just weren't that fresh at peak hours when they ought to be.

Second, there has to be some balance between the chocolate (or other filling) and the bread layers. Too much bread and you might as well be eating challah or brioche. Similarly, I love chocolate as much as anyone, but if the babka's so full of chocolate that it tastes like a giant brownie, that's not good.


Watch the video: Which NYC Bagel is Best? The Bagel Battle! New York Food Guide (December 2021).